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Full text of "Minutes of the organization of the Liberty Baptist Association"

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




19/a-1945 



Hot TO BE. C. - 



1 


Digitized by 


the Internet Archive 








in 2013 


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http://archive.org/details/minutesoforganiz4145libe 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1941 



One Hundred and Ninth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

NEW FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 

R. F. D. 6, Wl NSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
September 9^h and lOfh, 1941 



The next Session will be held September 8th and 9th, 1942 

Tfie First Day wirfi The Liberty Church, 
Thomasville, N. C, R. F. D. 2 

Tlie Second Day wilh The Abbots Creek Church 
High Point, N. C, R. F. D. 2 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1941 



One Hundred and Ninth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

NEW FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 

R.F. D. 6/ WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
September 9fh and lO+li, 19^1 



The next Session will be held September 8th and 9th, 1942 

Ttie Fir$t Day wi*)i Ttie Liberty Church, 
Thomasville, N. C, R. F. D. 2 

Ihe Second Day w\l\\ The Abbots Creek Church 
High Point, N. C, R. F. D. 2 



^AKt FOREST UNIVfcK;>in 



M 

INDEX 



Addresses 17-21-23-27 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 41 

Auxiliaries — Associational 3-32-39 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

B. T. U. Associational Meetings 4 

Biblical Recorder Representatives 20 

Church Clerks 47 

Church Treasurers 48 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3 

Appointed by the Moderator 13 

To Bring Reports for 1941 29 

On Time, Place and Preacher 13 

Standing 3 

Constitution and By-Laws 6 

Deceased Members 40 

Directories: Associational 3 

Church 41 

Ordained Ministers 41 

Choir 42 

Election of Officers 19 

Historical Table 50-51 

Messengers 4 

New Pastors 12 

Order of Business 9 

Orphanage Representative 4-19 

Pastors of Association 41-43 

Proceedings, Associational 9 

Reports: Baptist Periodicals 10 

Committee on Obituaries 31-40 

B. T. U 27 

Committee on Nominations of Officers 19 

Committee on Resolutions 30 

Committee on Nominations of Reporters 29 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 24 

Digest of Church Letters ....^ :.„..;.17 

Foreign Missions „. 16 

Hospitals 11 

Education 20 

Mills Home 21 

Ministerial Relief 28 

Public Morals 26 

State Missions 14 

Sunday Schools 23 

Treasurer's 30 

W. M. U. Work !....""..!.25 

Sunday School Associational Meetings 4-37 

Statistical Tables 43-51 

Sermon, Annual 14 

Sunday School Superintendents 44 

Visitors 13 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, Moderator Denton, N. C. 

C. C. Wall, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

3am J. Smith, Clerk Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 



PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Name Church and Address 

J, A. Neilson, Chairman Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

J. P. Traynham Abbotts Creek, Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1. 

B. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue, Thomasville, N. C. 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill, Lexington, N, C. Rt. 6. 

L. E. Rickard Churchland, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

A. L. Snider '. Denton, Denton, N. C. 

C. C. Haynes Erlanger, Erlanger, N. C. 

D. L. Owen Floyd S. S., Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6. 

G. C. Palmer Holloways, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

H. L. Palmer Jersey, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

C. M. Wall, Sr Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

B. J. May Liberty. Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2. 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek, High Rock, N. C. 

C. P. Motsinger New Friendship, Winston -Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

I. G. Greer Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 2. 

P. M. Smith Pleasant Plains, Denton, N. C. 

J. C. Leonard Reeds, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

Millard Wilson Reid Street, Thomasville, N. C. 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial, Lexington, N. C. 

E. W. Koonts , Smith Grove, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove, Southmont, N. C. 

L. C. Carrick Summerville, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, Thomasville, N. C. 

Add Cranford Taylors Grove, New London, N. C. 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg, Wallburg, N. C. 

E. R. Klass Walters Grove, Cid, N. C. 

M. L. Craver Welcome, Welcome, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY OR OTHER PAID EMPLOYEE 
None. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

None. . ■ 

ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
W. M. U. Convention 



Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Superintendent 

Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Asst. Superintendent 



Lexington, N. C. 

Rt. 5, W.-Salem, N. C. 



4 



MINUTES OF THE 



Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, Sec. & Treas Welcome, N. C. 

Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Personal Service Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. N. C. Teague, Young Peoples Leader Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C. 

Annual Meeting was held April 18, 1941. See Page 32. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

C. F. Motsinger, Gen. Supt Rt. 5, Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Miss Ila Hensley, Secretary Lexington, N. C. 

Meetings were held March 9 and July 6, 1941. See Page 37. 



B. T. U. CONVENTION 

W. R. Eddinger, President Rt. 1, Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Vessie Gillespie, Secretary Thomasville, N. C. 

Meetings were held on Sept. 29, and Dec. 29, 1940, and June 29, 1941. 
See Page 38. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE BROTHERHOOD 



None. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS 
OF THE ASSOCIATION 

The Mills Home 
Thomasville, N. C. 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

B. W. Spillman, Chairman Elinston, N. C. 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 



OFFICERS BAPTIST SCHOOLS STATE BOARDS 
AND INSTITUTIONS 

Residing Within the Association 



Louis S. Gaines, Member General Board Lexington, N. C. 

Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

W. K. McGee, Trustee Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Trustee Mars Hill College Lexington, N. C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. McMillan, Trustee Wake Forest College Thomasville, N. C. 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Grady Green, Ray Green, John Welborn, Charlie 
Bodenheimer, John Spurgeon, Mrs. Daisy Spurgeon, Mrs. 
Laura Moore, Clarence F. Moore. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Rev. J. A. Cox, Luria Wilson, Josephine Davis. 

CENTER HILL— Mrs. Ray Owen, Mrs. H. L. Miller, Mrs. D. L. Ty- 
singer, Sam Jarrett, Miss Troy Jarrett, Miss Edith Jarrett, 
Wade Jarrett. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



CHURCHLAND— Mrs. J. C. Sowers, Mrs. Graham Barnes, Glenn 

Barnes, Gilmer Beck, Mrs. Hugh Davis, Mrs. John Brewer, 

E. L. Grubb, Mrs. H. L. Walser. 
DENTON— A. L. Snider, J. L. Snider, W. R. Snider, R. C. Wall, Floyd 

Coggins, Mrs. Floyd Coggins, Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Mrs. V. K. 

Skeen. 

ERLANGER— Smith Crow, Mrs. E. C. Roach, Mrs. M. E. Perkins, Mrs. 

B. L. Hames, Mrs. Smith Crow, Mrs. T. H. Ayers. 
FLOYD SUNDAY SCHOOL— D. L. Owen, Ray Hedrick. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mr. J. A. McCarn, Hugh Palmer, Mrs. L. C. Cross, 

Mr. Ray Crook, Mrs. Marvin Carrick. 
JERSEY— John Colpey, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Roach, Mr. and Mrs. 

I. A. Sharpe, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Palmer. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. S. E. Miller, Miss Ollie Mendenhall, Rev. L. S. 

Gaines, Sam J. Smith, Miss Ila Hensley, C. M. Wall, Sr., 

Miss Roxie Sheets, Miss Bessie Goss, Mrs. L. S. Baines, Mrs. 

D. F. Conrad, P. A. Myers, Dr. F. G. Johnson, B. F. Lee, 

C. C. Wall, Mrs. G. D. Hamil, Mrs. B. F. Lee, J. A. Sink, 
Mrs. Virgil Parker. 

LIBERTY — Mrs. Austin Sink, Mrs. T. A. Slate, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, 
L. V. Miller, Mrs. C. R. Lambeth, Stuart Hepler, Mrs. N. F. 
Hooker, T. A. Slate. 

LICK CREEK— Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, A. L. Bean, J. C. Reid, Mrs. A. M. 
Cole, Mr. and Mrs. Henry McDonald. 

MILLS HOME— Miss Beatrice Council, Miss Viola Hester, Mrs. C. C. 
McCoin, Miss Sallie McCracken, W. B. Lord, Miss Bess Carter, 
C. C. McCoin, Mrs. J. A. Allison, Mrs. W. B. Lord, Mrs. I. G. 
Greer. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW— J. L. Carrick, Harris Wall, J. L. Briggs. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— E. L. Snider, H. H. Barnes, Mrs. A. J. Hartman, 

W. B. Doby, W. J. Doby, Mrs. C. O. Fagg. 
OAK HILL MEMORIAL— Mrs Laura Leonard, Mrs. Ira Beck, Mrs. 

Ray Underwood, K. C. Lambeth, Mrs. Dixton, Mrs. H. W. 

Kinney. 

PLEASANT PLAINS— Mrs. Freeman Smith, Mrs. Fate Loflin, Mrs. 

Adline Poole, Miss Edith Poole, F. M. Smith, George Hill. 
REEDS— Mrs. T. R. Koonts, J. A. Combs, Mrs. A. R. Craver, Eugene 

Snider, J. H. Farabee, I. A. Myers, Mrs. Golden Koonts, Mrs. 

T. H. Michael. 

REID STREET— Rev. Otis Lanning, Mrs. Millard Wilson, Mrs. S. A. 
Renegar, Mrs. J. V. Luther. 

RICH FORK— T. H. Small, Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Mrs. Sallie Orender, 
Mrs. Allen Stillwell, Willie Bowers, John Clinard, O. F. Tate, 
Hoayl Tate. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Rev. C. S. Young, Mrs. C. S. Young, J. W. 

Byars, G. R. Bean, Mrs. Z. V. Fullbright, Mrs. J. H. Guffy, 

Miss Mattie Bean. 
SMITH GROVE— G. E. Morefield, G. C. Orrell, Mrs. Gray Clement, 

I. E. Lassiter, Miss Etta Queen, Mrs. W. F. Beck, Mrs. H. S. 

Lanning, E. W. Koonts, 
SOUTHSIDE— Rev. S. G. Snider, Mrs. S. G. Snider, Mrs. Lawrence 

Stroud, Mrs. Julia Beck, Mrs. Mable Stinson, Mrs. Marie 

Crump. 

STONER'S GROVE— L. E. Lookabill, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Warfford, 
Mrs. Conrad Warfford, Mrs. Myrtle Ward. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



SUMMERVILLE — E. I. Snider, Emma Carrick, Robbins Bean, Lois 

Carrick, George Tysinger. 
TAYLOR'S GROVE— Mrs. Flata Russell, Mrs. Ray Owen, Mrs. Adam 

Cranford, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Woodard, Doris Potts. 
THOMASVILLE FIRST— L. E. Teague, J. R. Proctor, Mrs. R. G. 

Jennings, Mrs. R. S. Green, L. W. Hansell, Mrs. T. M. Jones, 

Miss Vessie Gillespie, Mrs C. C. Coppedge, Mrs. C. F. Finch, 

Mrs. Ramond Boaz, Mrs. W. K. McGee, Mrg. A. Z. Boles. 
WALLBURG— Roby C. Clodfelter, Jimmy Hines, Ben King, Mrs. 

Robah Bull, Mrs. O. H. Rothrock, Claud Cook. 
WALTER'S GROVE^Mrs. Cal Gallimore, Mrs. John Yates, Mrs. E. 

P. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Klass, Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, 

Mrs. Millard Surratt. 
WELCOME— Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Disher, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Snider, 
M. L. Craver, C. S. Haynes, Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, Mrs. T. H. Mills. 



CONSTITtrriON AND BY-LAWS 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall b€ the object of this association to furnish 
the gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the 
association, pastors of the churches in the association, and messen- 
gers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 
thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all business 
in the association between the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the association. The 
association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 



/ 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 



TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September, The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the 
association, 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8, This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number present, 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
CHURCHES NOT CONTRIBUTING TO BENEVOLENCES 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the 
Liberty Association has as its chief function the propagation of a 
missionary spirit among our people, and inasmuch as a church which 
fails to contribute to beneficences outside its local budget fails to 
justify its claim of being a missionary Baptist church, we therefore 
recommend that a church which contributes nothing to missionary 
objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the association it 
shows no improvement in its gifts. 

See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters 
might have their report ready for the first day of the Association in 
the future, Rev. Walter Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that 
our Association year close with the last Sunday in August each year, 
and that immediately after this date the different church clerks 
prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the Association. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes, 

ORDINATION OF NEW MINISTERS 

As Recommended By Executive Promotion Committee And Adopted 
By The Association 

See page 27 of 1939 Minutes, 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



1 — That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for 
examination and approval for ordination to the full work of the 
Gospel Ministry, an Examining Council be summoned by written 
invitation of at least one week in advance from the church nominat- 
ing the candidate, the Council to include the pastor and one member- 
at-large from each Baptist Church in the fellowship of the Associa- 
tion. 

2— That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly 
in the auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announce- 
ment given in good time so that all the brethren who wish to do so 
may attend the examination. 

3 — That we ordain only those who have received a definite call 
to become pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its 
Association, which church shall have requested his ordination. 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES 

It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to 
organize themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking 
the recognition of and the fellowship and cooperation with this 
Association, be requested to fulfill the following requirements: 

1 — Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of 
the desire to organize a church before any such organization takes 
place. The moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Com- 
mittee to study and pass upon the need of and the practicability 
for such an organization. 

2 — The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so 
as not to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of 
the churches already affiliated with this Association. This will be 
determined by the Promotion Executive Committee. 

2 —Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee, 
the group will then request a council to examine the church covenant 
and the articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended 
that this council consist of three pastors and three laymen of the 
Association appointed by the Moderator. Should this council approve 
the covenant and articles of faith, the group will then proceed to be 
constituted into a Baptist Church of the same faith and order. 

4 — The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, 
may at the next annual Association present a letter to the Association 
asking for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, 
including with this letter a copy of the articles of Faith and the 
church covenant adopted by the body, as well as a report of the work 
since time of organization as it regards all phases of our Baptist 
Program of Missions, Evangelism, Education, Social Service, Training 
?nd Worship. 

5 — The previously appointed council of three pastors and three 
laymen will examine the letter and reports of the newly organized 
church, and will recommend to the Association its acceptance or 
rejection as the case may be. 

See Minutes of 1941, Page 20. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSCXJIATION 



9 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ONE HUNDRED NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

NEW FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 
R. F. D. No. 6, Winston- Salem, N. C. 

September 9th and 10th, 1941 



TUESDAY 
Morning Session September 9, 1941 

1. On Tuesday, September 9, 1941, at 9:45 A. M. 
The Liberty Baptist Association assembled in the One 
Hundred Ninth Annual Session with the New Friend- 
ship Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, N. C, R. F. D. 
No. 6. 

2. Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the church at 
New Friendship, conducted the Opening Devotional. 

3. At 10:00 A. M., R. D. Covington, the Modera- 
tor, called the Body to order for the transaction of 
business. 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

4. The Report of the Program; Committee was 
read by Sam J. Smith and was adopted. 

FIRST DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. L. J. Matthews 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Christian Literature Rev. T. W. Bray 

10:40 Baptist Hospital B. J. May 

11:15 Roll Call: recognition of new pastors and visitors; 
appointment of committees by Moderator. 

11:40 Annual Sermon Rev. N. C. Teague 

12:30 Lunch 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



AFTERNOON 



2:00 Praise and Worship Rev. B. A. Mitchell 

2:15 Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions J. W. Dickens 

2. Home Missions Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 

3. Foreign Missions Rev. H. M. Stroup 

2:35 Address M. A. Huggins, General Secretary 

3:25 State of Churches Rev. J. A. Neilson 

1. Digest of church letters (Blackboard) 

2. Associational goals for next year 

SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. E. C. Roach 

10:00 Election of Officers— Business 

10:20 Christian Education Dr. W. K. McGee 

11:00 Baptist Orphanage Rev. L. J. Matthews 

11:35 Sunday Schools Miss Ila Hensley 

12:05 American Bible Society Rev. Louis S. Gaines 

12:30 Lunch 

AFTERNOON 

1:45 Praise and Worship Rev. Worth Grant 

2:00 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. Louis E. Gaines 

2:30 Pubhc Morals and Law Enforcement Rev. N. C. Teague 

3:05 B. T. U Miss Vessie Gillespie 

3:35 Ministerial Relief Rev. D. W. Digh 

4:00 Reports of Committees, etc. 



R. D. Covington. Moderator 
G. W. Miller, Vice-Moderator 
Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treasurer 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

5. The Report on Christian Literature was read by 
Rev. T. W. Bray, pastor of the Rich Fork church, and 
after an address on Christian Literature by Rev. R. H. 
Satterfield, representative of The Biblical Recorder, 
it was adopted. 

The Baptist people of North Carolina are highly favored with 
splendid Christian Literature coming from their own State period- 
icals. The great Baptist book, The Bbile — holds first place in the 
hearts and minds of our people, in the main. For the Bible is dis- 
tinctly a "Baptist Book." "The Bible was written by Baptist preach- 
ers; about Baptists; for Baptists; to make Baptists." 

Our own Biblical Recorder, the official organ of the State Bap- 
tist Convention, is printed weekly, ati Raleigh, N. C. Dr. John G. 
Slemp — Editor. The Recorder is now owned by N. C. Baptists. And 
is fulfilling its purpose in an admirable way among the "Reading 
Baptists" people of our State. The paper carries a well balanced 
news each week of information both State and southwide. With 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



current news of worth and interest. Inspirational articles, sermons, 
editorials, and a complete news in every department of the Co- 
operative Program. I trust, that we, of the Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion will give our full support to this important matter by putting 
the Recorder in every Baptist home through our churches. While 
we have the cherished and Divine liberty, may we release the Baptist 
message and mission through our printed page. 

Our other State Baptist news weekly is the Charity and Children. 
Printed at Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. Dr. John Arch McMillan, 
Editor. This paper's main business is to keep N. C. Baptists in 
constant touch with their Orphanage work and mission. Aside from 
the State Orphanage news, Charity and Children carries a fine 
variety of news calculated to meet the needs of the entire family. 
No one can be considered the best type of Baptist in N. C. until he 
supports the Orphanage, and reads the Charity & Children. 

Looking beyond our State to the Southern Baptist Convention 
agencies, we have access to a very large variety of Christian Litera- 
ture. From Nashville, Tenn. — The Sunday School Board: Dr. T. L. 
Holcomb, Executive Secretary-Treasurer— Comes our S. S. and B. T. 
U. Literature; along with a large group of fine periodicals covering 
every phase of Christian Education in our Churches. Fi'om Atlanta, 
Ga., comes the "Home Mission," our Home Mission monthly. Dr. 
J. B. Lawrence, Secretary. Prom Birmingham, Ala., comes the W. 
M. U. manuels and magazines. For Y. W. A., G. A.'s, R. A.'s and 
Sunbeams: Miss Kathleen Mallory, Secretary. From Richmond, Va,, 
comes the "Commission," our Foreign Mission news magazine. Dr. 
Charles E. Maddry, Secretary. All of the latter publications are 
edited monthly, and can be had at a minimum cliarge. For a full 
supply of Christian Literature write your Baptist Book Store, Raleigh, 
N. C, for a catalogue. Let us adopt the Southern Baptist Book 
Store Manager's slogan for 1941, "When you're through reading, 
you're through." 

Respectfully submitted. 

TOM W. BRAY. 



BAPTIST HOSPITALS 

6. The report on The Baptist Hospital was read by 
B. J. May, a layman of the Liberty church. After an 
address on the workings and accomplishments of the 
Hospital at Winston-Salem, by Smith Hagerman, Su- 
perintendent of the Hospital, the report was adopted. 

The early churches followed the teachings of Jesus by carrying 
on a program of ministering to and healing the sick. There is no 
record in our Bible where any sick person was ever refused the help 
desired. 

The Baptist of North Carolina have, up to a short while ago, 
failed in this part of their program to the extent that many sick 
people have had to be turned away from the Baptist hospital because 
there was no possible way to care for them. 

The enlargement program launched almost two years ago has 
now been completed and 200 additional rooms built at a cost of $550,- 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



000.00, most of which has been paid for. 

During the year ending March 1, 1941, the Hospital cared for 
4,052 patients making a total of 51,395 cared for during the 17i years 
of its ministery, of this number 20,350 were service or charity 
patients who were treated at a cost of $1,956,000.00. 

The Hospital will now be able to care for 10,000 or more patients 
each year and perhaps no one turned away for lack of room or 
equipment. 

Where the Hospital has been touching vitally the lives of 20,000 
fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters and members of the immediate 
families of the patients treated each year it will now be able to 
touch the lives of 50,000 people scattered throughout North Carolina 
from the mountains to the sea. 

The Hospital has a staff of 76 medical and surgical doctors. A 
specialist for every particular case is at the call of the Hospital any 
minute day or night. There are 91 nurses besides an adequate num- 
ber of special graduate nurses at the service of the patients at all 
times. This number will necessarily be increased as the work expands 
in the new buildings. 

The Baptist Hospital was established for the purpose of providing 
hospital treatment for the sick of the entire state, but primarily for 
those who are not financially able to pay a hospital bill. The cost 
of treating these service patients is about $4.00 per day and per 
patient. The Duke Endowment Fund pays $1.00 per day for the 
treatment of charity patients, but the Hospital depends almost 
entirely on the Mother's Day offerings to pay for this service, as the 
money received from the Co-operative Program goes to the liquida- 
tion of the Hospital Construction Bonds and can not be used for 
operating expenses of the Hospital. 

We urge the Baptists of North Carolina to support the Hosptial 
in every way possible, also that the W. M. U. organizations increase 
their gifts of linens, etc., for the Hospital. 

Last May the Baptist Churches of North Carolina gave $25,165.72 
as a Mother's Day offering to the Hospital. We especially urge that 
they double that amount next May. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. J. MAY. 



ROLL CALL OF THE CHURCHES 

7. The Roll Call of the Churches was made by the 
Clerk of the Association and it was found that all the 
Churches were represented. 

NEW PASTORS RECOGNIZED 

8. The following new pastors in the Association 
were recognized: Rev. Worth Grant, Pastor of the 
Liberty Church ; Rev. B. A. Mitchell, pastor at Abbotts 
Creek, and Rev. C. L. Pickler, pastor at Summerville. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 

9. At this time the Moderator appointed the fol- 
lowing committees: 

(1) FINANCE— Rev. D. W. Digh, Chairman; Rev. S. G. Snider, 
Rev. C. L. Pickler, Miss Troy Jarrett, Hugh Palmer, D. L. 
Owen, Mrs. Ray Underwood, L. E. Teague. 

(2) TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— Rev. E. C. Roach, Chair- 
man; Rev. Worth Grant. Rev. T. B. Flowe, Gilmer Beck, 
John Copley, P. A. Myers, J. L. Carrick, Hugh Warfford. 

(3) TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING THE REPORTS FOR 
NEXT YEAR— Rev. N. C. Teague, Chairman; Rev. H. M. 
Stroup, Rev. E. F. Eagle, John Welborn. A. L. Snider, Smith 
Crow, C. M. Wall, Sr., W. P. Eddinger. 

(4) TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1942— Rev. J. L. Matthews, 
Chairman; Rev. Otis Lanning. Rev. T. W. Bray, J. C. Reid, 
Miss Sallie McCracken, Eugene Snider. E. I. Snider, Roby 
C. Clodfelter. 

(5) ON OBITUARIES— Rev. J. A. Neilson, Chairman; Rev. B. A. 
Mitchell, Rev. J. M. Pickler, Stuart Hepler, E. L. Snider, H. 
H. Barnes, Mrs. Fate Loflin. 

(6) ON RESOLUTIONS— Rev. C. C. Eddinger, Chairman; Rev. 
Chas. S. Young, Rev. J. A. Cox, Mrs. C. F. Finch, Mrs. Flata 
Russell, E. R. Klass, G. R. Bean. 

(7) COUNCIL ON ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES— Rev. L. 
S. Gaines, Chairman; Rev. W. K. McGee, Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Millan. C. F Motsinger, M. L. Craver, B. J. May. 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

10. The following visitors were recognized: 

Mr. and Mrs. B. K. Mason, of the Pilot Mountain 
Association, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mr. George D. Clodfelter, Pilot Mountain Asso- 
ciation, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

J. M. Stoner, Murphy, N. C, formerly of South- 
mont, N. C. 

Mr. Smith Haggerman, Superintendent of Baptist 
Hospital, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rev. J. N. McCaughan, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rev. and Mrs. H. P. Miller, Piedmont Association, 
High Point, N. C. 

Dr. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, N. C, Secretary Bap- 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



tist State Convention. 

Rev. Floyd B. Clark, Rt. 2, Lexington, N. C, Ran- 
dolph Association. 

R. L. Marshall, Sweet Water, Tenn. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

11. Before the delivery of the Sermon, Rev. T. W. 
Bray read some verses from the 9th Chapter of Mark 
and led the Body in prayer. 

The Annual Sermon was delivered by Rev. N. C. 
Teague, pastor of the Reeds and Churchland churches. 

His subject was "LIMITING GOD". 
The text being taken from Mark 9, 21 and 22. 

ADJOURNMENT 

The Body adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to reconvene 
at 2:00 P. M. 



TUESDAY 
Afternoon Session 
DEVOTIONALS 

12. The Afternoon Devotional was conducted by 
Rev. B. A. Mitchell, pastor of the Abbotts Creek and 
Wallburg Churches. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

13. The report on State Missions prepared by J. 
W. Dickens, a layman of the Holloways Church was 
read by Rev. H. M. Stroup. 

The report on Home Missions was prepared and 
read by Mrs. S. O. Hinkle of the New Friendship 
Church. 

The report on Foreign Missions was prepared and 
read by Rev. H. M. Stroup, pastor of the Denton, Hol- 
loways and Stoners Grove Churches. 

All of these reports were adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS 

For long years after the Baptist State Convention was organized, 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



more than one hundred years ago, the primary purpose of what is 
called State Missions was to promote evangelism, to establish 
churches and support the churches thus established by giving aid 
to the pastors of the churches until such time as they could become 
self-supporting 

However, the purpose of State Missions is to help the churches 
in the state of North Carolina to establish the reign of Christ in 
the hearts of the people through the various agencies, and organiza- 
tions of the churches. 

It is astonishing to us when we face the facts that North Carolina 
ranks first as compared with the other 47 states in homicides, ninth 
in rape, thirteenth in auto thefts, and seventeenth in burglary. There 
are perhaps in North Carolina a million people to whom the Lord 
Jesus means nothing. Then also, there are perhaps 800,000 prospects 
for Baptist churches in this state. Then, too, there are approximately 
two hundred thousand church members, that is to say, about one- 
half of our total membership, who do not attend with any regularity, 
any Sunday School at all. 

These are just a few of the astonishing facts that confront the 
the Baptist people of this state. 

The State Mission Board, through its leader, Mr. Huggins and 
his co-workers, is striving through the various agencies of the church, 
to do something in a conservative way to meet the needs of the 
people of our great state. 

Our two missionaries, Mr. Alexander and Mr. Pipes have for 
some years been giving a major portion of their time to the develop- 
ment of all the churches they can reach through stewardship and 
missions. 

Much work is being done by the department of Sunday Schools, 
the Baptist Training Union, Student work at our colleges, Schools 
for Pastors and Ministry to other races. 

In addition to the above work, the Mission Board is doing much 
work among our prisoners, our wayward girls and boys who are in 
state institutions. 

With the coming of our defense program, there has devolved 
upon us an added responsibility in this state to provide wholesome 
surroundings for the boys in these camps. When they are on leaves 
in the towns and cities near which the camps are located. 

In order that the present situation be taken care of as it should 
be, there is need for an increase in our contributions to State Mis- 
sions of around $75,000 a year. 

The challenge is ours as a Baptist people in this State. What 
shall be our answer? 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. DICKENS, JR. 

MISSIONS IN THE HOMELAND 

Making and keeping our homeland Christian is the challenging 
task of the Home Mission Board. Over one-half of the population 
of the Southern Baptist Convention territory is not affiliated with 
any church. The Home Mission Board majors in the making and 
baptizing of believers in Jesus Christ in all of our work. And, as the 
Gospel is the only power known among men that can transform 
the unbelieving heart into a childlike faith and trust in Jesus Christ 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



as Savior and Lord, we are endeavoring to give the Gospel to the 
twenty-six language groups that are in our Southland, as well as the 
American Indians, the deaf and the neglected people of our cities. 

The Home Mission Board now has 391 missionaries working in 
915 mission stations with 71 new stations opened and 14 new pieces 
of property acquired this year. There has been 724,505 tracts and 
4,443 Bibles and Testaments distributed, over seventy thousand peo- 
ple have been personally visited and talked to about their Souls' 
salvation in addition to the people appealed to in the 31,403 sermons 
preached, with 5,375 people making professions of faith. 

During the past year the Board has made real progress in the 
payment of its debts. During the year, $181,130.41 has been paid 
on the principal. The receipts of the Board have shown, a marked 
increase over the receipts of the year before, and this increase in 
receipts has enabled the Board to make an increased payment on the 
principal of its debts. The debt-paying program of the Board as now 
projected will, if the receipts of the Board through the Co-operative 
Program remain the same, liquidate the debt in full by 1945. This 
is a goal to which we have been looking for the past twelve years. 

We are happy also to announce that on February 1, 1941, we 
refinanced our debt, issuing bonds without security for $850,000. On 
these bonds the first half bearing 3%% interest. The total saving 
in interest will amount to about $9,000 a year. The total saving, if 
we pay our debts by 1945, will be about $45,000 in interest. 

Total receipts from all sources for the year is $560,168.09. 

These figures do not tell the story of what has been accom- 
plished, they only give the framework. No one can tell what the 
salvation of one soul means, much less cast up the effect of a great 
group of men and women whose lives are devoted to the winning 
of the lost to Christ. Only the records of the Judgment Book, when 
the story is told and the rewards are given in Heaven, can give 
the completed returns of the work of the fatihful missionaries of the 
Home Mission Board in the past year. These men and women have 
been faithful, loyal, devoted, self-sacrificing and true in their service 
for the Master, and for their faithfulness we honor them in the 
name of the Lord Jesus. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. S. O. HINKLE. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 

"Despite the threat of war and actual war," writes Dr. C. E. 
Maddry, Secretary of the Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., 
"the Foreign Mission Board is able to report that the Convention 
year just closed was one of the best of its long history of 96 years." 
This is indeed gratifying seeing the little or nothing the churches 
are doing to send the Gospel to those who "sit in darkness." 

If one will take the time to study the reports of the Associations 
of the state as given in the Recorder, such a study would reveal a 
startling carelessness or down-right indifference to the words of 
Jesus in the Great Commission. It is appalling the great number 
of zero churches or near zero churches this study reveals. And at 
the same time, we claim to be missionary. 

Even though this is true, the Board is able to report 457 Mis- 
sionaries. These with 3,000 native unpaid workers are teaching. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



preaching' and healing in 16 countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and 
South America. 35,291 students have been taught, 136,994 patients 
have been ministered to and a host too great to be numbered has 
had the Gospel preached unto them. There were 18,542 baptisms 
during the year, and a membership of 251,734 contributed a total of 
$379,896 for the Cause of Christ. 

Through the splendid efforts of the women in the Southland, 
they contributed through the Lottie Moon offering last year $363,- 
743.50, thus enabling the Board to be able to report the good hopes 
of a debtless board in 1945. This is a cheering hope since just a 
few years ago when Dr. Maddry took the reigns of the Board there 
was a debt of $1,110,000. Of this staggering debt, only $205,000 re- 
mains. There was paid on this last year $40,000. Every Baptist will 
shout when this debt is wiped out. 

All Pastors of the Association are called upon to help dissiminate 
knowledge as to the great work of our Board. One definite and 
helpful way is to get the Commission, the organ of the Foreign 
Mission Board, into every home. This paper has a circulation at 
present of 23,190 and can be secured for the whole year for only 
fifty cents. 

One heartening bit of inspiration comes from war torn China. 
"Never were the services of the servants of God more appreciated 
than now," writes Dr. Maddry. "Recently Generalissimo Chiang 
Kai-Shek offered to pay transportation costs of Missionaries who 
would go into free China." The people are hungry for something 
they do not have. We have, or ought to have, the very thing that 
will satisfy this hunger. We must get it to them at all costs. 

The same call comes from every ripe field in which we work. 
We must hear and heed this call or lose our own souls. 

War- torn Europe is scathing and raging with hate. One of 
these days war will be over when they are exhausted. They will want 
something to heal and help. We will need a great reserve of the 
Gospel so that we may enter with the healing Gospel and be 
able to help their hurt. Only the Gospel will help them. It is either 
"Christ or chaos." They have or will soon have brought themselves 
to chaos. We must carry Christ to them. 

Let every Pastor and Christian leader bestir themselves in the 
matter of Foreign Missions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. M. STROUP. 



ADDRESS BY DR. M. A. HUGGINS 

14. Dr. M. A. Huggins, Secretary of the Baptist 
State Convention, addressed the Association on the 
different phases of the work being done by the Bap- 
tist State Convention. 



DIGEST OF THE CHURCH LETTERS 

15. The digest of Church Letters was brought by 
Rev. J. A. Neilson. The same was adopted. 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

I. AS TO MEMBERSHIP. 

The churches of the Liberty Association report 7,067 members 
this year, over against 6,812 last year, a gain of 225 members. There 
were 356 baptisms during the year, an increase of 56 over last year, 
though two of our churches reported no baptisms at all. For the 
first time in at least eight years, every church reported having one 
or more revival meetings, 34 meetings in all being held, the largest 
number ever reported by the Liberty Association. Twenty-one of our 
churches show an increase in membership this year, seven a decrease, 
while one remains the same. 

II. AS TO SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK. 

There are 6,911 enrolled in our Sunday Schools, which is ten 
less than last year, but the average attendance this year is greater, 
which is a good sign. It is gratifying to see a steady increase in the 
number of Daily Vacation Bible Schools held. Seventeen churches 
reported schools with an enrollment of 1,523, over against 13 churches 
reporting last year with an enrollment of 1,306. 

III. AS TO TRAINING UNION WORK. 

This year our churches report only 85 unions with 1,098 enrolled, 
15 less unions and 231 less members than last year. Eleven churches 

We have 98 of our young people as students in college this year, 
72 more than were reported last year. 

IV. AS TO W. M. U. WORK. 

The W. M. U.'s of our Association report 102 organizations with 
1,869 enrolled, an increase of 10 organizations and 118 members. The 
increase in the number of organizations is due largely to the increase 
in the number of missionary societies. However, we still have eight 
churches without any W. M. U. These 102 organizations contributed 
$10,099.69, increasing their gifts over those of last year by $2,280.70. 

V. AS TO GIFTS. 

1. To Local Church Expenses. 

These amounted to $56,597.01, a gain of $9,009.20 over last 
year. 

2. To Benevolences (not including the Orphanage). 

These amounted to $20,697.08, a slight decrease of $151.94. 

3. To The Orphanage— $5,429.64, an increase of $694.33. 

4. To The Cooperative Program— $8,649.11, an increase of $129.48. 

5. To All Causes— $77,294.09, an increase of $8,857.26, and the 
largest amount ever contributed by the churches of the 
Liberty Association. Gifts per capita increased from $10.04 
to $10.94. 

Every church gave to the Orphanage and to Missions and Benev- 
olences. Every church but two gave to the Hospital. Every church 
report no training union at all. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



but three gave to the Cooperative Program. Twenty-five churches 
increased their gifts to local work, while 6 decreased their gifts 
locally. Twenty-two churches increased and 9 churches decreased 
their gifts to Missions and Benevolences. 

Taken as a whole, this is the best report our churches have yet 
made to the Association. This should give us cause for gratitude to 
God for His blessings to us individually and collectively, and should 
send us back to our churches with the firm resolve to redouble our 
efforts for the ongoing of God's Kingdom at home and abroad. There 
is yet so "much to be done. Let us arise and do it! 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON. 

ADJOURNMENT 

16. After being led in prayer by Rev. J. A. Neil- 
son the Association adjourned to reconvene tomor- 
row at 9 :15 A. M. 



THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY 
Morning Session, September 10, 1941, 10:00 A. M. 

17. The song service of the Morning Devotional 
was conducted by Mr. Carey Davis, a layman of the 
Wallburg Church. The Association was lifted up 
with a quartet composed of D. S. Hayworth, Rev. B. 
A. Mitchell, Rev. E. C. Roach and Carey Davis as they 
sang, ''Jesus Pilot Me." 

The Devotional was conducted by Rev. E. C. 
Roach, pastor of the Erlanger Church. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

18. Rev. L. J. Matthews, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee heretofore appointed to recommend officers for 
next year made their report as follows, which w^as 
adopted : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1942 

We recommend: 

For Moderator — Rev. H. M. Stroup. 
For Vice Moderator — Mr. Carroll C. Wall. 
For Clerk and Treasurer — Mr. Sam J. Smith. 
Orphanage Representative — Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr. 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



Chairman of the Executive Committee — Rev. J. A. Neilson. 
Associational Biblical Recorder Representative — Rev. W. K. 
McGee. 

Associational Sunday School Superintendent — Mr. C. F. Mot- 
singer. 

Director of Associational B. T. U. — Wilbur Lewis, 507 Centennial 
Avenue, High Point, N. C. 

L. J. MATTHEWS, 
J. W. BRAY, 
OTIS LANNING, 
E. I. SNIDER, 

MISS SALLiE Mccracken, 

Committee on Nominations. 

19. Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that Mr. I. 
G. Greer be instructed to cast the vote of the Body 
for Rev. H. M. Stroup for Moderator. The motion 
prevailed and the vote was cast by Mr. Greer as di- 
rected in the motion. 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO ADMISSION OF 
CHURCHES 

20. Rev. J. A. Neilson offered a resolution in re- 
gard to the admission of new churches, which was 
adopted. The resolution is pirinted with Standing 
Resolutions. See page 8. 

21. A motion was made and adopted, asking the 
clerk of the Association to send copies of the resolu- 
tion adopted by the Body in regard to the admittance 
of new churches at this session and of a resolution 
adopted by the Association at the 1939 session in re- 
gard to the Ordination of Ministers to The Biblical Re- 
corder and ask them to publish both resolutions. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

22. The report on Christian Education was pre- 
pared and presented by Rev. W. K. McGee, pastor of 
the Thomasville Church. 

The report was discussed briefly by Dr. McGee 
and was adopted. 

Our Baptist schools have been one of the corner stones in the 
building of our Denomination in North Carolina and the South. In 
the early days of our State men of faith and wisdom saw that this 
must be true if we were to build a great spiritual denomination. More 
than a hundred years of histoi-y now bear testimony to the clarity of 
their vision. 

Southern Baptists have some great Christian schools, and some 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



of them are in North Carolina Their influence has been a mighty 
one through the lives and witness of those who have gone from their 
halls out into our homeland and into the nations of the earth. We 
want so to support our schools with our young people, our prayers, 
cur sympathy, and our money, and so to keep Christ at the center 
of them as to enable them with increasing power to bear their in- 
fluence for Christ through all this chaotic and bleeding world. We 
believe there is a definite tendency in North Carolina today to make 
our Baptist schools more definitely Christian in life and in teaching. 
We rejoice in this fact. We are grateful for those Christian men 
and women who are bringing this to pass. We believe our young 
people from our Baptist homes will be better fitted for living nobly 
and following Christ truly by going to one of our Christian Baptist 
schools than by going to some other school. 

North Carolina Baptists are now in the midst of the worthy 
undertaking of erecting a chapel building on the campus of their 
oldest school, Wake Forest College. For eight years Wake Forest has 
been without a chapel building where the students might come 
together for worship and other gatherings and which might represent 
the Christian center of the school. It is a large undertaking, $250,000 
being needed for it. Less than half of this amount has yet been 
raised. Baptists of financial means should give liberally to this 
cause. But all Baptists who love the cause of Christ and Wake Forest 
ought to share in this as liberally as their means will permit. Many 
in I,iberty Association have already had a share in it, but many 
more have not. Some of our chu'ches have presented it to their 
people and given them opportunity to help, but many of them have 
not. It is greatly desired that the building be started this year. But 
this cannot be done without the money. We believe this is a matter 
cf vast importance. Let us as pastors, Sunday School Superintend- 
ents. Deacons, and Christian people not fail to respond to this high 
call. Let us act as soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. K. McGee. 

ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

23. Dr. Leslie Campbell, president of Campbell 
College, brought an address on Christian Education in 
which he stressed the importance of Christian Educa- 
tion and the needs of our colleges. 

He especially urged that we raise at once enough 
funds to build the Chapel at Wake Forest College. 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

24. The report on the Mills Home was prepared 
and brought by Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the 
New Friendship Church. 

The report was adopted. 

The appeal of the needy child never grows old or burdensome 



22 



MINUTES OP THE 



to people who love and follow the One who said, "suffer the little 
ones to come unto me and forbid them not." Year after year 
during the sessions of our associational meeting the challenge of 
the orphan child has been made. It is with pleasure that we note a 
growing interest in and support of this worthy cause. Under the 
present leadership of Superintendent, Dr. I, G. Greer, the Baptists 
cf North Carolina are coming to look not only upon the suffering 
children and the appeal they make, but are putting their confidence 
in the Mills Home as a worthy Baptist Institution. 

"There are three classes of children now being cared for by the 
orphanage: full orphans, half orphans, and victims of desertion by 
wrecked homes. This service is being rendered through Mother's Aid, 
boarding homes and the Orphanage proper. In addition to this the 
Orphanage authorities are rendering a fine service by helping chil- 
dren and parents make adjustments with neighbors and relatives." 

"In spite of the fact that the government has entered the field 
of child welfare in a large way, the demands upon the Orphanage 
authorities have never been greater. They receive upon an average 
of forty-five applications every month during the year." In seeking 
to meet these urgent demands the Orphanage must be governed by 
their income and resources. Of course these are controlled by the 
members of our churches. The average cost of operating the Orphan- 
age is approximately $500.00 per day. 

Surely no one can or would want to shun such a Christian duty 
and privilege as this. Yet, we learn from the report published in 
Charity and Children in July that during the first half of 1941, there 
are six of our sister churches in the Liberty Association that have 
contributed the sum total of nothing to our Orphanage. This is 
nothing less than a shame since this is the association in which this 
noble institution is located. 

We recommend that each church and Sunday School in this 
Association adopt the plan of sending something once a month to 
the Orphanage and also make a worthy Thanksgiving offering. If 
given an opportunity those who are able will give something. Along 
with this we suggest that our Orphanage representative for the com- 
ing year keep our Sunday Schools and churches informed as to the 
needs. Also that contacts be made so that every Baptist Church in 
this Association will have the opportunity to have a part in this 
Christ-honoring work. 

We recommend, further, that along with our offerings that 
prayer be made to our Heavenly Father for those who are in 
authority and leadership at this institution. Weighty responsibilities 
rest heavily upon them day and night. They must listen to the 
stories of human need and suffering constantly and only those who 
are guided by divine wisdom can make the right decisions. Problems 
of conduct and discipline must be faced continually with such a large 
family when the children have such varied backgrounds as found 
among them. To guide, train, and develop calls not only for the 
utmost of human energies but surely failure and crime will result if 
the Divine Author and Finisher does not supply every need. God 
works in answer to the prayers of His children. 

Let each of us as a messenger pledge here and now that our 
Sunday School will help Jesus care for needy children. 

Respectfully submitted, 



LUTHER J. MATTHEWS. 



23 



PROGRAM RENDERED BY CHILDREN FROM 
MILLS HOME 

25. Under the supervision of Rev. J. A. McMillan, 
editor of Charity and Children, and Mr. and Mrs. 
W. B. Lord, of the Mills Home, a program in song 
was rendered by 18 children from the Home. 

ADDRESSES BY C. M. WALL, SR., AND 
I. G. GREER 

26. At this time an address was made by Mr. C. 
Wall, Sr., a layman of the Lexington Church and the 
Associational Representative of the Mills Home, in 
which he stressed the importance and duty of giving 
to the Mills Home. This was followed by some re- 
marks by Mr. L G. Greer, Superintendent of the Home. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

27. The report on Sunday Schools was prepared 
and read by Miss Ila Hensley, Secretary of the First 
Church, Lexington. After a short discussion by Miss 
Hensley the report was adopted. 

Everyone will agree that the Bible School, which is commonly 
called the Sunday School, is a very vital organization of our churches 
It is the teaching service, and the only organization in which the 
Bible is actually taught. I'm afraid that we are failing in our obliga- 
tion to our boys and girls and our people in the teaching period. 
We make it a place where pupils meet on Sunday socially for a chat 
about the happenings of the week. The ignorance of the Bible is 
proof that we are not doing our duty as teachers and leaders in our 
Bible Schools. We are net actually teaching the pupils the Word of 
God. If we would truly make our schools Bible schools, our people 
would be better educated in the Word, and more consecrated Christ- 
tians. We should use the Bible in teaching a class and plan the 
lesson in such a way as to encourage the pupils to use the Bible, 
in studying the lesson and in daily meditation. The study of the 
Bible cannot be over-emphasized. 

According to our records we have 7,067 church members against 
6,812 in 1940. Our Bible School enrollment shows a decrease of ten, 
6,911 as against 6,921 last year. Since a great number of our Sunday 
School members are not church members, we can see that many of 
our church members are not enrolled in the Sunday School. Ours is 
probably an average association and according to statistics as a 
result of research, there are two Baptist prospects for every pupil en- 
rolled in Baptist Sunday Schools in this Association. This means 
that we should have 13,822 prospects. When we consider this from 
a standpoint of average attendance we consider that every Sunday 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



morning there are three people that are not in our Baptist Sunday 
Schools for every one we have present. What a challenge to us as 
leaders in our Bible Schools! If we will work diligently at this task 
our Sunday School enrollment will increase next year instead of 
decrease. 

The work in Daily Vacation Bible Schools in the churches of our 
Association is being greatly enriched. Last year there were 13 schools 
with an enrollment of 1,306 while this year there were 17 schools with 
1,523 enrolled. This is to be commended and it is hoped that many 
more of our churches may realize the wonderful opportunity of serv- 
ing the boys and girls through the Daily Vacation Bible School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ILA L. HENSLEY. 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

28. Rev. Louis S. Gaines, pastor of the Lexington 
Church, presented to the Body, the work being done 
by the American Bible Society. He appealed that 
each churoh place in their budget an amount to be 
given to this Society. Further remarks on this sub- 
ject were made by Miss Sallie McCracken of the Mills 
Home. 

ADJOURNMENT 

29. The Association adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to 
reconvene at 1 :45 P. M. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 
DEVOTIONALS 

30. The Praise and Worship period was under the 
direction of Rev. Worth Grant, pastor of the Liberty 
Church. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE 
AND PREACHER 

31. The committee recommended the following, 
which was adopted: 

We recommend for your adoption the following: 

TIME— Tuesday, after the first Sunday in September— Sept. 8. 

PLACE— Liberty Baptist Church. 

PREACHER— I. G. Greer (Superintendent Mills Home). 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



ALTERNATE— B. A. Mitchell (Pastor Abbotts Creek, Wallburg 
Churches) . 

TIME— Wednesday, after the first Sunday in September— Sept. 9. 
PLACE— Abbotts Creek. 

PREACHER— To be selected by the program committee. (Mis- 
sionary or Doctrinal Sermon). 

FOR MUSIC LEADER— Cary J. Davis. 

E. C. ROACH, 
HUGH W AFFORD, 
WORTH GRANT, 
J. T. CARRICK, 
GILMER BECK, 
JNO. COPLEY 
P. A. MYERS, 

Committee. 



WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION 

32. The report on W. M. U. was prepared and 

brought by Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, of the Lexington 

Church. The report was discussed by Mrs. Gaines 
and was adopted. 

As we survey the work of the churches, we have a very incom- 
plete picture unless we consider what has been accomplished by the 
Woman's Missionary Union. There are twenty-eight churches in 
Liberty Association; twenty-two have a Missionary Society; seventeen 
of the twenty- two have at least one organization for the young peo- 
ple. Six churches have fully graded Unions, composed of Women's 
Missionary Society, Young Women's Auxiliary, Girls' Auxiliary, Royal 
Ambassadors, and Sunbeams. 

The membership of these organizations represents the most far- 
seeing groups in our churches. These are the ones who are carrying 
forward the torch of Christ at home and abroad. Through Mission 
Study our women and young people are: 

1 — Being informed as to the missionary opportunities in other 
lands ; 

2 — They are being inspired by biographies of pioneer missionaries 
as well as the living heroes of The Cross; 

3 — They are being instructed as to the Biblical teachings of a full 
stewardship; 

4 — They are studying the needs of the unsaved, how to approach 
them, and lead them to Christ and salvation; 

5 — They are exporing the teaching regarding effectual prayer; 

6 — The women are learning the best methods of leading and 
training our children for Christian service. 

Most significant of all is the fact that these women are practicing 
what they are studying. To them it is a God-given privilege to be 
good stewards of ability as well as money, to help the unfortunate 
ones — be that misfortune physical, — to pray believing, unselfish pray- 
ers of intercession, to train our children that they will be devout, 
consecrated, mission-minded men and women of tomorrow. 

Heeding the words of the Prophet, Isaiah — "Enlarge the place of 
thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitation: 
spare not, lengthen thy cords and strengthen thy stakes." (Isaiah 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



54.2), the women of Liberty Women's Missionary Union are stressing 
personal service and enlistment for the year 1941. We feel that if 
this is carried out, "His way will be known" more fully and His 
teachings translated into life around the encircling globe. 

The W. M. U.'s of three churches deserve special praise; for the 
first time the Reeds W. M. U. attained the fully graded A-1 Standard 
in 1940; New Friendship W. M. U. successfully maintained this 
standard for the seventh consecutive year. Mills Home W. M. U. 
secured a Missionary Offering from every resident, woman-church- 
member, and New Friendship — for the fourth consecutive year — se- 
cured a Missionary Contribution from every resident, woman-church- 
member. New Friendship holds a most unique position in the W. M. 
U. of the State for this double record of achievement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES. 



PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

33. The report on this subject was made by Rev. 
N. C. Teague, pastor of the Reeds and Churchland 
Churches. 

Believing that questions of public morals are first of all and 
primarily personal and local, the writer of this report reverts to the 
old name as given above, "Temperance and Public Morals." The con- 
dition of our country and of the world morally is increasingly bad. 
Sin in the hearts and lives of men — official and average citizen — will 
bring no other result. The making, sale, and drinking of intoxicat- 
ing drinks; the gambling craze; the non-observance and desecration 
of Sunday; the break-down of homes; Immorality; dishonesty and 
corruption in low and high places, all should call Christians to their 
knees in prayer and to their feet to courageously speak out, live, 
and do something for sobriety and purity. As citizens we have great 
responsibility at the polls, toward law enforcement, and toward creat- 
ing a right public opinion. 

The crux of the whole matter, however, is a right relationship 
with God through Jesus Christ. Before a man can build a Christian 
character in the sight of God he must be regenerated by the Spirit 
of God, and then, with God's grace and help he can go out to 
live and act publicly before his fellowman as he should. Our first 
move toward true temperance and public morals is leading men to 
salvation and consecration to God. Then, in our homes there should 
be a restoration of the sanctity of marriage, family worship, and 
emphasis on training as to Christian character, temperance, and 
righteousness. In our churches pastor, teachers, and all leaders 
should preach, teach, and live soberly and righteously. We cannot 
have much influence beyond our own doors until we live on a higher 
plane at home. We should demand a purer membership in all our 
churches. On our public schools we should persistently ask for and 
give cooperation in teaching and training for character and sobriety. 
Boys and gii^ls taught and trained properly in our homes, schools, 
and churches, truly converted and dedicated to God and His service, 
and willing to accept and discharge responsibility for temperance 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



and public morals can make real headway toward making the nation 
and world what it ought to be. They can become Christian leaders 
and officials; they can provide public opinion and solid support for 
every good cause. Peace, happiness, and abiding prosperity can 
come to us in this way and in no other. 

The writer feels that the report on Temperance and Public 
Morals should be given a place on the first day of the association 
next year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. TEAGUE. 

ADDRESS ON TEMPERANCE 

34. At this time Rev. V. H. Harrell, Repressenta- 
tive of the State Dry Forces, and Dr. I. G. Greer, Su- 
perintendent of the Mills Home, and Rev. R. H. Sat- 
terfield, Representative of the Biblical Recorder, de- 
livered short addresses on the evils of strong drink 
and other intemperate habits. 

SPECIAL COLLECTION 

35. A special collection was taken for the Dry 
Forces of North Carolina. The sum of $14.30 vv^as re- 
ceived and turned over to Rev. H. Harrell. 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

36. The report on B. T. U. was prepared and made 
by Miss Vessie Gillespie, Secretary of the First Church, 
Thomasville. It was adopted. 

Liberty Associational Training Union work has been under the 
direction of Mr. W. R. Eddinger and Miss Wilmateen Morris during 
the year 1940-41. Mr. Eddinger served as director until January, 1941, 
when he entered the United States Training Camp at Fort Bragg. 
At this time, Miss Morris, associate director of the association, 
took over the work and has done a splendid work. 

From a study of reports sent in by the individual churches of our 
Association we find that we have a total of 22 Training Unions with 
directors, a gain of one organization over last year. We have 18 
Adult Unions, 22 Young People's Unions, 24 Intermediate Unions, 24 
Junior Unions, and 12 Story Hours. Our gains for the year have 
been in the Adult and Junior organizations. This leads us to feel that 
cur need is for adults who will form Unions to train themselves to 
act as leaders for the younger groups. The total Training Union 
enrollment including Story Hours is 1,211 as compared to 1,329 of 
last year. We are losing in membership, which leads us to question 
whether or not we are making adequate provision for all age groups 
to be trained in Christian living for Christian service. We will not 
reach and hold in our churches any age group for which we do not 
provide a place and leader. We^ will not, as an Association, enlist 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



our young people and children in a program of training for service 
until the adults in our churches wake up to their need for training 
to meet the demands of leadership for our youth. 

Seven churches in the Association have no Training Union of 
any kind. This should be a challenge to the churches and associa- 
tional officers. Let us pray, work, and plan for a working organiza- 
tion in every church in our Association. This would ^mean that three 
churches would be responsible for the organization of one union dur- 
ing the year. Surely this is not too much to undertake. 

Only seven churchse have requested awards during 1941. A total 
of 196 awards for Training Work and Study Classes have been issued 
to this Association against a total of 803 awards during 1940. The 
decrease is perhaps due to the fact that we had an Associational En- 
largement Campaign in 1940. 196 awards issued to a membership 
of 1,211 leads one to ask if we are really doing our utmost to fit 
our members for service? Every growing union will be a union that 
studies. 

The Associational Training Union organization Is complete, but 
we need to remember that our officers cannot do anything worth- 
while unless every church cooperates in the work. We need to plan 
definitely the work of the Associational Training Union for a year 
in advance so that it will not conflict with other work being done 
and with the work of the various chui'ches. A yearly schedule of 
meetings and plans can and should be worked out. The members of 
our State and Southwide forces will help us to map out such plans 
at our one-day associational conference to be held November 24th 
at Thomasville First Church. Let every church in the Association 
be represented in this meeting and help in the planning. 

In Nehemiah 4:6 we find, "So built we the wall; for the people 
had a mind to work." Let us take this as our challenge this year. 
We have great possibilities, we have good leaders, and we can make 
this a great year of progress if we "have a mind to work." Let us 
open our eyes to the need, our hearts to God, and work. 

VESSIE GILLESPIE. 



MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

37. The report on Ministerial Relief was made by 
Rev. D. W. Digh, pastor of the Center Hill and Smith 
Grove Churches. 

Same was adopted. 

The Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion continues to supply, in so far as it is able, relief to aged 
ministers and their wives in North Carolina. There are now around 
50 men and 65 women from North Carolina being aided by the relief 
funds, the amount ranging from $9 to $30 per quarter. 

From the whole South the Relief and Annuity Board received 
for its work during the year January 1, 1939, through December 31, 
1939, $87,493.57, of which North Carolina furnished $7,868.16. During 
the same period the Board spent for relief benefits in the whole 
South $97,958.02, of which $7,828.45 was given to beneficiaries in 
North Carolina. 

The Ministers' and Church Employees' Retirement Plan for 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



pastors and full time church employees is now in its second year of 
operation in North Carolina. 

At this date, July 1, 1941, about 325 pastors and employees have 
become members, with around 300 of those with all payments made 
up to date. 

As of January, 1941, a few pastors of sixty-five and beyond 
retired and are now receiving monthly age annuities. One is receiv- 
ing around $35 a month as a disability benefit and another is in the 
process of being approved for such disability. 

This whole Plan is merely a common sense way of creating a 
fund in advance so that when a pastor becomes disabled or reaches 
the retirement age, which is sixty-five, he may retire knowing that 
an annuity has beers built up for him. The Plan is not so much 
designed to lay up money against a rainy day as it is to lay up 
something against that certain day that every man and woman 
must come to, the age of sixty-five. 

To be sure it costs something to build up such a fund. We can- 
not take out something we do not put in. The Plan is after all very 
simple. A pastor or church employee pays into the fund 4% of the 
salary received from church or churches; or he may enter the Plan 
and pay 3% or 2%, receiving, of course, a reduced benefit. Then 
the church, or churches, served pays into the fund an amount equiva- 
lent to the amount paid by the pastor. This money is invested, 
begins to draw interest, and thus the fund is increased. 

The Baptist State Convention, through agencies and committees, 
spent much time in trying to work out the Plan which in all respects 
is safe and sound. 

It only remains for pastors and churches to take advantage of 
this remarkably fine opportunity now offered. It is really the first 
time Baptists have undertaken to meet in an adequate way the 
situation of caring for our aged ministers. 

We would, therefore, recommend to all pastors and all churches 
that they enter the Plan at the earliest moment possible. Delay 
means reduced benefits in the end, the longer one remains out the 
more the benefit will be reduced. For churches that have budgets 
we recommend that the amount needed for the Retirement Plan 
be placed in the budget; for those churches not having budgets we 
recommend that sometime during the year a time be set when the 
people will be asked to bring their gifts for this purpose. 

In North Carolina we have 325 members; there should be at 
least three times that many. 

Respectfully submitted, 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE 
PERSONS TO BRING REPORTS NEXT YEAR 

38. This committee brought the following nomi- 
nation which was adopted. 

We recommend to the Association the following: 



NAME & OBJECT ADDRESS 

Baptist Hospitals — A. L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

B. T. U.— Miss Elizabeth Smith Rt. 1, Lin wood, N. C. 

Christian Education— C. M. Wall, Sr., Lexington, N. C 

Home Missions — Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 



MINUTES OF THE 



Foreign Missions— Rev. B. A. Mitchell Rt. 1, Kernersville 

State Missions — Rev. L. S. Gaines Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home— Rev. N. C. Teague Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C 

Public Morals & Law Enforcement — Rev. J. A. McMillan, Thomasville 

Religious Literature — Rev. Worth Grant High Point, N. C. 

Digest of Church Letters and State 

of the Churches — ^Rev. J. A. Neilson : Thomasville 

Ministerial Relief — Dr. W. K. McGee Thomasville 

Sunday Schools — C. F. Motsinger Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

W. M. U.— Mrs. A. F. Warfford Rt. 6, Lexington 

N. C. TEAGUE, 
C. M. WALL, 
H. M. STROUP, 
E. F. EAGLE, 
A. L. SNIDER, 

Committee. 



REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

e38. The Resolutions Committee offered the follow- 
ing, which was adopted: 

On behalf of the Liberty Baptist Association we wish to extend 
to the people of New Friendship Church and community deep grati- 
tude for your hospitality and fellowship while here. Also for the 
fine meal served to us. 

Respectfully yours, 
J. A. COX, 
C. S. YOUNG. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

40. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer of the Association, of- 
fered his report, which was adopted. 

Receipts For The 1940 Session 



To Amount Collected for 1940 Minute Fund $186.15 

Disbursements 

By Paid Balance Due Clerk on 1939 Account $ 8.35 

By Paid For Clerical Help $ 5.00 

By Paid Postage $ 7.85 

By Paid Dispatch, Printing Minutes $130.00 

By Paid Myself as Clerk for 1940 $ 34.00 



Totals $185.20 

Balance on Hand $ .95 



$186.15 



SAM J. SMITH, 

Treasurer 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO PROGRAM 
COMMITTEE 

41. The following resolution was offered and 
adopted : 

We recommend that the Program Committee consist of the of- 
ficers of the Association, pastors of the entertaining churches and 
three persons, named by the moderator during the session of the 
Association. 

L. J. MATTHEWS, 
T. W. BRAY, 

SALLiE Mccracken. 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO MESSENGERS 

42. Rev. W. K. McGee offered a resolution as fol- 
lows, which was adopted: 

That the names of Messengers printed in the min- 
utes include only those actually attending the Associa- 
tion from the delegations elected by the churches. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 
AND ADJOURNMENT 

43. The Association stands in honor of our mem- 
bers, who have died during the last year. 

As the Body stands. Rev. J. A. Neilson reads some 
verses from the 14th chapter of John, and after this 
the list of deceased members, during these readings 
Carey Davis rendered softly at the piano ''Bless Be 
The Tie That Binds." 

Closing prayer by Dr. W. K. McGee. 

For list of deceased members see page 40. 

Adjournment. 

R. D. Covington, Sam J. Smith, 

Moderator. Clerk. 



MINUTES OF AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

Meeting at times other than that of The Associa- 
tion and adopted to be included in the Minutes of 
The Association. 



32 



MINUTES OF THE 



PROCEEDINGS 

W. M. U. OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1940 



The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association met with 
Denton Baptist Church, April 18, 1941. The meeting was called to 
order by the Superintendent, Mrs. L. S. Gaines, who presided over 
the program during the day. The opening hymn was "Jesus Saves.'' 
The Devotional was given by Mrs. C. C. Coppedge of First Church. 
Thomasville. The Theme of the program was "Our Continuing 
Task— That Thy Way May Be Known"; Psalm 67:1-2. Words ol 
welcome were extended by Mrs. Ben Carroll of the Denton Church 
and Mrs. C. A. Smith gave an appropriate response. 

Reports of Associational Officers: 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

Last year we reported 46 societies in 18 churches. This year 
we are able to report 57 societies in 20 churches — a gain of 11 societies 
and 2 churches. Number reporting this year — W. M. S. 18, Y. W. A 
13, R. A. 11, Sunbeams 8. Some of the kinds of Personal Service 
done: Working in Mission Sunday Schools, holding Cottage Prayer 
Meetings, Rescue Work, helping needy families, work for under- 
privileged children, work for negroes, work for prisoners, Vacation 
Bible Schools, holding services for negroes in institutions and in 
prisons, caring for church grounds, helping in song service, gifts to 
Mills Home and to Baptist Hospital. 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD, Chairman. 



STEWARDSHIP 

Two churches secured gifts from every resident woman member. 
Number of New Tithers— W. M. S. 39, Y. W. A. 4, G. A. 8, R. A. 4, 
Sunbeams 11. 

Total No. of Tithers— W. M. S. 119, Y. W. A. 24, G. A. 35, R. A. 19, 
S. B. 57. 

Stewardship Classes— W M. S. 12, Y. W. A. 12, G. A. 2, R. A. 3, 
S. B. 3. 

Young People using leaflets— Y. W. A. 3, G. A. 4, R. A. 3, S. B. 2 
100,000 Club Memberships— W. M. S. 37, Y. W. A. 16, G. A. 3, 
R. A. 0, S. B. 0. 

. MRS. P. M. HENDRICKS, Chairman. 



MISSION STUDY 

Number of Pioneer Classes— G. A. 1, R. A. 1, S. B. 1. 
Number of Classes Held— W. M. S. 59, Y. W. A. 13, G. A. 8, R. A, 
10, S. B. 8. 

Number Members Enrolled in Classes— W. M. S. 672, Y. W. A. 
63, G. A. 118, R. A. 96, S. B. 131. 

Number W. M. S. Record Cards— No. I, 51, No. II, 9. 
Number W. M. S. Seals— Silver 477, gilt 10, Official 2. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



Number W. M. S. Certificates: for Official Seals 2, Honor 2, 
Continuation 26. 

Number of W. M. S. Reading Card^ 15, Stamps for Reading 
Cards 53. 

Number Certificates— Y. W. A. 18, G. A. 38, R. A. 42, S. B. 61. 
Number Seals— Y. W. A. 24, G. A. 46, R. A. 31, S. B. 72. 
Number of Stewardship Books Studied — 14. 
Total Number of Books Studied— 28. 
Held one Mission Study Institute. 

MRS. I. G. GREER, Chairman. 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

If you are an informed Baptist, you are most likely to be an 
interested Baptist; and an interested Baptist is usually an active 
Baptist. 

Most of om- information in regard to our Baptist work comes to 
us through the medium of our Christian literature. This provides us 
with a constant source of valuable material which challenges us 
with the large task that is ours at home and abroad, and yet which 
deepens the devotional and doctrinal life. 

Such magazines as the Biblical Recorder, Southern Baptist Home 
Missions, the Commission, Royal Service, World Comrades and The 
Window render a three- fold service. They serve the Home by 
quietly teaching the importance of spiritual things, by laying worthy 
foundations for spiritual building, and by helping to guide and 
shape the thoughts and ideals of growing youth. They serve the 
church by teaching Baptist doctrine, by emphasizing the importance 
of evangelism and missions, and by keeping alive the spirit of Baptist 
freedom and democracy. They serve the denomination by promoting 
mutual understanding and spiritual unity, and by keeping before our 
people vital facts of Baptist progress and achievement at home and 
abroad. 

In the light of all this, therefore, I would strongly urge that our 
women not only read this literature themselves, but that they seek to 
encourage others to read it also. 

MRS. J. A. NEILSON, Chairman. 

A very important feature of the program for the morning was 
the address of Miss Mary Currin, State Young People's Leader. Miss 
Currin is deeply interested in all phases of W. M. U. work and is a 
great source of information. Next on the program was the roll call 
which revealed 16 churches represented with 80 representatives. We 
appreciated the presence of a number of the pastors of the churches 
of the Association. The Superintendent acknowledged the presence 
of Mrs. B. K. Mason, Superintendent of the Greensboro Division, who 
spoke briefly of the work of the W. M. U. and urged the women to 
attend the Divisional Meeting in Asheboro in October. 

The Superintendent gave her report, discussing each point briefly 
with a note of encouragement for the things which have been ac- 
complished and at the same time impressing us with the fact that 
there is yet much to be done. 



34 



MINUTES OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
I— HONOR ROLL 



W. M. S. — (A-D— New Friendsip, Reeds; (B) Churchland, Er- 
langer, Lexington First, Mills Home, Reid Street; (C) Denton, Thom- 
asville First, Wallburg. 

Y. W. A. — (A-1) Holloways, New Friendship, Reeds; (B) Mills 
Home, Thomasville First. 

G. A.— (A-1) Naomi Schell (Mills Home), Int. & Junior (New 
Friendship), Reeds, Junior (Thomasville First; (B) Alda Grayson 
(Mills Home); (C) Jr. & Int. (Lexington First, Lockett (Mills Home), 
Intermediate (Thomasville First). 

R. A.— (A-1) Jr., (Denton), Int. & Jr., (New Friendship) Reeds; 
(B) Jr. (Erlanger); (C) Int. (Erianger), Vance (Mills Home) Thom- 
asville First. 

S. B. — (A-1) Mills Home, New Friendship, Reeds Thomasville 
First; (C) Lexington First. 

II— FULLY GRADED UNIONS 

Erlanger New Friendship 

Lexington First Reeds 
Mills Home Thomasville First 



III— 1940 FINANCIAL RECORD 

Co-operative Program Other Objects Totals 



First Quarter $1,139.67 $ 642.67 $1,782.34 

Second Quarter $1,087.74 $ 692.46 $1,779.20 

Third Quarter $ 980.12 $ 652.42 $1,632.54 

Fourth Quarter $1,171.68 $1,743.59 $2,915.27 



Totals $4,379.21 $3,731.14 $8,110.35 



Apportionment for Cooperative Program for 1940 $4,391.20 

Raised for Co-operative Program for 1940 $4,379.21 

$ 11.09 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Receipts : 

In Treasury January 1, 1940 $18.06 

Received during 1940 $26.05 



Total receipts $44.11 $44.11 

Disbursements : 

April 19, To Miss Elizabeth Hale, Expense $ 8.00 

April 27, To Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Postage $ 5.00 

May 6, To Miss Sallie McCracken, Expense $ 5.00 

July 5, To Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Expense $ 5.00 



Total $26.00 $26.00 



Balance In Treasury, January 1, 1941 $18.11 



MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Treasurer. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



After the appointment of committees, meeting was adjourned 
for lunch. 

The afternoon session began with a hymn, "O Zion Haste." Rev. 
H. M. Stroup conducted the devotionals in which "Witnessing" was 
emphasized. The union voted that a card of appreciation to be sent 
to Mrs. W. T. Harris, president of the Denton W. M. S., who was ill. 
A committee composed of Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Mrs. C. C. Eddinger. 
and Mrs. J. W. Tuttle was appointed to make a recommendation at 
the meeting next year as to whether the hostess church would serve 
lunch or whether each delegate would bring her own lunch. 

Reports of committees: 

TIME AND PLACE 

We, the committee on time and place, recommend that the W. 
M. U. of the Liberty Association meet with Holloways Baptist Church 
in April 1942. 

MRS. E. C. ROACH, 
MRS. J. W. TUTTLE, 
MRS. LOOKABILL, 

Committee. 

RESOLUTIONS 

The committee on resolutions, on behalf of the W. M. U. of Lib- 
erty Association, wish to express our appreciation for your Christian 
hospitality, in the use of your lovely church and the delicious and 
bountiful lunch. 

We are happy indeed, to have had with us Miss Mary Currin, 
State Young People's Leader, and Mrs. B. K. Mason, our Divisional 
Leader. 

Thanks to all who have had a part in making this truly a day 
of information and inspiration which will be long remembered by 
those who attended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. GRAHAM BARNES, 
MRS. Z. V. FULBRIGHT, 
MRS. C. C. EDDINGER, 

Committee. 

NOMINATION OF OFFICERS 

Superintendent — ^Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 
Associate Superintendent— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Route 5, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

Young People's Leader— Mrs. N. C. Teague, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C 
Personal Service — Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C 
Mission Study — ^Mrs. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. 
Stewardship — ^Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 
Training School — Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, Welcome, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. R. S. GREEN, 
MRS. RALPH CRAVER, 
MRS. ROBERT HARTMAN. 



36 



MINUTES OP THE 



IN MEMORIAM 

As the years come and go we are called upon again and again 
to mourn the loss of loved and faithful workers in our W. M. U. 
Since our meeting a year ago several of our members have passed 
into the Great Beyond, and it is fitting that we pause for a little 
while and pay tribute to their memory. We cannot' know nor under- 
stand the leading of "God's mighty hand" but, we do know that 
cur loss is their gain. In honor of these we place flowers today 
in our Memoral Wreath: 

Churchland — Mrs. Maude Owen, Mrs. J. H. Hilliard, Mrs. Mary 
Leonard. 

Jersey — Mrs. A. L. Smith. 

Thomasville First — ^Mrs. Avery Bowers. 

Lexington First — ^Mrs. G. W. Walser. 

This service was in charge of Miss Roxie Sheets. Miss Sallie 
McCracken led in prayer. 

The program was then placed in charge of the Young People's 
Leader, Mrs. N. C. Teague. An inspirational talk was given by Mrs. 
A. C. Mccormick, who emphasized the importance of child training 

LEADER'S REPORT 

Number of new organizations— Y. W. A. 1, G. A. 1, R. A. 1, S. B. 2. 

Number of organizations doing personal service — ^Y. W. A. 11. 
G. A. 14, R. A. 8, S. B. 5. 

Number of Tithers— Y. W. A. 41, G. A. 65, R. A. 25, S. B. 95. 

Number observing Week of Prayer: 

State Missions— Y. W. A. 10, G. A. 14, R. A. 10, S. B. 6. 

Foreign— Y. W. A. 9, G. A. 13, R. A. 9, S. B. 4. 

Home— Y. W. A. 7, G. A. 13, R. A. 9, S. B. 5. 

Number of World Comrades taken: 87— Window of Y. W. A. 43 

Number of A-1 organizations— Y. W. A. 5, G. A. 10, R. A. 8, S. B. 5. 

Twice during the year we have held conferences endeavoring 
better organization of our young people's work, to reach out and 
help the churches in our association which have no young people's 
work. For the year 1941 we hope to have better conferences. We 
want to stress this year: 1. Have better prepared leaders. We must 
he alert to lead young people today. Lay new emphasis on corre- 
spondence courses for counselors. 2. Meetings designed to give mis- 
sionary inspu'ation and to strengthen the organizations — Focus 
Weeks, House Parties, Conclaves, and Camps. 3. Better fostering— 
To all W. M. S. presidents, I make an appeal to urge your women to 
foster the Junior Organizations: Y. W. A., G. A., R. A., S. B. 

Sincerely yours, 

MRS. N. C. TEAGUE. 

Rev. N. C. Teague spoke briefly of his work as leader of the R. A 
bands and of the great possibilities in the lives of these boys when 
properly influenced. 

In closing, the Denton W. M. S. and young people led by the 
pastor of the church, Rev. H. M. Stroup, brought out a great mis- 
sionary thought with a playlet. 

Rev. N. C. Teague led in closing prayer. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 
ASSOCIATION 



The Sunday School Division of the Liberty Baptist Association 
met at the First Baptist Church in Thomasville, March 9, 1941, at 
2:30 P. M. The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent. 
C. F. Motsinger, who introduced Rev. W. Perry Crouch and L. L. 
Morgan of the Sunday School Division of the Baptist State Conven- 
tion. Mr. Crouch led the devotional after the congregation sang the 
song, "Work for the Night is Coming." He then led in prayer. 

L. L. Morgan, State Sunday School Secretary, presented the 
Five-Year Program just ending, and the Four- Year Program just 
beginning with Southern Baptists. He listed the objectives. 

Definite goals for the Four- Year Program were then discussed 
by Mr. Crouch, outlining the plan of work for Sunday Schools of the 
Southern Baptist Convention churches. 

A count of the delegates from the churches in the Association 
was taken, showing 115 to be present, representing 18 churches in 
the Association. 

Goals for the year were given by Mr. Motsinger, Superintendent. 

Mr. Crouch then presented "A Platform of Progress," in which 
he challenged us with this thought, "Do we have enough consecration 
for the service required?" 

The Superintendent announced the resignation of Mrs. Paul 
Palmer, Beginner Superintendent. 

Recognition of the Associational Officers present was made by 
Mr. Morgan and a demonstration given, showing the duties of each. 

Conferences for the different departments were led by the fol- 
lowing: Extension and Adults, W. Perry Crouch; Pastors and General 
Superintendents, L. L. Morgan; Young People, Intermediates and 
Juniors, John B. Lane; Primaries, Beginners and Cradle Roll, Miss 
Texie Sowers. 

A report of the conferences was presented by representatives of 
each department. 

Goals read by Mr. Motsinger were adopted as Sunday School 
Associational Goals for the year 1941. 

The meeting was dismissed with prayer by Mr. CM. Wall. 

C. F. MOTSINGER, 
Superintendent. 

ILA L. HENSLEY, 
Secretary. 

The Sunday School Division of the Liberty Baptist Association 
met at the Welcome Baptist Church, July 6, 1941, at 2:30 P. M. The 



38 



MINUTES OF THE 



meeting was called to order by the Superintendent, C. F. Motsinger. 
The songs "Trust and Obey" and "Higher Ground" were sung. The 
devotional was conducted by Raymond Wilson form the New Friend- 
ship Church, who used Psalm 25 and lead in prayer. 

The roll call was made and 13 churches were found to be repre- 
sented with an attendance of 70. 

A nominating committee was appointed as follows: R. D. Cov- 
ington, chairman, E. C. Roach and Mr. Woodleaf. 

C. V. Teague, E. L. Davis, and C. C. Eddinger werci appointed 
to consider the following invitations for the next meeting: Erlanger, 
Sheets Memorial, Center Hill, and Churchland. The invitation to 
meet with Churchland was reported by the committee. 

The leaders for the conferences were as follows: Cradle Roll, 
Mrs. Black; Beginners and Primaries, Miss Elizabeth Brogdon; Jun- 
iors, Miss Myra Olive; Intermediates, Cabell Philpott, Young People, 
Miss Vessie Gillespie; Adults, Mrs. M. Smith; Superintendents and 
Pastors, Mr. C. F. Motsinger, 

Reports from the departmental conferences were made by the 
leaders. 

The inspirational address was given by Mr. Smith Hagaman, 
Superintendent of the Baptist Hospital. His subject was "The Op- 
portunity of a Sunday School Teacher." The opportunities that he 
listed were Preparation, Attendance, Teaching from the Bible, In- 
spiration, and a well prepared lesson. 

c. F. motso:nger, 

Superintendent. 

ILA L. HENSLEY, 
Secretary. 



MINUTES OF ASSOCIATIONAL TRAINING UNION MEETINGS 
Held August 19401 Through July 1941 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its first quarterly 
meeting with the Reeds Baptist Church on September 29, 1940. 

Mr. Pate Stewart conducted the devotional, his subject being. 
'Nations That Turn Away Fom God." 

The Reeds Male Chorus sang, "Lead Me On Lord." 

The Attendance Banner was won by the Reeds Training Union 
with 75% present. 

The following officers were elected: Miss Wilmatine Morris, Den- 
ton, N. C, Associate Director; Miss Ruth Everhart, Director of Group 
3; Miss Eunice Wood, Thomasville, N. C, Assistant Secretary. 

The Place Committee reported Center Hill as the place of next 
meeting, December 29. 

The motion was made and carried that we send a representative 
to our Southwide Training Union Conference in Memphis the latter 
part of December. 

The Inspirational Message was brought by Rev. C. C. Eddinger. 

Closing prayer was led by W. R. Eddinger. 



MRS. EUNICE WOOD, Acting Secretary. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



The Liberty Associational Training Union held its second meeting 
of the year on December 29, 1940, at 2:30 o'clock, with the Center 
Hill Baptist Church. 

The Devotional, "Looking Toward the New Year," was given by 
Rubye Connell. 

Special music was rendered by the Mills Home Trio. 

Minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. 

In the business session, the resignation of Rubye Connell as 
Secretary-Treasurer was read and accepted. Miss Vessie Gillespie, 
of Thomasville Firt Church, was elected as her successor. Mr. Ed- 
dinger appointed Miss Gillespie to attend the Training Union Con- 
ference in Memphis, Tennessee, the latter part of December and 
first of January, in his stead, with expenses paid by the Association 

The Place Committee reported Reed Street Church, Thomasville, 
as the place of next meeting. 

The Attendance Banner was awarded to the Center Hill Union. 

Miss Ila Hensley of Lexington First Church, substituting for her 
pastor, gave the inspirational talk of the afternoon on, "Why Belong 
to a Training Union and How Can We Be Better Members in 1941?" 

Mr. Eddinger led the closing prayer. 

RUBYE CONNELL, Secretary. 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its third meeting 
of the year 1941, June 29 at Reid Street Baptist Church at 2:30 
o'clock. Miss Wilmateen Morris, presiding. 

The Devotional, "The Grace of Faith," was given by Mrs. V. K. 
Skeen, of Denton. 

A discussion of the goals set for the Association by the group on 
tour in April was discussed by Mr. Snider, of Denton. Goals for 
this Association being: 12 Adult Unions, 10 Young People's Unions, 
8 Intermediate Unions, 8 Junior Unions, 15 Story Hours. 

A committee to recommend officers for the coming year was 
appointed by Miss Morris. A report to be brought by this committee 
at the August meeting. 

Special music was brought by Mr. Carey Davis. 

A message entitled "Preparing to Proclaim the Gospel," was 
brought by Miss Kanoy of Rich Fork Church. Mrs. Coppedge brought 
a message on "The Rewards of Proclaiming the Gospel." 

The Attendance Banner was awarded to Abbotts Creek church. 
The place committee reported Liberty as the next place of meeting. 

Meeting was dismissed with prayer led by Rev. Worth Grant. 

VESSIE GILLESPIE, Secretary. 



40 



MINUTES OF THE 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call Since 
Our Last Session. 



"In My Father^s House Are Many Mansions. I Go 
to Prepare a Place For You" — John 14-2 



ABBOTTS CREEK— Miss Banks Teague, Deacon J. R. Phillips, 
Mrs. Ada Orrell, Mr. J. B. Rothrock, Mrs. Ruth Martin. 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. E. Z. Smith. 
CENTER HILL— Mr. E. B. Jarrett, Mrs. Bettie J. Wilson. 
CHURCHLAND— Mr. Horace Simmerson, Mrs. Mary Leonard. 
DENTON— Mr. L. W. Snider. 

ERLANGER— Mr. T. W. Tiller. Mr. C. T. Kins€y. 
KOLLOWAYS— Miss Tilda Dickens, Mr. John Cross, Mrs. Fan- 
nie Bailey. 

JERSEY— Mr. B. F. Roach. Mrs. L. A. Smith, Deacon W. C. 
Roach. 

LEXINGTON— Mr. H. I. Lopp, Mr. E. O. Webster, Mr. H. C. 
Davis, Mr. H. L. Leonard. Mrs. Lilley B. Maley, Mr. E. 
R. Lanning, Sr.. Mrs. G. W. Miller, Mrs. C. W. Trice. 
Mr. J. Y. Morris, Mrs. J. R. Michael, Mrs. C. M. 
Wall, Sr. 

LIBERTY — Pastor Farrei F. James, Mrs. Emma Hannah, Mrs. 

Mary J. Miller, Mr. Fred Watford. 
LICK CREEK— Mrs. A. L. Taylor. 
MILLS HOME— Master Darrell Everett. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mr. Frank Rights, Mrs. Nancy Jane 
Welch. 

PLEASANT PLAINS— Mr. Fate Loflin. 

RICH FORK— Mr. Carlos Stout, Mr. George Mallard, Mr. Ros- 

co Younts, 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mr. Will F. Cole. 
SOUTHSIDE— Mr. C. L. Matthews. 

SMITH GROVE — Miss Barbara Lanning, Mrs. Minnie Lanning, 
Mr. J. B. Brewer, Mr. T. H. La&siter, Deacon A. A. 
Young. 

STONERS GROVE— Mr. W. P. Stoner. 

SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. Sarah Bean, Mrs. Sarah Carroll, Mr. 
Earlie Gallimore, Mr. Leach Davis. 

THOMASVILLE FIRST— Mrs. D. K. Winter, Mrs. A. N. Bow- 
ers, Mr. Farris Bray, Mr. J. F. Marlow, Deacon Z. V. 
Crutchfield. 

WALLBURG— Deacon Charlie R. Dodson, Mr. John W. Craven, 
Mr. Rex Willard. 

WALTERS GROVE— Mr. J. A. Gallimore. 

WELCOME— Mr. L. G. Love. Jr. 

J. A. NEILSON, B. F. MITCHELL, 
STUART HEELER, H. H. BARNES, 
MRS. PATE LOPLIN, 
REV. J. M. PICKLER, Committee. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 
oi<i)vim:i) >iimstki{s hoi.ijiac; mk>ibi:hshii' ix thk 

l.inKltTY BAPTIST ASSOC lATIOX 



Name 



Addr 



( "hurt'h 



Work 



Bray, T. \V. 
Britt, N. F. 
Caldwell, R. N. 
Combs, J. A. 
Cox, J. A. 
Digh, D. W. 
Eag-le, E. T. 
Edding-er, C. C. 
Flowe, T. B. 
Gaines, Louis S. 
Gallimore, A. R. 
Grant, Worth 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Hopkins, Paul C 
Hunt. Howard 
Lanning-, Otis 
McMillan, J. A. 
McGee, W. K. 
Matthews, L. J. 
Mitchell, B. A. 
Mumford, E. F. 
Neilson, J. A. 
Newton, J. D. 
Tickler, J. M. 
T'ickler, C. L. 
Roach, E. C. 
Snider, S. G. 
Williamson, W. 
Young-. Chas. S. 
Stroup. H. M. 



Thoniasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Tioy, N. C. 

Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 
Thoniasville, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 4 
Salisbury, N. C 
Welcome, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C. 
In China 

High Point, N. C. 
China Grove, N. C. 
China Grove, N. C. 
Denton, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thoniasville, N. C. 
'i'liomasville, N. C. 
W. -Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
Kernersville, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Wingate, N. C. 
Albemarle, N. C. 
Erlanger, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Denton, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C- 
Lexington, N. C. 



liich Fork 
Southside 
Taylors Grove 
Reeds 

Carolina Avenue 

Center Hill 

.Jersey 

Welcome 

Lick Creek 

r^exington 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Walters Grove 
Walters Grove 
Pleasant Plains 
Reid Street 
Mills Home 
Thomasville 
New Friendship 
Wallburg 
Abbotts Creek 
Mills Home 
Thomasville 
Taylors Grove 
Summerville 
Erlanger 
Southside 
Denton 

Walters Grove 
Sheets Memorial 



Pastor 

Inactive 

Inactive 

Inactive 

Pastor 

Pastor 

} 'as tor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

I 'as tor 

Missionary 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Inactive 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Editor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Inactive 

Pastor 

Retired 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Inactive 

Pastor 



ASSIS'I'AXTS TO I'ASTORS OR KDrrATIOVAT. DIRKCTORS 



Hensley, Miss Ila 
Gillesjiie, Miss Vessie 



Address 



Lexington, 
Thomasville, 



Church 



Lexington 
Thomas^-il 



AVork 



(Miurch Secretary 
(^liurch Secretary 



.niMSTKRS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 



Name 



Hopkins, Paul 
Williamson. W. D. 



Address 



China Grove, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 



Church Ordained By 



Walters Grove 
Walters Grove 



1»RESIDP:\TS of liOCAI. BROTHERHOODS 





Adflre.ss 


Clniroh 


Mr. James Newman 


Winston-Salem, N. C, R. 5 


New Friendship 



42 MINUTES OF THE 



CHOIR DIRECTORS 

CHURCH Name and Address 

Abbotts Creek Carey Davis 

Carolina Avenue Willie Gilliam, Thomasville, N. C, 

Center Hill None 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Kesler, Lexington, N. C. 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton, N. C. 

Erlanger Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger, N. C. 

Holloways G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Jersey R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Lexington Mrs. H. E. Hilton, Lexington, N. C. 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

Lick Creek Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, High Rock, N. C. 

New Friendship Robert Hartman, Winston -Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Mills Home W. B. Lord, Thomasville, N. C. 

Mountain View C. P. Carrick, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Oak Hill Memorial J. C. Creed, Thomasville, N. C. 

Pleasant Plains Rev. H. T. Hunt, Denton, N. C. 

Reeds E. G. Fritts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Reid Street J. A. Martin, Thomasville, N, C. 

Rich Fork Wilbur Lewis, High Point, N. C. 

Sheets Memorial Spurgeon Ayers, Lexington, N. C. 

Smith Grove Mrs. Alma Lassiter, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Southside Isolene Byerly, Thomasville, N. C. 

Stoners Grove Mrs. Ruth Miller, Southmont, N. C 

Summerville Mrs. Emma Carrick, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1 

Thomasville Mrs. Alva Boyles, Thomasville, N. C. 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Roy Owens, New London, N. C. 

Wallburg Claud Cook, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Walters Grove Miss Mamie Lee Gallimore, Lexington, Rt. 2 

Welcome None 



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50 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



1832 

1834 
1835 
183G 
183: 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1S42 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
18 4!) 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1850 
18G0 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
186 5 
1866 
1S67 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1870 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



WHERE MET. I) 



IJamestovvn 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Ijiberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting- H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Keeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

3Big- Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendshi]) 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Hig-h Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

Summerville 

Lexing-ton 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 

Hig-h Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant drove 

Denton 
SPiney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexing-ton 

Lick Creek 



irREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
\Vm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
\Vm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stoke.s 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wing-ate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Car rick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. AV. Reinhait 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H." Thompson 
O. F. Greg-ory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 

Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
VV. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
101 i Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin l^anier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
VVm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
Ff. Morten 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. 'turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. 'I'uriier 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azai-iah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah "W^illiams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AA'illiams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
By Civil AVar 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. IL Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. TI. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



52 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr WHERE HELD 



iyo3 

1904 
1905 
1906 
19 07 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
19 20 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
19 2G 
1927 
1928 
] 9 20 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
]934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
193 8 
1939 
1940 
1941 



Jersey 

!Pine Meeting- H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wall burg- 
Denton 
Li berty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creelv 
Stoners Gro\e 
Rich Fork 
Hollowa vs 
Center Hill 
Wallbui-g 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendsliip 

Churchland 

Summerville 

Abbotts Ci-ee]< 

Reeds 

Liberty 

Rich Fork 

Thomasville 

Holloways 

Stoners Grove 

Abbotts Creek 

Denton 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 

Jersey 

Mills Home 

Reeds 

Churchland 

Denton 
Wall burg 
Center Hill 
New Friendship 



PREACHER 



W. A. Smith 
(ieo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
r. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardawav 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 

G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 

J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 

H. M. Stroupe 
L. S. Gaines 

N C. Teague 



MODERATOR 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
(). A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
G. W. Miller 
R. D. Covington 
W. D. Covington 
R- D. Covington 



CLERK 



iieiiry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
!'. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
1^. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



Liberty Baptist Association 

Norfh Carolina 
1942 



One Hundred and Tenth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

LIBERTY BAPTIST CHURCH 

THOMASVILLE, N. C, Rt. 2 

AND 

ABBOTTS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

HIGH POINT, N. C, Rt. 2 
September 8fh and 19^2 



The next Session will be held September 7th and 6fh, 1943 

y/'iih the 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
LEXINGTON, N. C. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



Norfh Carolina ^ 
1942 

1 



One Hundred and Tenth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

LIBERTY BAPTIST CHURCH 

THOMASVILLE, N. C, Rt. 2 
AND 

ABBOTTS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

HIGH POINT. N. Rt. 2 
September 8fh and 94i, 1942 



The next Session will be held September 7+h and 84fi, 1943 

wi4i the 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
LEXINGTON, N. C. 



INDEX 



Addresses 13-19-22-30-33 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 50 

Auxiliaries — Associational 40 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

B. T. U. Associational Meetings 48 

Biblical Recorder Representatives 24 

Church Clerks 56 

Church Treasurers 57 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3 

Executive 38 

Appointed by the Moderator 9-14 

Standing 4 

Constitution and By-Laws 6 

Deceased Members 39-49 

Directories: Associational 3 

Church 50 

Ordained Ministers 50 

Choir 51 

Election of Officers 23 

Historical Table 59-60 

Messengers 5 

Mission Sunday Schools Admitted 24-38 

New Pastors ....15 

Officers 3 

Order of Business 10 

Orphanage Representative 24 

Pastors of Association 52 

Proceedings Associational 9 

Reports: American Bible Society 28 

Committee on Obituaries 39-49 

B. T. U 39-48-54 

Com.mittee on Nominations of Officers 24 

Committee on Resolutions 38 

Committee on Nomination of Reporters 36 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 34 

Committee on Finance 37 

Digest of Church Letters 20 

Foreign Missions 18 

Home Missions 17 

Hospitals 12 

Education 24 

Mills Home 27 

Ministerial Reliefs 33 

Public Morals 31 

State Missions 16 

Sunday Schools 22 

Treasurers 37 

W. M. U. Work 30-40-55 

Resolutions 11-14-21-35-36 

Standing 7 

Sunday School Associational Meetings 46 

Statistical Tables 52-58 

Sermon, Annual 14-29 

Special Collection 33 

Sunday School Superintendents 53 

Visitors 15 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, Moderator Denton, N. C. 

C. C. Wall, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 



PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Name Church and Address 

J. A. Neilson, Chairman Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek, High Point, N. C. R. 2 

B. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue, Thomasville, N. C. 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill, Lexington, N, C, Rt. 1. 

L. E. Rickard Churchland, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 2 

A. L. Snider Denton, Denton, N. C. 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger, Erlanger, N. C. 

G. C. Palmer Holloways, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

H. L. Palmer Jersey, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

C. M. Wall, Sr. Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

B. J. May Liberty, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2, 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek, High Rock, N. C. 

C. F. Motsinger New Friendship, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

I. G. Greer Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

P. M. Smith Pleasant Plains, Denton, N. C. 

J. C. Leonard Reeds, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

Millard Wilson Reid Street, Thomasville, N. C. 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial, Lexington, N. C. 

E. W. Koonts Smith Grove, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove, Southmont, N. C. 

L. C. Carrick Summerville, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, Thomasville, N. C. 

Add Cranford Taylors Grove, New London, N. C. 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg, Wallburg, N. C. 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2. 

M. L. Craver Welcome, Welcome, N. C. 



The Moderator, Clerk amd all Pastors of the Association being Ex 
Officio memibers. (See Page 13 of 1933 Minutes.) 



ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. H. M. Stroup Denton, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Rev. J. A. Neilson Thomasville, N. C. 

Rev. N. C. Teague Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

C. V. Teague Wallburg, N. C. 

Rev. L. J. Matthews Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

Rev. B. A. Mitchell Kernersville, N. C, Rt. 1. 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, OR OTHER PAID EMPLOYES 
None. 



4 



MINUTES OP THE 



STANDINGf COMMITTEES 

None. 

ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 

W. M. U. Convention 

Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Superintendent Lexington, N. C. 

C. C. Coppage, Assistant Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. C. M. Howell, Secretary and Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. Reid Smith, Personal Service Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

Mrs. N. C. Teague, Young Peoples Leader .... Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 
Annual meeting was held April 30, 1942. See page 40. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

C. F. Motsinger, General Supt Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

Miss Ila Hensley, Secretary Lexington, N. C. 

Meetings were held October 1, 1941, January 4, 1942, and March 
6, 1942. See page 46. 

B. T. U. CONVENTION 

Wilbur Lewis, President High Point, N. C, Rt. 2. 

Mrs. James Keams, Secretary Denton, N. C. 

Meetings were held November 30, 1941, March 29, 1942, and May 
31, 1942. See page 48. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE BROTHERHOOD 

None. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS 
OF THE ASSOCIATION 

The MUls Home 
Thomasville, N. C. 



I. G. Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

B. W. Spillman, Chairman Committee Kinston, N. C. 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 

OFFICERS BAPTIST SCHOOLS STATE BOARDS 
AND INSTITUTIONS 

Residin^gr Within the Association 

L. A. Martin, Trustee, Meredith College Lexington, N. C. 

Louis S. Gaines, Member General Board Lexington, N. C. 

Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

W. K. McGee, Trustee Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Trustee Mars Hill College Lexington, N. C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. McMillan, Trustee Wake Forest College Thomasville, N. C. 

C. C. Wall, Trustee Mills Home Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. Neilson, Member General Board Thomasville, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 

ABBOTTS CREEK — Carey J. Davis, Miss Minnie Hayworth, D. S. 
Hayworth, Charley Davis, Andrew Bodenheimer, Mrs. Elmo 
Holder, Mrs. Ivey Orrell, C. E. Spurgeon, Rev. E. F. Mum- 
ford. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Rev. J. A. Cox. 

CENTER HILL— Mrs. R. B. Sheets, Mrs. Chas. Johnson, Mr. Chas. 

Johnson, Mrs. Ray Owen, Mrs. J. F. Jarrett, Mrs. Hugh L. 

Miller, Rev. J. F. Jarrett, Mrs. H. L. Cody. 
CHURCHLAND— Miss Lena Rickard, Mrs. Glenn Barnes, L. E. Rick- 

ard, Glen H. Barnes, Mrs. R. G. Snider, Mrs. Elgie Rickard, 

W. H. Lomax, Mrs. L. E. Rickard. 
DENTON— Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Floyd Coggins, Mrs. Ben Carroll, Mr. 

and Mrs. R. C. Wall, A. L. Snider. 
ERLANGER— Rev. E. C. Roach, Ralph Campbell. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. Paul Palmer, J. W. Dickens, Jr., G. C. Palmer, 

Geo. C. Workman, Miss Grace Palmer. 
JERSEY— Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Sharpe, Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Penninger, 

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Tate, Mr. and Mrs. Reid Smith. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. O. K. Sharpe, Miss Bessie Goss, John B. Lane, 

Miss Ua Hensley, G. W. Miller, Mrs. A. L. Pickard, Mrs. S. E. 

Miller, Mrs. B. F. Lee, Mrs. D. F. Conrad, B. F. Lee, C. M. 

Wall, Sr., Rev. L. S. Gaines, Sam J. Smith, H. C. Myers, 

L. A. Martin. 

LIBERTY— O. F. Hughes, Mrs. N. F. Hooker, L. E. Hepler, E. T. Ken- 
nedy, Mrs. F. F. Lopp, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Mrs. B. J. May, 
Stuart Hepler. 

LICK CREEK— W. A. Jarvis, Miss Pauline Feezor, J. C. Reid, Mrs. 
A. W. Feezor, Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Davis, Paul Feezor. 

MILLS HOiME— Rev. J. A. McMillan, H. G. Early, Miss Sallie Mc- 
cracken, J. A, Neilson, Miss Winnie Stroup, R. D. Covington, 
I. G. Greer. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW— G. L. Carrick, Mrs. Carlie Carrick, J. L. Briggs, 

Mr. and Mrs. Cuther Carrick, Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Carrick. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Glennie Swaim, Miss Lois Willard, Mrs. 

Vivian Hines, Rev. L. J. Matthews, C. F. Motsinger. 
OAK HILL MEMORIALr-HMrs. R. A. Leonard, Mrs. Dolan Kennedy, 

K. C. Lambeth, S. L. Lambeth, Mrs. Carl Trotter. 
PLEASANT PLAINS— Rev. H. T. Hunt, Mrs. Adline Poole, Mary Jane 

Garner. 

REEDS— Mrs. R. A. Hill, Mrs. R. L. Myers, Rev. and Mrs. N. C. 

Teague, Mrs. Thurman Myers, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, R. W. Hege. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Graver. 
REID STREET— Mrs. S. A. Renegar, Miss Ruby Batton. 
RICH FORK— Rev. T. W. Bray, Mrs. M. A. Eddinger, Mrs. Dave 

Clinard, Verna Kanoy. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL^Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Young, Mr. and Mrs. 

Odis Frank, Ervin Cooper, Mrs. J. H. Guffy, Ed Anderson. 
SMITH GROVE— Rev. D. W. Digh, Mrs. D. W. Digh, I. E. Lassiter, 

Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Morefield. 
SOUTHSIDEr-Rev. S. G. Snider, Julia Beck, Lola Snider, Mrs. R. W. 

Crump, Mrs. Ada Scarlett, Mrs. W. C. Harmon. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, L. E. Lookabill. 
SUMMERVILLE— Rev. and Mrs. C. L. Pickler, Mrs. J. L., Nona and 

Nina Daniel, Mrs, E. L. Newsom, Mrs. Essie Davis. 
TAYLORS GROVE— Not represented. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. C. C. Coppedge, L. E. Teague, Miss Vessie 
Gillespie, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Mrs. Milton Jones, Mr. and 
Mrs. O. G. File, Rev. W. K. McGee, Mrs. R. S. Greer, Mrs. 
C. M. Howell, Mrs. J. L. Ward. 

WALLBURG— Mr. and Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, J. W. Tuttle, Mrs. 
J. W. Tuttle. 

WALl^ERS GROVE— Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, N. W. Prevost, Mrs. John 
Yates, Paul Gallimore, Mamie Lee Gallimore, Mrs. Carl 
Gallimore. 

WELCOME^Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, W. S. DLsher, E. S. 
Graver, M. L. Graver, Mrs. G. S. Haynes. 



CONSTITUTION ANI> BY-LAWS 

See Page 14, 1929 Minutes) 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association tO( furnish 
the Gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
Association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Aricle 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the 
Association, pastors, of the churches in the Association, and messen- 
gers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 
thereof over and above 100' members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the Association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in! like organi- 
zations, or as defined by the Association from time to time. 

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the Association, and to attend to all business 
in the Association between the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the Association. The 
Association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this Association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the 
Association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 
(See page 14 of Minutes of 1929.) 



STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

CHURCHES NOT CONTRIBUTING TO BENEVOLENCES 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the 
Liberty Association has as its chief function the propagation of a 
missionary spirit among our people, and inasmuch as a church which 
fails to contribute to beneficiencies outside its local budget fails to 
justify its claim of being a missionary Baptist church, we therefore 
recommend that a church which contributes nothing to missionary 
objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the Association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the Association it 
shows no improvement in its gifts. 

(See page 12, 1928 Minutes.) 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters 
might have their report ready for the first day of the Association In 
the future, Rev. Walter Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that 
our Association year close with the last Sunday in August each year, 
and that immediately after this date the different church clerks 
prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the Association. 

(See page 29, 1931 Minutes.) 

ORDINATION OF NEW MINISTERS 
As Recommended By Executive Promotion Committee And Adopted 
By The Aissociation 
(See page 27 of 1939 Minutes.) 

1 — ^That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for 
examination and approval for ordination to the full work of the 
Gospel Ministry, an Examining Council be summoned by written 
invitation of at least one week in advance from the church nominat- 
ing the candidate, the Council to include the pastor and one member- 
at-large from each Baptist Church in the fellowship of the Associa- 
tion. 

2 — That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly 
in the auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announce- 
ment given in good time so that all the brethren who wish to do so 
may attend the examination. 

3— That we ordain only those who have received definite call 
to become pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its 
Association, which church shall have requested his ordination. 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES 

It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to 
organize themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking 
the recognition of and the fellowship and cooperation with this 
Association, be requested to fulfill the following requirements: 

1 — Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of 
the desire to organize a church before any such organization takes 
place. The moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Com- 
mittee to study and pass upon the need of and the practicability 
for such an organization. 

2 — The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so 
as not to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of 
the churches already affiliated with this Association. This will be 
determined by the Promotion Executive Committee. 

3 — Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee, 
the group will then request a council to examine the church covenant 
and the articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended 
that this council consist of three pastors and three laymen of the 
Association appointed by the Moderator, Should this council approve 
the covenant and articles of faith, the group will then proceed to be 
constituted into a Baptist Church of the same faith and order. 

4 — The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, 
may at the next annual Association present a letter to the Association 
asking for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, 
including with this letter a copy of the articles of Faith and the 
church covenant adopted by the body, as well as a report of the work 
since time of organization as it regards all phases of our Baptist 
Program of Missions, Evangelism, Education, Social Service, Training 
and Worship. 

5 — The previously appointed council of three pastors and three 
laymen will examine the letter and reports of the newly organized 
church, and will recommend to the Association its acceptance or 
rejection as the case may be. 

(See Minutes of 1941, Page 20.) 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO PROGRAM 
COMMITTEE 

The following resolution was offered and adopted: 

That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the 
Association, pastors of the entertaining churches and three persons, 
named by the moderator during the session of the Association. 

See page 31, 1941 minutes. 



RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO MESSENGERS 

Rev. W. K. McGee offered a resolution as follows, 
which was adopted. 

That the names of messengers printed in the min- 
utes include only those actually attending the Associa- 
tion from the delegations elected by the churches. 

(See Page 31 of 1941 Minutes.) 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ONE HUNDRED TENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

LIBERTY BAPTIST CHURCH 
R. F. D. No. 2. Thomasville, N. C. 

And The 

ABBOTTS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
R. F. D. No. 2. High Point. N. C. 

September 8th and 9th, 1942. 



TUESDAY 

Morning Session Sept 8th, 1942 

1. On Tuesday, Sept. 8, 1942, at 9:45 A. M., the 
Liberty Baptist Association assembled in its One Hun- 
dred and Tenth Annual Session with the Liberty Bap- 
tist church, Thomasville, N. C, R. F. D. No. 2. 

3. At 10:00 A. M., Rev. H. M. Stroup, the Modera- 
tor, called the Body to order for the transaction of 
business. 

4. The Opening Devotional and song service was 
led by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of the Erlanger church. 

APPOINTMENT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
FOR NEXT YEAR 

5. The Moderator appointed at this time the fol- 
lowing to serve as the Program Committee for next 
year: Rev. E. F. Mumford, A. L. Snider and Jesse W. 
Dickens, Jr., these in addition to the ones stipulated 
in resolution passed at 1941 session (See page 31, 1941 
Minutes.) 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

6. Sam J. Smith read the report of the Program 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



Committee for this session. The report and the follow- 
ing order of business was adopted for the session. 

TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotional Rev. D. W. Digh 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Mr. Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Christian Literature Rev. J. A. McMillan 

10:40 Baptist Hospital Mr. A. L. Snider 

11:15 Roll call of churches; new pastors; appointment of committees 

11:40 Sermon Mr. I. G, Greer 

12:30 Lunch 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:00 Devotional Rev. J. A. Cox 

2:15 Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions Rev. L. S. Gaines 

2. Home Missions Miss Sallie McCracken 

3. Foreign Missions Rev. B. A. Mitchell 

2:35 Address Mr. M. A. Huggins 

3:25 State of Churches Rev. J. A. Neilson 

1. Digest of Letters (blackboard). 

2. Goals for ensuing year 
4:00 Adjourn 

TUESDAY EVENING 

8:00 Devotional Rev. S. G. Snider 

8:15 Report of Sunday School Mr. C. F. Motsinger 

Associational S. S. Superintendent in charge 

(This meeting will take the place of the October Quarterly 

S. S. Associational Meeting.) 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

(At Abbotts Creek Church, High Point, N. C, Route Z) 

9:45 Devotional Rev. Otis Lanning 

10:00 Election of Officers — Business, etc. 

10:20 Christian Education Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr. 

11:00 Orphanage Rev. N. C. Teague 

11:35 American Bible Society Rev. L. S. Gaines 

12:00 Doctrinal or Missionary Sermon Dr. Ralph A. Herring 

12:40 Lunch 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:00 Devotional Rev. C. S. Young 

2:15 Women's Missionary Union Mrs. A. F. Warfford 

2:45 Public Morals and Law Enforcement Rev. J. A. Neilson 

3:15 Ministerial Relief Dr. W. K. McGee 

3:40 Reports of Committees 

4:00 Adjourn 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 

00 Devotional Miss Ha Hensley 

15 Report on Training Union Miss Elizabeth Smith 

25 Associational B. T. U. Director in Charge .... Mr. Wilbur Lewis 
Program to be supplied 
Adjourn 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO 
R. D. COVINGTON, RETIRING MODERATOR 

7. Rev. E. C. Roach offered the following resolu- 
tion, which was adopted. 

Whereas, we are mindful of the faithful and effective service 
rendered by Brother R. D. Covington to our Denomination over a 
long span of years as Treasurer of Mills and Kennedy Homes, and 

Whereas, we are also aware of our debt of deep appreciation to 
Brother Covington for his service as Moderator of Liberty Baptist 
Association for a period of six years. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 

(1) That we express to Brother Covington our sincere feeling of 
highest human esteem and deepest Christian love because of the 
influence of his Christian life and because of his faithful and effec- 
tive work in behalf of our North Carolina Baptist Orphanage and 
Liberty Baptist Association, and 

(2) That we hereby express the hope that Brother Covington 
may be spared, in robust health, to serve for many years to come in 
the fellowship and work of North Carolina and Liberty Baptists, and 

(3) That a copy of this resolution be printed in the 1942 Min- 
utes of Liberty Baptist Association, and another copy be printed in 
the columns of The Biblical Recorder, and a copy be printed in the 
coluiTins of the Charity and Children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. ROACH, 
L. S. GA-^NES. 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

8. The report of Christian Literature was made by 
Rev. J. A. McMillan, Editor of Charity and Children. 
Upon motion to adopt the report was discussed by Miss 
Sallie McCracken, Mrs. C. C. Coppidge, Rev. E. C. 
Roach and Dr. W. K, McGee. 

The report was adopted. 

ESSENTIAL BAPTIST PERIODICALS 

This report will consist of an irreducible list of periodicals that 
should be found in every intelligent missionary Baptist home, their 
price and where published. 

First there is what we speak of as Sunday school literature that 
is ordered in bulk from the Smiday School Board, Nashville, Term. 
See that every pupil has a quarterly, that every teacher has The 
Teacher and that the superintendent has the Sunday School Builder. 
All of this should be paid for out of the Sunday school treasury. Also 
the Sunday school should place a copy of Charity and Children in 
every* home and pay for them out of the Sunday school treasury. 
They can be had from the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, 
Thomasville, and the price is sixty cents per year per copy for 10 
copies or morei and $1.00 per year for single copies. The B. T. U. 



12 



MINUTES OP THE 



literature should also be paid for by the church and should be 
sufficient for the young people's work. The Sunday school and 
B. T. U. literature, secured from the Sunday School Board, Nashville, 
Tenn., and Charity and Children, Thomasville, should be ordered in 
bulk and paid for by the Sunday school and church. 

Then there are the periodicals that are equally essential and 
should be paid for by the individual Baptist. First the Biblical 
Recorder, Raleigh, price $1.50. That is if three people out of a 
church with a membership . of 100 subscribe they get the paper for 
$1.50. Surely, there is not a Baptist church in the state where at 
least three people out of 100 will not take the North Carolina Baptist 
paper. Every home should by all means have it. If it is not in 
your home' there is something the matter. There is The Commis- 
sion, the publication of the Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va. 
It is a monthly magazine and costs only 50 cents per year. It is 
filled with thrilling stories of our heroes on the foreign field. Home 
Missions is published by our Home Mission Board in Atlanta, Ga, 
It is one of the most intensely interesting publications that it is 
possible for you to have. It is also a monthly magazine and costs 
only 25 cents per year. Now for our W. M. U. magazines. Royal 
Service, 50 cents per year for our women; Window of Y. W. A., $1.00 
for our young women; World Comrades, $1.00, for our young people. 
These three. Royal Service, The Window of Y. W. A. and World 
Comrades are published by the W. M. U., 1111 Comer Street, Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Now let us see what this irreducible list will cost in a family 
where there are young women and children. Where there are no 
young women and children leave off The Window and World Com- 
rades. 



The Biblical Recorder $1.50 

Royal Service 50 

Window of Y. W. A 1.00 

World Comrades 1.00 

The Commission 50 

Home Missions 25 

Total $4.75 



BAPTIST HOSPITALS 

9. The report on Hospitals was made by Mr. Albert 
L. Snider, a layman of the Denton church, which was 
adopted. 

About the year 1922 the Baptists of North Carolina became defi- 
nitely conscious of the fact that we needed a hospital that could 
provide treatment for the multitudes of sick people in our state who 
were too poor to pay a hospital bill. Feeling keenly this Christian 
responsibility to suffering humanity, the doors of the Baptist Hos- 
pital were opened for the first patient on May 28, 1923. 

The demands upon this Christian hospital were so great that 
they were caring for some 4,000 patients a year up to three years ago 
with only 100 beds, which gives us an idea of the over-crowded con- 
dition up to that time. About one -third of the above nimiber were 
charity patients. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



Today we have one of the most modern and best equipped hos- 
pitals in the South, caring for near 650 patients per month or ap- 
proximately 10,000 per year, with a few rooms not open because of 
the existing war conditions. This year our hospital shall render no 
less than $250,000 in free service to patients imable to pay. 

The hospital staff consists of 26 interns and about 100 doctors 
practicing regularly, besides more than a hundred nurses, and 50 
additional girls in training. In addition it has the free service of 
the entire medical school staff whenever desired for consultation and 
diagnosis, which gives the most efficient service possible. 

The equipment, as well as the building, is most modern in design 
and type, having recently added $64,000 worth of instruments and 
X-ray equipment, making the X-ray department one of the best 
in the South. 

The hospital, in conjunction with the Medical School, has a 
floor-space of four acres and represents a value to the denomination 
of $2,000,000 with only a very small amount of indebtedness. 

The purpose of the hospital shall remain as ever to give hospital 
treatment to those who are unable to pay for same except mental 
and tubercular cases, educate nurses v^^ith Christian ideals, and at 
the same time maintain a standard of scientific efficiency "second 
to none in the country." It is the abiding purpose of the manage- 
ment that it shall be definitely a Christian Institution with all that 
it implies. 

This greatly expanded service which is growing more and more 
into every section of the state, of course, requires an increased sup- 
port. This, we are glad to report, is growing year by year. In 
addition to the Mother's Day offering by the churches and Sunday 
schools, which has increased in the last few years from $11,500 to 
about $38,000 this year. The hospital linens are contributed by the 
W. M. U.'s and other church agencies which have increased year 
by year. 

Respectfully, 

A. L. SNIDER. 

ADDRESS BY SMITH HAGAMAN 

10. Smith Hagaman, Superintendent of the Baptist 
Hospital at Winston-Salem, spoke to the Body at this 
time. He stressed the need among our church mem- 
bers of a better Christianity, a positive Christianity, 
one that will take on something vital and that will 
change things. 

He also spoke of the Christian spirit that prevails 
at the hospital and the desire of and for a Christian 
body in The Medical School. 

ROLL CALL OF THE CHURCHES 

lOA. The roll call of the churches was made at this 
time by the clerk. All churches except Taylor's Grove 
were represented. 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES BY THE 
MODERATOR 

11. H. M. Stroup, the Moderator, at this time, ap- 
pointed the following committees: 

ON FINANCE— Bro. Tom W. Bray, Chairman; Johnnie Carrick, 
G. C. Palmer, K. C. Lambeth, L. E. Hepler. 

TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— Bro. C. M. Wall, Sr., Chair- 
man; J. C. Reid, C. E. Spurgeon, G. W. Miller, Rev. C. S. 
Young. 

TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING THE REPORTS FOR NEXT 

YEAR— Bro. B. A. Mitchell, Chairman; I. G. Greer, J. W. 

Dickens, Jr., B. F. Lee, Rev. E. F. Mumford. 
TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR— Bro. W. K. 

McGee, Chairman; D. S. Hay worth, A. L. Snider, Miss Sallie 

McCracken, Rev. L. J. Matthews. 
ON OBITUARIES— Bro. S. G. Snider, Chairman; Mrs. C. M. 

Howell, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Miss Vessie Gillespie, Rev. J. F. 

Jarre tt. 

ON RESOLUTIONS— Bro. E. C. Roach, Chairman; R. C. Wall, 

R. A. Tate, Maskey M. Smith, L. E. Teague. 
COUNCIL ON ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES— Brethren 

L. S. Gaines, Chairman; C. F. Motsinger, W. K. McGee, M. L. 

Craver, J. A. McMillan, B. J. May. 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO DAY OF PRAYER 

12. Dr. W. K. McGee, pastor of First Church, 
Thomasville, offered a resolution to the effect that 
The Liberty Association ask the coming session of The 
Baptist State Convention to petition our President that 
a day be set aside as a day of prayer, rest and fasting. 

He also asked that the Moderator appoint a com- 
mittee to study his resolution and make recommenda- 
tion to The Association concerning it. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee 
to consider it and report to the Body. B. A. Mitchell, 
chairman, Floyd Coggings, Rev. N. C. Teague, Miss 
Winnie Stroup and Mrs. Vivian Palmer. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS IN RE ENTERTAINMENT 

13. Mr. Stewart Hepler, of the Liberty church, at 
this time announced to the Body the arrangements to 
be followed in serving dinner to the delegations. 

ANNUAL SERMON 
13. The Annual Sermon was delivered by Mr. 1. G. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Greer, General Superintendent of the Mills Home. 

His text was from Psalms 1-3. 
His subject being "Like a Tree." 

NEW PASTORS RECOGNIZED 

13A. The following new pastors in the Association 
were recognized: 

Rev. W. D. Williamson, pastor of the Lick Creek 
Church. 

Rev. C. B. Reid, pastor of the Taylor's Grove 
Church. 

RECOGNITION OF VISITORS 

14. During the morning session of the Association 
the following visitors registered and were given due 
recognition : 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent Baptist Hospital, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

M. A. Huggins, Secretary, Baptist State Conven- 
tion, Raleigh, N. C. 

Rev. M. L. Ross, Concord, N. C. 
Rev. R. E. Heath, Asheboro, N. C. 
Mr. Everett Whisnant, Asheboro, N. C. 
Rev. C. M. Floyd, Thomasville, N. C. 
Mr. A. B. Conrad, High Point, N. C. 
Mr. S. A. Sutton, Portsmouth, Va. 
Mr. C. B. Davis, Charlotte, N. C. 
Mr. J. V. Henderson, Greensboro, N. C. 
Mrs. Raymond Boaz, Farmville, N. C. 

15. Closing prayer was offered by Rev. N. C. Tea- 
gue, pastor of the Reeds and Churchland churches. 

ADJOURNMENT 

16. The Body adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to recon- 
vene at 2:00 P. M. 



TUESDAY 
AFTERNOON SESSION 
17. The afternoon devotional was led by Rev. J. A. 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



Cox, pastor of the Southside and Oak Hill Memorial 
churches. 

The song service being led by Mr. Carey Davis. 

MOTION IN RE PUBLICATION OF SERMON 

18. Rev. E. C. Roach made motion that Mr. I. G. 
Greer furnish to the Biblical recorder and to Charity 
and Children a copy of his sermon delivered at the 
morning session to be published in said papers. 

The motion was adopted. 

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

19. The Report on State Missions prepared by Rev. 
L. S. Gaines v^as read by Miss Ila Hensley. 

The Report on Home Missions was made by Miss 
Sally McCracken. 

The Report on Foreign Missions was made by Rev. 
B. A. Mitchell, pastor of the Abbotts Creek church. 

The reports were all adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS 

Secretary Kuggins in his book, "Kingdom Building in North Car- 
olina," says: "It may be said . , . with assurance that State Missions 
has been the prime agency during the years in uniting the people 
of the churches in a common task." Since the organization of our 
Baptist State Convention in 1830 the work of State Missions has ex- 
panded until we now have three general missionaries, Rev. Mr. M. O. 
Alexander, Rev. Mr. J. C. Pipes, and Rev. Mr. Douglas M. Branch, 
who work among the churches in the interest of promotion and ev- 
angelism. Mr Alexander works in Eastern Carolina, Mr. Branch works 
in the Piedmont, and Mr. Pipes works in the Western Mountain 
Section of the state. 

Our Mission Board invests something like $2,000 in salaries of 
a few Associational Missionaries, and something like $25,000 in the 
salaries of Missionary Pastors, about 80 of whom serve nearly 200 
churches. Om- State Mission Board expended last year some $15,000 
on church building aid, assisting in the purchase of lots and in the 
erection of buildings at strategic points. Nearly $4,000 was expended 
in the promotion of the general work of Christian Education in the 
churches. In particular, we note that $12,000 was spent upon the pro- 
motion of Sunday School work in North Carolina; $10,500 was spent 
on the promotion of Training Union work; $7,600 was spent on the 
promotion of Baptist Student Union work on college campuses. Our 
benevolent ministries include $1,800 expended on Negro work, $1,524 
on Indian work, $1,065 on ministries to the sick at Western North 
Carolina Sanatorium at Black Mountain and State Sanatorium near 
Aberdeen. Some $1,500 were expended in the promotion of Pastor 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



School and Conferences, and it is estimated that around $18,000 
will have been expended on work around the military camps. 

North Carolina has been and is a dead-ripe harvest field des- 
perately in need of harvesters. Practically all of the leading churches 
in our cities, towns and country places have at some time been aid- 
ed by the State Mission Board. It is reported in Brother Huggin's 
book, "Kingdom Building in North Carolina" that when the Board 
was concentrating in promotional missionary work in the East and 
in the Piedmont years ago, the First Baptist Church in Raleigh, for 
instance, was aided to the extent of $18,750, and since that time (1856) 
that "great old church has paid into the treasury of the State Con- 
vention more than $500,000." The Convention of 1856 "was urged to 
cultivate the town of Grensboro as a 'post of first importance' . . . . 
and it is probable that this church (First Baptist, Greensboro) has 
paid into the Convention treasury during the years another $500,000." 

"Baptists are now the most powerful and probably the most in- 
fluential Christian group in North Carolina." In 1940 they numbered 
in North Carolina 515,687. We can say, in fact, that the growth of 
Baptist church membership in North Carolina from seven or eight 
thousand in 1830 to over half a million in 1942 is due in a large 
measure to the effective work of the N. C. Baptist State Board of 
Missions. "About 48 of every 100 persons in North Carolina who are 
members of any Christian body are members of Baptist Churches." 
"State Missions has been a rallying point" from whence our spiritual 
activities have radiated to all portions of the state where we have 
been aware of spiritual need. 

Our Secretary reports that in the calendar year, 1942, Baptists 
in North Carolina "will give to Missions, Christian Education and 
Benevolence about one MILLION DOLLARS." Let us thank God for 
this v/onderful growth and development of our Baptist work and 
take courage for the future in the confidence that we can and will 
go on toward the liquidation of all Southern Baptist and State Con- 
vention debts before the close of the year 1944 meanwhile increasing 
our support of those causes in North Carolina that need our support 
at this moment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES 

Lexington 

HOME MISSIONS 

Time was when the outlook for the work of the Home Mission 
Board was rather discouraging. But as suggested in their report to the 
Southern Baptist Convention in May they have recovered from their 
dismay, despondency, and despair which overwhelmed them a de- 
cade ago. Wise leaders were chosen and they proved their merit by 
the wonderful piece of financing through these years. The reduction 
of the debt has been marvelous. The work of carrying the gospel to 
the representatives of many nations, who have sought citizenship 
in our Southern Baptist territory, as well as to the underprivileged 
of our own people, has not been neglected, but rather it has been 
enlarged and increased. They took as their motto: "Trust the Lord 
and tell the people." They also chose a scripture as an anchorage to 
their faith: "But my God shall supply all your needs according to 
his riches in glory by Christ Jesus."— Phillipians 4:19. Their Mission 
slogan was: "The making and baptising or disciples." So they report 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



tbat God gave them the pillar of cloud by day and fire by night to 
lead them across the Red Sea of discouragement and through the 
wilderness of financial disaster and across the Jordan of debt adjust- 
rrent into the Promised Land of credit integrity and financial sec- 
urity. So faithfully have they lived and worked by these slogans and 
mottoes that a letter addressed to Phillipians 4:19, Home Mission 
Board, Atlanta, Ga., will immediately be delivered into the hands of 
our veteran Field Secretary, Dr. J. W. Beagle. 

Last February the debts of $550,000.00 were refinanced at 2 1/2% 
interest. Since that time $275,000.00 have been paid, leaving the debt 
at the first of this month, September, $275,000.00. A, continued in- 
crease in the contributions was reported at the meeting of the Board 
last week, the amount for August, 1942 exceeding that of August, 1941 
by $10,877.70. 

One of the most important tasks before the Home Board now is 
the work in the camps under the direction of Dr. Alfred Carpenter. 
Dr. Carpenter says their slogan is: "Carry Christ to the Camps," and 
that at the end of August they had 428 Baptist ministers serving as 
chaplains in the camps. These ministers reported 1147 professions 
the past month. 

On the resignation of Dr. Ellis Fuller as President of the Home 
Mission Board, who goes to the Louisville Seminary as its President, 
Mr. B. L. Bugg, a widely known financier and philanthropist of At- 
lanta wa^ chosen as President of the Board. 

When the last dollar of this debt is paid in the next few months 
and the history of these trials and accomplishments are written it 
will no doubt be one of the most interesting and amazing stories in 
the annals of our Baptist denomination. 

The Home Mission Board should have the support of our pock- 
etbooks; it needs our prayers; it deserves our praise. 

SALLiE L. Mccracken 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

A pall of darkness in the form of international strife has settled 
over us. In spite of this, we must carry on in faith until the dawn 
of a brighter day. 

The story of Foreign Missions for the year is not entirely one 
of retrenchments, for progress is in evidence on several fields. 464 
missionaries of our Foreign Mission Board are on the fields of Africa, 
Asia, Europe, South America, and the Hawaiian Islands, and are 
engaged in a ministry of education, evangelism, and healing. Work 
has been inaugurated in two new fields, namely, Colombia and the 
Hawaiian Islands. Dr. Everett Gill, Jr., was recently elected secre- 
tary of our Latin American work, and sends glowing reports of the 
Colombia field. Five new missionaries have been appointed to this 
recent field. 

Our indebtedness, $1,110,000 when Dr. Maddry came to the Board, 
was reduced this year by an installment of $77,000, leaving a sum of 
$128,000 still unpaid. It now appears that 1943 will be victory year in 
the overcoming of debts. To date, $300,000 has been received to meet 
the needs arising out of the present emergency. 

The women of the South have become an indispensable aid 
to the missionary cause, their Lottie Moon Christmas offering having 
risen to $449,162.48 this year. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



The Commission, our informing missionary magazine, ha^ en- 
joyed a good growth, increasing in circulation from 23,190 to 39,313 
copies. It ought to be a visitor in every Southern Baptist home. 

Southern Baptists now have the greatest number of missionaries 
they have ever had in Africa — a total of sixty. The work has been 
impeded in no way by world conditions. Our chief problem is that 
of dangerous transportation. 

Since total war enveloped Europe and the Near East, it has been 
necessary for all our American missionaries to withdrav/. Mrs. N. J. 
Bengtson of Barcelona is our only missionary in all Europe. Her 
report of the work is grand, with 21 additions and many personal 
decisions made. 

The spirit of our missionaries in the Orient would be hard to 
match. Though a prisoner in Tokyo, a message concerning Dr. 
Maxfield Garrott, and coming through Mr. Cordell Hull, said, "Max- 
field Garrott is still busy, is happy and sends love." Dr. M. T, 
Rankin sends a word from Stanley prison in Hong Kong urging 
Southern Baptists to press their opportunities in Free China. Dr. 
J. R. Saunders and Dr. B. J. Cauthen recently wrote: "We earnestly 
urge that prayer without ceasing be made for these prisoners of the 
Lord Jesus Christ, that their lives be spared, their essential needs 
met, and that these sufferings and hardships may prepare our people 
here and in the homeland for the great onward movement of the 
Gospel of Christ." 

Since the writing of this report, we have learned that Dr. Rankin 
was scheduled to have arrived at Jersey City, New Jersey, August 25. 

Surely Southern Baptists will match the spirit^ of sacrifice our 
missionaries are manifesting, by "giving of their sons and daughters 
to bear the message glorious, and of their wealth, to speed them on 
their way." 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. A. MITCHELL. 

IN REGARD TO RECEPTION OF NEW 
CHURCHES INTO BODY 

20. Rev. Howard Hunt was called on by the Mod- 
erator for some remarks concerning the efforts being 
made to organize a church at Silver Valley. 

Mr. Hunt stated that land had been donated and 
that much of the material to construct a building was 
on the grounds, and asked for the assistance of the 
Association in the work there. 

The Moderator asked the clerk to read a resolu- 
tion that was adopted by the Association last year in 
regard to the entrance and reception of new churches. 

ADDRESS BY M. A. HUGGINS, SECRETARY OF 
BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

21. Mr. Huggins delivered an address that was 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



greatly appreciated by all. He stressed the fact that 
North Carolina is not a Christian state. He further 
stated that he was proud of the fact that the Baptists 
this year were going to raise over a million dollars for 
benevolences; but that he was compelled to admit 
that his pride was dimmed to a great extent when on 
the other hand he was faced with the fact that North 
Carolina was drinking every month one and one-half 
million dollars worth of legal liquor each month, be- 
sides all the block liquor consumed. 

STATE OF CHURCHES AND DIGEST OF 
CHURCH LETTERS 

22. The report on State of the Churches and Digest 
of Church Letters was made by Rev. J. A. Neilson, and 
was adopted by the Body. 

1. CKURCH MEMBERSHIP. The churches of our Association 
report this year, 7278 members over against 7084 reported last year, 
a gain of 194 members There were 259 baptisms during the year, 
with two churches reporting no baptisms at all. We baptized 97 less 
this year than we did last year. Twenty of our churches show an 
increase, eight show a decrease, while one shows the same in mem- 
bership this year. Total additions reported this year amoimt to 
453, a loss of 95 from last year. 

2. SUNDAY SCHOOL. Our S. S. enrollment this year is 6933, 
an increase of 22. The average attendance, however, dropped from 
4095 to 3808, a decrease of 287. Fifteen churches held a D. V. B. S. 
during the summer, with an enrollment of 911, and an average at- 
tendance of 792. 

3. TRAINING UNION. We find our churches reporting 98 Train- 
ing Unions, an increase of 3 over last year, but there is a decrease in 
attendance from 1098 last year to 1021 this year. Ten churches 
report no training union at all. 73 of our young people are reported 
as being students in college this year. 

4. W. M. U. The W. M. U.'s of our Association report 109 organ- 
izations with 2058 enrolled, an increase of 7 organizations and 189 
members. The number of churches without any W. M. U. is steadily 
decreasing until we now have only 6 reporting no missionary organi- 
zation whatsoever. 

5. GIFTS, (a) To Local Church Expenses. These amounted to 
$69,525.00, a gain of $12,928 over last year's gifts. 

(b) To Benevolences— we gave $28,039.00, a gain of $7,342.00 

(c) To the Orphanage— we gave $5,797, a gain of $361.00 

(d) To All Causes — Our gifts amounted to $97,564.00, an increase over 
last year of $20,270.00, by far the largest amount ever contributed by 
the churches of the Liberty Baptist Association. Gifts per capita 
jumped from $10.94 to $13.40, ranging from the lowest, $214 to the 
highest $30.89. 

Our attention has been called to the work done by two of the 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



leading churches in our Association. Last Sunday, September 6, 1942, 
Rev. Louis Gaines began his tenth year as pastor of the First Baptist 
Church of Lexington. During the nine years of his pastorate, 539 
members have been added to the church, 268 by baptism, 243 by 
letter, and 28 by statement. Gifts have increased from $12,379.85 in 
1934, to $26,889.75 in 1942, a grand total of $153,457.18 during the 
nine years. 

On July 26th of this year, the First Baptist Church of Thomasville, 
of which Dr. W. K. McGee is pastor, had a special service in celebra- 
tion of the fact that their debt of $13,000.00 had been paid in full, 
and that the church was now free from debt. During the seven 
years that Dr. McGee has been pastor, the church has raised $73,- 
000.00 for all purposes. There have been 425 additions to the church, 
and the church has sponsored the organization of a mission S. S. 
which has since been organized into a full time Baptist Church 
known as Reid Street Baptist Church, with Rev. Otis Lanning as 
pastor. 

We commend both these churches and their pastors on their 
faithful work. 

GOALS FOR THE YEAR. 

Your committee recommends that the following goals be set 
before us as an association for the coming year: 

1. A W. M. S. in every church. 

2. An increase in gifts to the Orphanage. 

3. The raising of $100,000.00 for all causes by all the churches 
of the Association. 

4. A B. T. U. in every church. 

5. The doubling of our gifts to the Himdred Thousand Club. 

6. The building and repairing of the Family Altar in our homes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON. 

RESOLUTION FROM PROMOTION EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

23. Rev. J. A. Neilson, chairman of the Executive 
Promotion Committee, offered a resolution providing 
for the appointment of an Executive Committee to be 
composed of 5 or 7 members. 

Rev. W. K. McGee offered an amendment to the 
resolution and made motion that a committee be ap- 
pointed to study the amendment and report tomorrow. 
The motion was adopted and the committee appointed 
by the Moderator. 

ADJOURNMENT 

24. After being led in prayer by Rev. W. D. Wil- 
liamson, pastor of the Lick Creek church, the Body 
adjourned to reconvene at 8:00 P. M. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



TUESDAY EVENING SESSION 

25. The association reconvened at 8:00 P. M. The 
evening devotional was conducted by Rev. S. G. Sni- 
der, pastor of the Southside church. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

26. Mr. C. F. Motsinger, associational Sunday 
School Superintendent, brought the report on Sunday 
Schools. 

After motion to adopt the report some remarks 
were made by Mr. Motsinger concerning the Sunday 
School work in the association. 

Mr. H. H. Jones, a layman from High Point, N. C, 
and a well known State Sunday School worker, deliv- 
ered an address that was inspiring to all. 

The report was adopted. 

The program through which the church carries out Christ's 
Commission is preaching, teaching, and healing. The teaching is 
done through the Sunday Schools. Throughout this great country 
of ours each Sunday, millions of boys and girls, men and women 
gather in the Lord's house and enter into this teaching program. 
Thousands of consecrated men and women are giving of their time 
and talent in order that these millions may be taught God's Holy 
Word. 

Here in the Liberty Association we have 31 Sunday Schools with 
an enrollment reported last year of 6911 and an average attendance 
of 4095. This year the enrollment is 6911 and the average attend- 
ance 4013. A gain of 22 enrollments. There are 29 churches with a 
membership of 7084. Since many of our Sunday school pupils do 
not belong to church, there are a large number of church members 
who are not enrolled in Sunday School. Every church should put on 
a campaign to enroll and enlist its membership in this teaching 
program. 

Recently there was held in this Association a Sunday school 
Revival and Enlargement Campaign, with 15 churches participating. 
These 15 churches have an enrollment in Sunday School of 4061 
and an average attendance of 2110, and 7074 possibilities. Basing 
an estimation on this we have at least 13000 possibilities for Sunday 
Schools in the Liberty Association. For every one in Sunday School 
on Sunday there are three on the outside. We also found, in the 
territory of these 15 churches, 2323 unsaved above the primary de- 
partment. This gives around 5O0O unsaved people for whom the 
Baptists of the Liberty Association are directly responsible. "For 
the Son of Man is com© to seek and to save that which was lost. ' 
(Luke 19:10). Are we going to let the challenge go unheeded? 

In order that we may more effectively teach those now enrolled 
and reach out after the possibilities we need more and better trained 
workers. No matter how well trained we may be when we consider 
ourselves responsible for teaching God's Word we must admit that 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



we need to be better prepared. There is now being trained a vast 
army for the battle fields, so why not train for an army for work 
in God's kingdom? 

Another great opportunity for teaching the Bible is through the 
Vacation Bible School. Our boys and girls will get as much Bible 
teaching in a ten- day Bible school as they do in six months of 
Sunday School. Last year there were 17 Bible schools with an 
enrollment of 1523 in our Association. This year we had 11 schools 
with an enrollment of 971. We need more vacation Bible schools. 

May we summarize next year's work as follows: 

1. Enroll and enlist all church members. 

2. Put on an evangelistic campaign for those that are lost. 

3. Have as many a^ two training classes in each church. 

4. Properly grade the Sunday Schools and keep them graded 
by having an annual promotion day. 

5. Have a weekly or monthly officers and teachers meeting. 

6. Organize a Cradle Roll and Extension Dept. in every Church. 

7. Have at least 25 Vacation Bible Schools. 

8. Increase the present enrollment by at least 300. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. MOTSINGER. 

27. After prayer, the Association adjourned at 
9:30 P. M. to reconvene tomorrow at 9:45 A. M. at 
Abbotts Creek church. 



THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY 

Morning Session Sept. 9, 1942, 10:00 A. M. 
At Abbotts Creek Church, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2 

28. The devotional at this time was led by Rev. E. 
C. Roach, pastor of the Erlanger church, with the song 
services being led by Mr. Cary Davis of the Wallburg 
church. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

29. Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that Mr. D. 
S. Hayworth be instructed to cast the vote of The As- 
sociation for Rev. H. M. Stroup for Moderator next 
year. 

The motion was adopted and Mr. Hayworth cast 
the vote for Mr. Stroup as instructed. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO RECOMMEND 
OFFICERS FOR 1943 

The committee heretofore appointed to recom- 
mend officers for next year, made their report as fol- 
lows, which was adopted. 

We recommend: 

For Moderator — H. M. Stroup. 

For Vice Moderator — Carroll C. Wall. 

For Clerk and Treasurer — Sam J. Smith. 

Orphanage Representative — C. M. Wall. 

Chairman of The Executive Committee — J. A. Neilson. 

Associational Biblical Recorder Representative — B. A. Mitchell. 

Associational Sunday School Superintendent— C. P. Motsinger. 

Director of Associational B. T. U. — Wilbur Lewis. 

D. S. HAYWORTH 
SALLIE MCCRACKEN 
A. L. SNIDER 
L. J. MATTHEWS 
W. K. McGEE, 

Committee on Nominations. 

MOTION FOR ADMISSION OF MISSION 
SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

30. Rev. J. A. Cox stated to the Body that the Oak 
Hill Memorial church was sponsoring a mission Sun- 
day School in the Johnsontown section of Thomasville 
and made motion that it be received into the Associa- 
tion as such. Like motion was made by Sam J. Smith 
as to the Sunday School at Floyd. The Moderator re- 
ferred the matter to The Council on the Admission of 
New Churches. 

SPECIAL PRAYER 

31. Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that special 
prayer be offered for Rev. L. S. Gaines and the mem- 
bers of his family, who were called to Ohio yesterday 
due to the death of his aunt in that State. 

The motion prevailed and the Moderator called on 
Dr. W. K. McGee, of Thomasville, to offer the prayer. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

32. The Report on Christian Education was brought 
by C. M. Wall, Sr. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



we need to be better prepared. There is now being trained a vast 
army for the battle fields, so why not train for an army for work 
in God's kingdom? 

Another great opportunity for teaching the Bible is through the 
Vacation Bible School. Our boys and girls will get as much Bible 
teaching in a ten- day Bible school as they do in six months of 
Sunday School. Last year there were 17 Bible schools with an 
enrollment of 1523 in our Association. This year we had 11 schools 
with an enrollment of 971. We need more vacation Bible schools. 

May we summarize next year's work as follows: 

1. Enroll and enlist all church members. 

2. Put on an evangelistic campaign for those that are lost. 

3. Have as many as two training classes in each church. 

4. Properly grade the Sunday Schools and keep them graded 
by having an annual promotion day. 

5. Have a weekly or monthly officers and teachers meeting. 

6. Organize a Cradle Roll and Extension Dept. in every Church. 

7. Have at least 25 Vacation Bible Schools. 

8. Increase the present enrollment by at least 300. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. MOTSINGER. 

27. After prayer, the Association adjourned at 
9 :30 P. M. to reconvene tomorrow at 9 :45 A. M. at 
Abbotts Creek church. 



THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY 

Morning Session Sept. 9, 1942, 10:00 A. M. 
At Abbotts Creek Church, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2 

28. The devotional at this time was led by Rev. E. 
C. Roach, pastor of the Erlanger church, with the song 
services being led by Mr. Cary Davis of the Wallburg 
church. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

29. Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that Mr. D. 
S. Hayworth be instructed to cast the vote of The As- 
sociation for Rev. H. M. Stroup for Moderator next 
year. 

The motion was adopted and Mr. Hayworth cast 
the vote for Mr. Stroup as instructed. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO RECOMMEND 
OFFICERS FOR 1943 

The committee heretofore appointed to recom- 
mend officers for next year, made their x-eport as fol- 
lows, which was adopted. 

We recommend: 

For Moderator — H. M. Stroup. 

For Vice Moderator — Carroll C. Wall. 

For Clerk and Treasui^er— Sam J. Smith. 

Orphanage Representative— C. M. Wall. 

Chairman of The Executive Committee — J. A. Neilson. 

Associational Biblical Recorder Representative — B. A. Mitchell. 

Associational Sunday School Superintendent — C. F. Motsinger. 

Director of Associational B. T. U. — Wilbur Lewis. 

D. S. HAYWORTH 

SALLiE Mccracken 

A. L. SNIDER 

L. J. MATTHEWS 

W. K. McGEE, 

Committee on Nominations. 

MOTION FOR ADMISSION OF MISSION 
SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

30. Rev. J. A. Cox stated to the Body that the Oak 
Hill Memorial church was sponsoring a mission Sun- 
day School in the Johnsontown section of Thomasville 
and m^ade motion that it be received into the Associa- 
tion as such. Like motion was made by Sam J. Smith 
as to the Sunday School at Floyd. The Moderator re- 
ferred the matter to The Council on the Admission of 
New Churches. 

SPECIAL PRAYER 

31. Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that special 
prayer be offered for Rev. L. S. Gaines and the mem- 
bers of his family, who were called to Ohio yesterday 
due to the death of his aunt in that State. 

The motion prevailed and the Moderator called on 
Dr. W. K. McGee, of Thomasville, to offer the prayer. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

32. The Report on Christian Education was brought 
by C. M. Wall, Sr. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



ground for isolating men fronii women in the college age. 

I believe with all my soul in our Christian educational program 
and bespeak for it the heartiest support of all our people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. M. WALL. 

MILLS HOME— ORPHANAGE 

33. The report on The Mills Home was brought by 
Rev. N. C. Teague, pastor of the Reeds and Jersey 
churches. 

Motion was made to adopt the report, whereupon 
it was discussed by Miss Sarah Elmore, who is con- 
nected with the orphanage. The discussion was made 
very interesting by her showing to the Body pictures 
that illustrated the different activities and work at 
the Home. 

The report was adopted. 

When there are so many calls for money, effort, and sacrifice 
today, we might forget dependent children. North Carolina Baptists 
through Mills Home and Kennedy Home cannot forget them for 
several reasons: 

First, Jesus linked together Himself, children, and the Kingdom 
of God. He invited, even urged, the little children to come unto 
Him. He said, "Suffer the little children, and forbid them not, 
to come unto me, for of such is the kingdom of heaven." Jesus 
plainly taught that the characteristics of children, faith, absolute 
trust, and dependance on God, should characterize Kingdom people. 
He said, "Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little 
child, he shall not enter therein." It is God's Word that "Pure 
religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this. To visit 
the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself 
unspotted from the world." 

Again, the cause of the dependent child touches easily the heart 
and purse strings of Christians and sinners, and especially of Chris- 
tians. Our Orphanage leaders have carefully investigated every 
application, and every child possible has been accepted into our care. 
Each child is carefully studied, and we provide in the best way 
possible for 739 in the institution, 59 in their own homes, 28 in 
boarding homes, and make adjustments for a large number of others. 

Again, we shall not forget our children because of the increased 
calls due to war times. These calls will increase in number and in- 
tensity as war continues. It is true that mothers and wives suffer 
intensely in war, but children, innocent and helpless, are victims 
of war bodily, mentally, economically, socially, and spiritually. 108 
of our Orphanage boys without a single one's being refused because 
of physical defect have entered the service of Uncle Sam. Those 
boys and girls whom we have helped in the past are giving their 
best to God and country. But what about the increased number to 
be cared for in the months and years just ahead of us? We will not 
forget them in our prayers, in our once-a-month S. S. offering, in 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



our Thanksgiving offering, and in our support of Charity and 
Children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. TEAGUE. 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

34. The report on The American Bible Society was 
prepared by Rev. L. S. Gaines, but in his absence the 
report was read by Miss Ila Hensley, of Lexington. 

The report including a resolution therein was 
adopted. 

Miss Sallie McCracken presented some facts to the 
Association showing the work and accomplishments 
of The Society. 

She suggested that a collection be taken for The 
Society in each church on Bible Sunday, which is the 
second Sunday in December. 

Upon motion the suggestion was adopted by the 
body. 

Report on the work of the American Bible Society with sugges- 
tions to the churches as to how we may participate in helping: 
support this important agrency. To Liberty Baptist Association 
September 9, 1942. 

Southern Baptists have leaned heavily upon the American Bible 
Society for the supply of scriptures for their needs in the evangelistic 
outreach of their local churches and in their home and foreign mis- 
sion fields around the world. 

Under war conditions, the American Bible Society, in addition to 
continuing its service to Southern Baptists in most of our foreign 
fields, has now taken on the added responsibility of supplying scrip- 
tures in fields hitherto served by the British and Foreign Bible 
Society. 

Although the American Bible Society makes free gifts of books 
where circumstances require, most books are sold (at minimum cost) 
because the buyer will read and esteem more the book in which he 
has made a positive investment. But most people living on the 
low income levels prevailing in mission lands are not able to pay 
the production cost of even a gospel portion. The difference must 
be met by continual gifts from Bible-loving and missionary-minded 
Christian people. 

Because of the great strength of our Baptist people and the 
great number of churches in our Convention, no large amount would 
be required from any one church to raise a fund yearly which would 
enable us to put into the hands of millions of people on mission fields 
gospel portions which have proved to be the most fruitful form of 
scripture distribution. 

SOUTHERN BAPTISTS, taking cognizance of the important 
work of the American Bible Society, passed a resolution at the 1942 
San Antonio meeting as follows: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



"In order that the Bible may be kept in the widest circulation 
in these days when the work of missions is so greatly curtailed, we 
earnestly request the Secretaries of our State Conventions, our 
Editors, and our Pastors to call these facts to the attention of the 
churches with a view to the making of a suitable contribution from 
each church in the Convention to the work of the American Bible 
Society during the calendar year 1942." 

Our North Carolina Baptist State Convention, meeting in Ashe- 
ville in November, 1941, passed the following resolution in regard to 
the American Bible Society: "We would recommend that our 
churches recognize in a practical way the work of the American 
Bible Society, the one and only agency in the United States which 
publishes without profit the Sacred Scriptures without note or com- 
ment, for world-wide distribution. We would suggest that each 
church include in its annual budget for benevolence at least a small 
sum, for the work of this historic Kingdom agency." 

Your committee has ready for distribution today a quantity of 
tracts for each church, explaining the far-flung activities of the 
American Bible Society, and we suggest that the following resolution 
be passed at the proper time by this Association, to wit: 

That, whereas, we messengers of the Baptist churches of Liberty 
Association recognize, with appreciation, the great work of the 
American Bible Society — therefore — be it resolved 

That we urge our churches to place in their benevolent budgets 
for the coming year a worthy amount to be contributed to the 
American Bible Society, this gift to be sent at some convenient time 
to our State Secretary, Brother M. A. Huggins in Raleigh, marked — 
"For the American Bible Society." 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES. 

Lexington. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS CONCERNING LUNCH 

35. Rev. B. A. Mitchell, pastor of the host church, 
announced at this time the plans to be followed for 
lunch on the grounds at the dinner hour. 

SECOND DAY SERMON 

36. After song and prayer Dr. Ralph A. Herring, 
pastor of the First church at Winston-Salem, brought 
the sermon for the second day. 

His Scripture lesson was from First Peter, Chapter 
1, beginning with the 13th verse. 

His subject was 'The Holy Life." He stated that 
because of the neglect of this the standards of the 
Christian Life had been lowered. 

ADJOURNMENT 

37. The Association adjourned at 12:45 P. M. to 
reconvene at 1 :45 P. M. 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 
MISSIONARY ADDRESS 

38. For the sake of time the devotional Was dis- 
pensed with. 

Rev. Charles Leonard, who has been a missionary 
for many years in Manchura, China, but who is at 
home now due to war conditions, spoke to The Asso- 
ciation at this time. His subject was 'The Assets of 
Southern Baptists, Notwithstanding the War." He 
told of the great accomplishments in China and other 
parts of the globe by our missionaries. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

37. The report on W. M. U. was brought by Mrs. 
A. F. Warfford. 

After motion was made to adopt the report, 
Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the New Friendship 
church, spoke about this work. He told about the W. 
M. U. work in his church, which is the only church in 
the association that has all Al W. M. U. organizations. 

The report was adopted. 

The Women's Missionary Union, whether it be auxiliary to The 
Southern Baptist Convention, The Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina, or to Liberty Baptist Association, consists of a devout and 
far-seeing group of Baptist women and young people. 

On January 1, 1942, in North Carolina there were 4,075 organi- 
zations with a membership of 83,521. 

On Jauray 1, 1942, in Liberty Association there were 87 such 
organizations with 2,056 members in 23 churches. 

These women and young people are engaged in a systematic 
study of the various mission fields and the challenge presented by 
each. As evidence of their fully rounded vision of service, we 
mention the following: 

1— Eighty-nine mission study classes in which 935 persons were 
enrolled, 

2 — Ninety-two memberships carried in the Hundred Thousand 
Club, with reports coming in of new memberships having 
been added recently, 

3— The Personal Service which is evidenced through soul-win- 
ning, and in the improvement of interracial relations; also 
by the fact that several groups of women in our country 
churches have provided New Testaments for the men in the 
service of our country, 

4 — The special efforts made to enlist more of our young people 
through the organization of more groups for them was given 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



Upon motion to adopt the report, Mr. Wall spoke 
briefly of the report. Following Mr. Wall, Mr. J. B. 
Willis, pastor of the Baptist church at Hamlet, N. C, 
presented to the body some facts concerning the dis- 
tressing conditions of Wake Forest College, due to the 
fact that so many students from the college are being 
drafted into the army. 

The report was adopted. 

More than a century ago our forefathers realized the great need 
of an educated ministry and cultured laity, therefore 108 years ago 
Wake Forest College was established. All of our North Carolina 
Baptist Schools have been founded with a primary view of enriching 
the lives of our Baptist youth and through them the life of our 
denomination. The beneficient effects of our endeavors have spread 
far beyond the confines of our denomination and of our State. 
Products of our institutions are serving in hundreds of useful occu- 
pations and the remotest corners of the globe. We find them in the 
United States Senate, in federal judgeships, in important posts of 
Government administration, in business, in agriculture, in all of the 
professions, in the armed forces of our nation and in the humbler 
walks of life. Wherever the world's work is to be done and men and 
women of character and of intelligence are needed, sooner or later 
you will find the products of our North Carolina Baptist schools 
taking their place there. 

For one hundred and eight years our State Convention has been 
working at this task of Christian Education. It now supports seven 
colleges. The enrollment of college students in these institutions for 



the session 1941-1942 was as follows: 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE: Total enrollment 1,061 

Summer School enrollment 595 

Ministerial Students 118 

Baptist Ministerial Students Ill 

MEREDITH COLLEGE: Total enrollment 497 

Summer School enrollment 73 

Baptist students enrolled 321 

CHOWAN COLLEGE: Total enrollment 74 

MARS HILL COLLEGE: Total enrollment 896 

Summer School enrollment 172 

Ministerial Students 49 

Baptist students 665 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE: Total enrollment 305 

Summer school enrollment 37 

Ministerial students 19 

WINGATE COLLEGE: Total enrollment 163 

Summer School enrollment 50 

Baptist Students 100 

BOILING SPRINGS COLLEGE: Total enrollment 106 

Baptists enrolled 77 



Our State Convention is contributing to these institutions for 
current expenses the following sums: Wake Forest, $10,000; Meredith, 



26 



MINUTES OP THE 



$7,500; Mars Hill College, $7,000; Campbell College, $9,000; Chowan, 
$3,000; Wingate, $1,250. Besides these contributions the Convention 
is paying some $80,000 for the retirement of the debt contracted in 
rebuilding Meredith College. During the past three years more than 
$300,000 worth of physical equipment has been added to Mars Hill 
campus. 

In 1939 the Convention set itself to erect a Chapel at Wake 
Forest College. Earnest efforts have been made from the state office 
in Raleigh and from the college to carry forward this enterprise. 
T"he building as originally planned was to house not only a large 
auditorium to seat over two thousand persons but also the depart- 
ments of Bible and Music. The plans have been so modified as to 
call for the erection of two buildings at the approximate cost of the 
one originally projected. One of these will accommodate the two 
departments mentioned, the other will constitute the chapel proper. 
Progress is being made daily on both of them. 

In our colleges in 1941-1942 there were 237 ministerial students. 
One half of them were at Wake Forest. 

Through the years the educational program of our State Con- 
vention has had many ups and downs. But few periods have been 
more trying upon them than the present. The armed forces of our 
country are absorbing most of the men of college age and many 
others are being lured into lucrative positions made plentiful by the 
war effort. Many members of the teaching and administrative staffs 
of these institutions are being called into military service. Wake 
Forest alone has lost some seventeen members of its staff. The 
financial side of these institutions is being affected as seriously as 
the personnel. Invested funds are yielding a lower and lower return. 
All of this readily shows the need of our loyal support of our colleges 
in these critical times. 

These institutions are doing all that they can in order to meet 
the present situation. For example, Wake Forest has lately taken 
what seems to me to be one of the wisest steps, as per the action 
of the Board of Trustees by unanimously adopting the following 
resolutions : 

Board of Trustees — ^minutes — Special meeting January 15, 1942. 

"RESOLVED, That favorable action be taken on the first item 
in Dean Bryan's report, with the provision that young women of 
junior or senior standing may be admitted to Wake Forest College 
on the same terms as men for the duration of the war, and that 
those admitted in this period be allowed to complete their college 
training at Wake Forest." Adopted. 

Board of Trustees— Minutes, Commencement Meeting May 25, 
1942: 

"It is voted to delete the phrase 'for the duration of the war' 
in the resolution admitting women of junior and senior grade to 
Wake Forest as passed on January 15, 1942." 

You will note they have admitted girls of junior and senior 
standing. This action is entirely in accord with our Baptist educa- 
tional policy of co-education as seen in all of our junior institutions. 
It will doubtless hold many of our girls to our Baptist program. It 
will enrich the social life at Wake Forest and will make it possible 
for our great institution to carry on its educational work under a 
more normal condition. Life for our young people both before and 
after college is in a man and woman world. There is no rational 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday after the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1943. 

PLACE— First Church, Lexington. 

PREACHER— Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 

ALTERNATE PREACHER— Rev. T. W. BRAY. 

C. M. WALL, 
C. E. SPURGEON, 
G. W. MILLER, 
Committee. 

RESOLUTION IN RE SPECIAL DAY OF PRAYER 

41. The committee heretofore appointed by the 
Moderator to make recommendations to the Body con- 
cerning a resolution offered yesterday by Rev. W. K. 
McGee; recommended that said resolution be adopted 
by the body. 

Their recommendation was adopted, and it was 
voted by the Association that Rev. W. K. McGee be 
empowered to present it to the Baptist State Conven- 
tion. 

The First Baptist Church of Thomasville, N. C, in conference 
Sunday, September 6, 1942: 

Be it resolved that the Liberty Baptist Association recommend 

to the Baptist State Convention, in session in High Point, November 
17-19, 1942, that it petition the President of our United States as 
follows: 

To the President of the United States of America: 

We, the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, representa- 
tive of more than half a million members of the Baptist Churches 
of North Carolina, make earnest request of our honored President 
that he declare some Sunday in the near future to be a day to be 
observed by the people of these United States as a day of rest and 
fasting and prayer; that, as a testimony to our faith in God and 
our dependence upon God, all defence industry, and all civilian 
activities save those which minister to a definite human need, ob- 
serve this day from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday as a 
day of rest; that all our people who can without endangering their 
health observe it as a day of fasting before Almighty God; and that 
our people make it a day of earnest and penitent prayer, prayer 
of thanksgiving for God's great goodness and mercy to us as a nation, 
prayer of repentance and confession of our sins as individuals and 
as a nation, prayer for strength and divine leadership for our 
President and for all our nation's leaders, prayer for God's blessings 
upon men in the armed forces of our country, prayer that God will- 
ing, we may be directed to a righteous victory for the United Nations 
unto the Glory of God and unto the good of the people of all the 
nations of the earth. 

W. K. McGee, Pastor. 

JNO. M. HAYES, Chairman of Deacons. 



36 



MINUTES OF THE 



RESOLUTION IN RE LIQUOR AND WAR 

42. Sam J. Smith at this time offered the follow- 
ing resolution, which was adopted. 

"We are at war. Alcohol and war do not mix .any better than 
alcohol and gasoline. Perhaps a mere voter and a modest taxpayer 
should not be expected to bother his head about the conduct of 
the war, but the fundamental strategy seems to be for us to drink 
our way to victory. 

"Baptists have always been patriotic and loyal— we still are. We 
say to the President and Congress that we will give our money, we 
will give our time, and we will give our thought, we will make every 
sacrifice; v/e will give our sons and we will give ourselves in order 
that this war may be fought to a successful conclusion. But we 
insist that when our sons go into camp, these camps be no longer 
recruiting centers for beer interests and liquor dealers, but that they 
be clean and wholesome, in order that our boys may give their 
best to their country; and, if in the providence of God they are 
called to fill a hero's grave, that they may go down to that end 
with a clean breath and a clear head as befits the men fighting in a 
righteous cause for a self-respecting nation." 

For these reasons along with many others too numerous to 
mention, be it hereby resolved that we, The Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion assembled in our 110th session ask the next session of The 
Baptist State Convention to petition our President of these United 
States and our Congress for the present banishment of liquor and 

strong drinks from our sailors and soldiers and the speedy enact- 
ment of National prohibition. 

And furthermore to petition the next session of the Legislature 
of our state for a state-wide referendum on prohibition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAM J. SMITH. 



REPORT ON COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE PER- 
SONS TO BRING THE REPORTS NEXT YEAR 

43. The following recommendations of the com- 
mittee were adopted. 

We recommend the following: 

NAME & OBJECT ADDRESS 

Baptist Hospitals— D. S. Hayworth High Point, N. O. 

B. T. U.— Vessie Gellespie Thomasville, N. C. 

Christian Education — J. A. McMillan Thomasville, N. C. 

Home Missions— Mrs. C. C. Coppedge Thomasville, N. C. 

Foreign Missions — ^Rev. E. F. Mumford Rt. 1, High Point, N. C. 

State Missions — ^^Rev. C. C. Eddinger Welcome, N, C. 

Mills Home-<:;. C. Wall Lexington, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement — Rev. N. C. Teague, Erlanger 

Religious Literature Rev. E. C. Roach, Erlanger 

Digest of Church Letters and State of Churches John Jarrett, 

Lexington, R. 6 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



impetus by Miss Myrtle Zentmeyer in her ten-day visit in 
Liberty Association in June, 
5 — During the first six months of 1942 Liberty Women's Mis- 
sionary Union gave to the Co-Operative Program— $2,397.80, 
and through special offerings to Home Missions, Hundred 
Thousand Club, Foreign Missions, Baptist Hospital, etc.,— 
$2,131.91, making a total of $4,429.71. 
Again this year we wish to pay special tribute to the W. M. U. 
of New Friendship Baptist Church. This loyal Society has been A-1 
and fully graded for EIGHT consecutive years, and has received a 
mission gift from every resident woman m.ember for FIVE consecu- 
tive years. In addition every one of the organizations is participat- 
ing in the Hundred Thousand Club. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. A. P. WARFPORD, 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

38. The report on Public Morals and Law Enforce- 
ment was made by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor of the 
Mills Home church. 

The report was adopted. 

This Baby on our doorstep has been there too long without 
something being done for it. We HAVE gone so far as to find out 
why it cries, but have done little or nothing to stop it from crying. 
In his report last year. Brother Teague expressed the opinion that 
this report should be given a place on the program the very first 
day of the Association, but the committee on the order of business 
must have overlooked this in arranging the program for we find it 
right back where it was before, near the end of the program on the 
second day. Frankly, I agree with Brother Teague, for I believe 
that this report should receive far more attention than it has 
heretofore, because it deals with a matter that is of vital imporance 
to every Christian who has any regard for law and order, and for 
those fundamental principles which are the foundation of a decent, 
clean, and wholesome social life. 

In regard to the matter of Public Morals and Law Enforcement 
let me give you some facts gleaned from here and there. Dr. Daniel 
Poling stated recently that he was in Singapore in 1939, and saw 
the Saturday night binge of the Europeans stationed there. Never, 
never, anywhere, he said, had he ever seen men so disgustingly 
drunk. When he mildly suggested that some day the Japanese might 
come, he created a gale of laughter and an offer: "Have a drink, 
American, we'll take care of the Jap when he comes." 

Isn't it rather significant that all places of liquor sale were 
closed and kept closed for more than two months after Pearl Har- 
bor, and that out of the 428 booze joints operated within 12 miles 
of Pearl Harbor, 235 were operated by native Japanese? 

It is a strange paradox to me that the U. S. Navy does not 
permit booze aboard a battleship or any other ship, and yet the 
sailors can buy liquor at some government sponsored bar or canteen. 
No soldier is allowed to drink while on duty, but in his off time he 
can buy liquor at the army post. The Brewer's Digest of May, 1941, 



32 



MINUTES OF THE 



said: "One of the finest things that could have happened to the 
brewing industry was the insistence by high ranking officers to 
make beer available at army camps. Here is a chance for brewers 
to cultivate the largest beer consuming section of our i>opulatioh." 

Of course we are not saying that all our soldiers and sailors 
drink, but we do say that any member of our armed- forces who does 
drink, be he private or officer, undermines the strength and breaks 
down the morale of our fighting forces to that extent. One drunk 
soldier in the whole U. S. Army is one drunk soldier too many; 
one drunk] sailor in the whole U. S, Navy is one drunk sailor too 
many. 

Judge Joseph T. Zattali of Massachusetts said recently: "Take all 
the jails and houses of correction in the State, bunch them together, 
and you will find that 95% of prisoners in them are there because 
of alcoholism and crimes connected with it." Jjast year 40O women 
were in the Women's House of Detention in New York, suffering 
from acute alcoholism, and more than half of them were under 30 
years of age. In that gripping article by Dr. Hargett of Louisville, 
Ky., entitled "America's Most Dangerous Saboteur" he makes this 
startling statement: "I take you to Washington, D, C, the home of 
our government, the place where the leaders of our nation reside, 
the men who are piloting the ship of state through this storm. Wash- 
ington is the wettest spot in the nation. The per capita consumpion 
of alcohol in the' District of Columbia is almost twice that of the 
wettest state in the Union. ... In Washington, where they need 
the clearest heads, the steadiest nerves, and the highest morals, they 
are drinking the most booze." 

An average of 65 quarts of alcoholic beverage for every man, 
woman, and child in the U. S. is being consiuned every year, an 
average of VA quarts per week. 

Secretary of War Stimson, when visited by a group of church- 
men representing the Federal Council of Churches, told them bluntly 
that church efforts to cope with the liquor problem should be handled 
on a community-wide basis, rather than by attempts to pass special 
legislation concerning the sale of liquor to men in uniform. He went 
on to say that it would not be conducive to good morale, if men in 
uniform were denied the right to buy liquor while civilians were 
allowed to purchase it as easily as ever. 

The Chicago Sun recently quoted Warden Frank Sain of the 
Cook County jail in regard to the increasing critical problems con- 
cerning young criminal offenders in Chicago and surrounding coun- 
try. Warde Sain, who was a machine gunner in the first World War, 
has spent 23 years as jail guard and warden. More than 20% of the 
prisoners in the Cook County jail are under 21 years of age. They 
tell the same story: "Too much easy money, liquor, gangs, then — 
trouble with the law." Sain advises parents not to let their boys 
grow up too fast, nor to let them have too much money to spend, 
and urges them to attend church with their children. He stresses 
two things: Return to religion, and basic home training. 

Dr. R. A. Vonderlehr, Assistant U, S. Surgeon- General, said 
that if the public — fathers, mothers, wives, and sweethearts, knew 
the extent to which prostitution exists around some army and navy 
encampments, "they would go to town in getting it cleaned up." 
Dr. Vonderlehr told a press conference that no attempt has been 
made to enforce the May law which gives the Army power to call for 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



a federal cleanup of prescribed areas if local and state authorities 
fail to do so. Draftees, all of whom were free from venereal disease 
when accepted, are becoming infected at an increasing rate. 

Some 54% of adult Americans gambled in some form during thP. 
past year, and of that number, 24% participated in some type of 
church lottery. The same number played cards or dice for money, 
or used slot machines. Only 9% bet on horse races. Church lot- 
teries gained almost 20 million participants last year. 

Inspirtatlonal talks are excellent. They are needed, but they 
are merely a step in the right direction. If they do not lead to 
definite action, they are a waste of time and breath. Year after 
year, we have recorded in the Minutes of our Convention and our 
Association some of the finest reports ever made upon this all im- 
portant question, but they too are a waste of time and are not 
worth the paper and ink used if they do not result in an aroused 
Christian sentiment, developing into definite, constructive action 
against the very evils we lament and deplore. We need to clean 
up our political offices. We need to use our vote wisely. We need 
persistent campaign of enlightenment, of teaching and training, 
informing our growing youth of the evils of drink. We need to 
build again the family altar in our homes, that succeeding genera- 
tions may learn to worship and revere and honor God and His Word. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON. 

ADDRESS BY MR. L. A. MARTIN 

At this time Rev. J. A. Neilson presented to the 
Body, Hon. L. A. Martin, of Lexington, N. C, who 
presented to The Association some of the evils of the 
liquor business and suggestions as to its eradication. 
He stated that the man to be feared most in the eradi- 
cation of the liquor business was the man who kept it 
in his basement and was a churchman. 

SPECIAL COLLECTION 

39. At this time a Special Collection was taken for 
the Dry Forces of North Carolina. 

The sum of $20.73 was raised and turned over to 
Rev. A. N. Harrell, who was present. Mr. Harrell 
being a representative of the said N. C. Dry Forces. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

40. The report on Ministerial Relief was offered 
by Rev. W. K. McGee, it was adopted without reading 
or discussion. 

The Relief and Annuity Board of our Southern Baptist Conven- 



34 



MINUTES OP THE 



tion is now in its twenty-fifth year of work and is planning to 
celebrate its silver anniversary next May when the Southern Baptist 
Convention meets in Memphis. 

During this period our Board has made a fine record of service 
and growth. Its assets have grown from a little over $100,000 at the 
end of its first year of operation to approximately five and a half 
million dollars at the end of 1941. Its income in 1941 was more than 
a million dollars, while it paid out in Relief and Annuity benefits 
more than one-half million dollars. The Board is serving ministers, 
missionaries, denominational workers, and widows of ministers. 2,500 
of these are already receiving benefits from the Board. 

Nearly 6,000 Southern Baptist pastors are now participating in 
the Ministers Retirement Plan, with approximately 8,000 churches 
cooperating. Our Foreign Mission Board, Home Mission Board, State 
Mission Boards, and other Agencies and Institutions of the Southern 
Baptist Convention have plans with the Board whereby their em- 
ployees are being protected against the days of old age and perma- 
nent illnses. 

Our North Carolina Baptist State Convention has a plan with 
the Relief and Annuity Board which we believe to be superior to 
those of most other states. Under this plan a pastor pays 4% of his 
salary each month, the church, or churches, of which he is pastor 
pays 4%, and our State Convention adds $18.00 per year to the 
amount. This makes provision for a good retirement annuity which 
the pastor will receive when he wishes to retire after he has reached 
the age of 65, or an annuity which he will receive before he reaches 
65 if he should becom.e disabled, or for his dependents, in case of 
his death. 

Several churches and pastors in the Liberty Association are 
already participating in our North Carolina plan. We hope the 
day will soon come when every church in the Association, with its 
pastor, becomes a participating church. Probably the most con- 
venient time to begin it would be when the church budget is made 
up this fall for the new year. But preparation should be begun for 
it now. Write to Mr. Huggins for full information on the plan and 
see that the matter is brought before the church at the proper 
time. We wish to urge our churches and pastors not to neglect this 
important matter. Delay means decrease, if not loss, of income for 
old age, or for the pastor broken in health before old age arrives, 
or for the widow and children of the pastor who has entered into 
his eternal inheritance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. K. MoGEE. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE 
AND PREACHER 

The committee recommended the following which 
was adopted: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME. PLACE AND PREACHER 

We recommend for your adoption the following: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



Ministerial Relief-— G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C. 

Sunday Schools— Rev. L. J. Matthews Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

W. M. U.— Mrs. S, O. Hinkle Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Committee. 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

44. The following report was adopted : 

We, the undersigned, Finance Committee have checked the 
reports of Mr. Sam J. Smith, clerk of the Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion, and have found them to be true and correct, as reported. 

The amount of $201.58 has been paid to date on the 1942 minute 
fund, with each Church reported paid in full, or in part as per 
quota. 

Your committee recommends to the Association, a resolution to 
pay to the clerk of the Association the amount of $50.00 per year 
for his responsible and faithful services, provided that amount is 
available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. W. BRAY, Chairman, 
JOHNNIE CARRICK, 
K. C. LAMBRETH, 
G. C. PALMER. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

45. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer of The Association, 
made his report, which was adopted. 

Reoeiots For tlh© 1941 Session 



To Balance on hand from last year (1940) 95 

To Amount collected for 1941 Minute Fund 201.58 



Total receipts $202.53 

Disbursements 

Paid for Clerical help $10.00 

Postage and Stationery 11.25 

Dispatch Printing Minutes 124.80 

Retained for Salary 45.00 



Total $191.05 $191.05 

Balance on hand 11.58 



$202.53 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

PROVISION MADE FOR AN EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATION 

46. Pursuant to a resolution offered yesterday by 



38 



MINUTES OP THE 



Rev. J. A. Neilson and an amendment offered thereto 
by Rev. W. K. McGee and the appointment by the 
Moderator to study said amendment, a committee. 

The committee brought the following report which 
was adopted. 

Your committee recommends that: 

An executive committee of the Association be formed of seven 
members, including the Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the 
chairman of the executive-promotion committee, and four other 
members elected by the Association along with the other officers 
of the Association; the committee to attend to associational business 
between the annual meetings, their actions to be reported to and 
reviewed by the Association annually. (This executive committee 
will transact associational business; the promotion-executive com- 
mittee will promote the interests of the Association and co-operative 
program as formerly.) 

W. K. McGEE, 
G. C. PALMER, 
J. A. NEILSON. 

APPOINTMENT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

After the adoption of the above resolution, Sam J. 
Smith made motion that the Moderator be instructed 
to name the four members therein provided for and 
not named therein. The motion was adopted. 

Whereupon the Moderator named the following 
members: Rev. N. C. Teague, Mr. C. V. Teague, Rev. 
L. J. Matthews and Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 

REPORT OF COUNCIL IN RE ADMISSION OF 
MISSION SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

47. The Council on the Admission of New Churches 
having had submitted to them for consideration the 
Admission of the Johnsontown and Floyd Sunday 
Schools as Mission Sunday Schools of the Association. 

Made recommendation that they be received into 
the Body as Mission Sunday Schools. 

The recommendation was adopted. 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

48. The Resolutions Committee offered the follow- 
ing which was adopted. 

We the members and friends of the Liberty Baptist Association, 
extend to the members of the Liberty, and Abbotts Creek Baptist 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



Ministerial Relief— G. W. Miller liexington, N. C. 

Sunday Schools— Rev. L. J. Matthews Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

W. M. U.— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Committee. 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

44. The following report was adopted : 

We, the undersigned, Finance Committee have checked the 
reports of Mr. Sam J. Smith, clerk of the Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion, and have found them to be true and correct, as reported. 

The amount of $201.58 has been paid to date on the 1942 minute 
fund, with each Church reported paid in full, or in part as per 
quota. 

Your committee recommends to the Association, a resolution to 
pay to the clerk of the Association the amount of $50.00 per year 
for his responsible and faithful services, provided that amount is 
available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. W. BRAY, Chairman, 
JOHNNIE CARRICK, 
K, C. LAMBRETH, 
G. C. PALMER. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

45. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer of The Association, 
made his report, which was adopted. 

Receipts Far tihe 1941 Session 



To Balance on hand from last year (1940) 95 

To Amount collected for 1941 Minute Fund 201.58 



Total receipts $202.53 

Disbursements 

Paid for Clerical help $10.00 

Postage and Stationery 11.25 

Dispatch Printing Minutes 124.80 

Retained for Salary 45.00 



Total $191.05 $191,05 

Balance on hand 11.58 



$202.53 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

PROVISION MADE FOR AN EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATION 

46. Pursuant to a resolution offered yesterday by 



38 



MINUTES OP THE 



Rev. J. A. Neilson and an amendment offered thereto 
by Rev. W. K. McGee and the appointment by the 
Moderator to study said amendm.ent, a committee. 

The committee brought the following report which 
was adopted. 

Your committee recommends that: 

An executive committee of the Association be formed of seven 
members, including the Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the 
chairman of the executive-promotion committee, and four other 
members elected by the Association along with the other officers 
of the Association; the committee to attend to associational business 
between the annual meetings, their actions to be reported to and 
reviewed by the Association annually. (Thi^ executive committee 
will transact associational business; the promotion- executive com- 
mittee will promote the interests of the Association and co-operative 
program as formerly.) 

W. K. McGEE, 
G. C. PALMER, 
J. A. NEILSON. 

APPOINTMENT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

After the adoption of the above resolution, Sam J. 
Smith made motion that the Moderator be instructed 
to name the four members therein provided for and 
not named therein. The motion was adopted. 

Whereupon the Moderator named the following 
members: Rev. N. C. Teague, Mr. C. V. Teague, Rev. 
L. J. Matthews and Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 

REPORT OF COUNCIL IN RE ADMISSION OF 
MISSION SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

47. The Council on the Admission of New Churches 
having had submitted to them for consideration the 
Admission of the Johnsontown and Floyd Sunday 
Schools as Mission Sunday Schools of the Association. 

Made recommendation that they be received into 
the Body as Mission Sunday Schools. 

The recommendation was adopted. 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

48. The Resolutions Committee offered the follow- 
ing which was adopted. 

We the members and friends of the Liberty Baptist Association, 
extend to the members of the Liberty, and Abbotts Creek Baptist 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



Churches, and friends of the communities, our sincere thanks and 
gratitude for their gracious entertainment and hospitality shown us 
while in your midst. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. ROACH, 

R. A. TATE, 

L. E. TEAGUE, 

M. M. SMITH, 

R. C. WALL. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 
AND ADJOURNMENT 

49. The Association stands in honor of our mem- 
bers who have died during the year. 

The list was read by Rev. C. C. Eddinger, pastor 
of the Welcome church. 

Closing prayer by Rev. N. C. Teague, pastor of 
Reeds church. 

(For list of deceased members see page 49.) 

The Association adjourned at 4:30 P. M. to recon- 
vene at 8:00 P. M. 



EVENING SESSION, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 9th 

50. The Association re-convened at 8:00 P. M. 

The devotional was conducted by Miss Ila Hensley 
of Lexington. 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

51. The report on B. T. U. was made by Miss Eliz- 
abeth Smith. 

The report was adopted. 

The B. T. U. work was discussed by Mr. Wilbur 
Lewis, Associational Director, and others present. 

Under the capable leadership of Mr. Wilbur Levvis our Liberty 
Associational Training Union has held some very interesting meet- 
ings this year. One of our greatest means of growth has been help- 
ful and interesting conferences at these meetings. 

A most inspiring message by Dr. Clay I. Hudson was brought 
to our one-day associational conference, held at Thomasville First 
Church last November 24th. A large majority of our Unions was 
well represented and all felt the great need of returning to their 
individual churches with a greater determination to make plans for 



40 



MINUTES OF THE 



a more spiritual growth in each Union. 

Comparing the reports of this year with last year we find 
we have a lossf of twelve Unions and a loss of 160 in membership 
due to the fact that many of our young people had to answer the 
call and service of our country. We are happy to report that Wall- 
burg has five new Unions this year. At this time last year they had 
no Union at all. We are happy to note Mills Home has organized 
two new Unions. Abbotts Creek, Oak Hill Memorial and Reeds each 
have a new Union to report. 

Dr. Clay I. Hudson says that the Training Union is no longer a 
place for training a few of our finest young people, but this new day 
sounds a call long and loud and clear for an "all out" for training. 
Where will we be, where will we get, without capable trained adults? 
The very thoughte of such a question bring to mind a vast multitude 
of untrained, unenlisted, adult church members. We are to win to 
Christ, but we must also train all we have won to Christ to witness 
for Him too. Not only are these adults to witness for Christ, but also 
they are to be trained so as to be able to lead others to go out and 
witness for Christ. In the army of our country every soldier Is to 
be trained so as to be able to do his part well. In the army of our 
Lord, every Christian who has enlisted in service for his King should 
be trained to be a good soldier of our Lord Jesus Christ. There is 
much said and done these days about home defense, but the greatest 
home defense we can do is to enlist and train every church member 
in our churches. Then may each and every one realize and heed 
the great Commission. 



52. The session for the year closed with prayer for 
benedictions on its activities. 

Adjournment. 



MINUTES OF AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

Following are the minutes of the Associational W. 
M. U., Sunday School and Baptist Training Union 
meetings held at times other than that of The Associa- 
tion, and which were adopted to be included in the 
Minutes of the Association. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH SMITH. 



Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
Moderator 



Sam J. Smith, 
Clerk 



PROCEEDINGS 



W. M. U. OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 



FOR THE YEAR 1942 



The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association met with 
Holloways Baptist Church, April 30, 1942. The meeting was called 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



to order by the superintendent, Mrs. L. S. Gaines. The congregation 
sang, "O Zion Haste," as the opening hymn. The devotional was led 
by Mrs, Fletcher Wall, of the Lexington First Church, A hearty 
welcome was extended by Rev, H. M. Stroup, pastor of Holloways 
Baptist church, and Mrs. Ben Carroll, of Denton, gave the response. 
Attention was called to the anticipated visit of Miss Myrtle Zent- 
meyer, W. M. U. Field Worker. Visitors were recognized at this time. 

The minutes of the 1941 meeting were read for information. The 
following committees were appointed: RESOLUTIONS: Mrs. R. S. 
Green, First Church, Thomasville; Mrs. Graham Barnes, Church- 
land; Mrs. Marvin Perkins, Erlanger. Place: Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, New 
Friendship; Mrs. J. A. Neilson, Mills Home; Mrs. C. L. Black, Thom- 
asville. 

The nominating committee had been previously appointed, con- 
sisting of: Miss Sallie McCracken, Mills Home; Mrs. Luther Mat- 
thews, New Friendship; Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Stoners Grove. 

The roll call revealed 75 delegates from 18 churches. At this 
time each president gave a very brief report of their work. Following 
the singing of the hymn "The Morning Light Is Breaking," reports 
of the associational work were given, 

STEWARDSHIP: The Stewardship report was read by Miss Ila 
Hensley in the absence of Mrs. P, M. Hendricks, chairman. The 
present report revealed: 

Tithers : 

W. M. S. Y. W. A. G. A. R. A. S. B. 

100 22 79 52 47 

100,000 Club Memberships: 

781 4i 3 5 1 

This is a gratifying increase over the previous year, 
PERSONAL SERVICE: Given by Mrs. Reid Smith, chairman. 
This report showed that most of the societies have organized personal 
service and that there is an increased interest in soul-winning. A 
study of soul-winning books was recommended. 



MISSION STUDY: Given by Mrs. I. G. Greer, chairman. 



W. M. S. Y. 


W. A. 


G. A. 


R, A. 


S. B. 


Number classes held: 










39 


22 


12 


7 


9 


Number enrolled in classes: 










497 


153 


140 


45 


100 


Number Reading cards: 










16 


16 


5 






Number Reading stamps: 
6 

Certificates awarded: 


















4 (Cont.) 


34 


54 


3 


65 


Number Seals: 











283 (Silver) 96 99 33 87 

1 (Honor) 
1 (Garnet) 

Record card No. 1: 

82 

Record Card No. 2: 

12 

Stewardship Books: 

1 



42 



MINUTES OP THE 



Mission Study Institute: 
1 

Schools of Missions: 

2 

The chairman pointed out that in the course of the last five 
years there has been a constantly growing interest in Mission Study. 

TRAINING SCHOOL: Given by Mrs. R. G. Jennings, chairman. 
She reported that a box of monograrnmed stationery was sent as a 
Valentine to each N. C. girl in the Training School. 

LITERATURE: Given by Mrs. Luther Matthews, chairman. Mrs. 
Matthews urged us anew to take full advantage of the wholesome 
and helpful literature published by the Southwide Woman's Union. 

The above reports were adopted by acclamation. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT: Mrs. Gaines presented her 
report in a mimeograph form. This showed the following extra 
meetings had been held: 

May — Executive Committee Planning Meeting. 

July — Young People's Rally, held at Thomasville, First Church; 
Speaker — Dr. Halph Herring. 

Personal Service and Enlistment Conference held at Stoners 
Grove; Mrs. C. C. Currin, of Winston-Salem, led the Personal Serv- 
ice Conference. Mrs. Victor Andrews, of Ramseur, conducted dis- 
cussion on enlistment. 

October — ^Mission Study Institute held at Mills Home, Mrs. L. B. 
Olive, of China Grove, conducted the study. 

January — Study of Year Book held at Lexington, First Church. 
Discussions by associational chairmen. Mrs. Gilmer Cross taught 
"Telling You How" to third vice presidents. 



W. M. S.— (A-1) New Friendship, Wallburg; (B) Mills Home, 
Reeds, Lexington First; (C) Erlanger, Jersey, Reid Street. 

Y. W. A.— (A-1) New Friendship; (B) Lexington First, Reeds; 
(C) Erlanger, Thomasville First. 

G. A.— (A-1) Mills Home (Alda Grayson), New Friendship (Jun- 
ior and Intermediate), Reeds; (B) Reid Street, Mills Home (Naomi 
Schell and Lockett), Thomasville First (Junior); (B) Mills Home 
(Vallie Page). 

R, A. — (A-1) New Friendship (Junior and Intermediate), Reeds; 
(B) Lexington First, Erlanger (Junior and Intermediate), Mills 
Home (Judson), Thomasville First; (C) Mills Home (Junior). 

Sunbeams — (A-1) New Friendship, Reeds; (B) Lexington First, 
Mills Home, Thomasville First. 



SPECIAL MENTION 

New Friendship — ^A-1, fully graded — 8 consecutive years. Mis- 
sion gift from every resident woman member — 5 consecutive years. 
Hundred Thousand Club participation by all organizations. 



HONOR ROLL 



FULLY GRADED UNIONS 



Erlanger 
Lexington First 
Mills Home 



New Friendship 
Reeds 

Thomasville First 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 43 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Co-operative Program $4,230.24 

Hundred Thousand Club 1,056.23 

Other Objects 3,184.74 

Total raised 1941 $8,471.21 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Receipts: 

In Treasury January 1, 1941 S18.ll 

Received during 1941 $34.50 



Total ..$52.61 $52.61 

Disbursements : 

Divisional Expense Fund, Mrs. Prank Hauser $ 5.00 

Postage, etc., Mrs. L. S. Gaines 5.00 

Executive Committee and Mrs. L. S. Gaines 10.00 

Speaker at Stoners Grove (Conference) 1.00 

Reports, etc., Mrs. L. S. Gaines 3.00 

Mission Study Institute, Mrs. L. B. Olive 3.0O 

Reports, Mrs. L. S. Gaines • 2.00 



Totals $29.00 $29.00 



Balance in Treasury, January 1, 1942 $23.61 



MRS. C. C. EDDINGER, Treasurer. 

Very appropriately the hymn "We've A Story To Tell To The 
Nations" was sung previous to a Missionary Address by Miss Ruby 
Daniel, Baptist Missionary, who very recently had been forced by 
war conditions to leave her work in Budapest, Hungary. She very 
realistically presented the cause of Christian Missions and the need 
of Christi^in living in war torn Europe. 

The morning program was closed with prayer by Rev. H. M. 
Stroup, after which we were entertained in the grove with a bounti- 
ful lunch prepared by the ladies of Holloways Baptist Church. 

The afternoon session was opened by singing the hymn "Near 
The Cross." Mrs. J. A. Neilson led the opening prayer. The dele- 
gates now considered themselves in a business session. A report 
was given by the committee appointed in 1941 to ascertain the will 
of the individual churches regarding the change in the method of 
providing lunch at Associational wide meetings held by W. M. U. of 
this Association. This committee consisted of Mrs. A. P. Warfford, 
Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Mrs. C. C. Edinger. All churches were contacted 
and 16 responded, all 16 churches favoring the proposed plan of each 
woman bringing her own lunch and the hostess church furnishing 
a dessert and drink. Since this was a majority of the churches the 
vote proved to be unanimously in favor of this plan. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 
Resolutions 

The committee on resolutions on behalf of the W. M. U. of 
Liberty Association wish to extend to the women of Holloways 
Church deep gratitude for the hospitality displayed in the cordial 
v^^elcome extended and the abundant and delicious food they served. 

Also we want to thank each person who made the program pos- 
sible and to express our appreciation to Miss Ruby Daniel and Mrs. 



44 



MINUTES OF THE 



Gilmer Cross for their fine and inspirational messages. 

The exceptionally beautiful flov/ers also added to the enjoyment 
of the day in this old and historical church. 

Respectfully Bubmitted, 
MRS. R. S. GREEN, 
MRS. MARVIN PERKINS, 
MRS. GRAHAM BARNES. 

Place 

We, the committee on place, recommend that the W. M. U. of 
the Liberty Association meet with Reeds Baptist Church in April, 
1943. 

MRS. S. O. HINKLE, 
MRS. J. A. NEILSON, 
MRS. C. L. BLACK. 

Nominating 

Superintendent — Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent — Mrs. C. C. Coppedge, Thomasville. 

Young People's Leader — Mrs. N. C. Teague, Rt. 3, Lexington. 

Personal Service — Mrs. Reid Smith, Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Mission Study — ^Mrs. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. 

Stev/ardship — Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer— Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Training School — Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 

Royal Ambassador Leader— Rev. N. C. Teague, Rt. 3, Lexington. 

SALLIE L. MCCRACKEN, 
MRS. A. P. WARPPORD, 
MRS. L. J. MATTHEWS. 

The above were unnanimously elected. 

MEMORIAL SERVICE 
(Conducted by Mrs. I. P. Prazier) 

We wish to pause and pay tribute to those faithful members of 
our Woman's Missionary Societies and two Royal Ambassadors who 
have ceased from their earthly labors and are enjoying the Home 
over there. No doubt many garments could be shown, that they like 
Dorcas, had made for those in less fortunate circumstances and 
these stitches of love will be a reminder of their love for the Master 
as He said, "In as much as ye have done it unto one of the least of 
these, ye have done it imto Me." 

We place flowers today in memory of the following: 
Lexington First— Mrs. G. W. Miller, Mrs. C. W. Trice, Mrs. C. M. 
Wall, Sr., Mrs. M. A. Bullard. 

Thomasville First — Mrs. Avery Bowers. 

Carolina Avenue — Mrs. E. Z. Sm.ith, Sr., Mrs. G. E. Carter. 

Hollo ways— Mrs. B. R. Cross. 

Mills Home R. A. — Darrell Everett, Robert Bradshaw. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 
Mrs. N. C. Teague, Young People's Associational Leader, pre- 
siding. 

Leader's Report 

During the year 1941, 16 or our 29 churches have had a part in 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



45 



the missionary training of our young people. 

Total Number of Organizations: Y. W. A., 14; G. A., 23; R. A., 
10; Simbeams, 13. 

Total Gifts for 1941— Y. W. A., $651.37; G. A., $369.85; R. A., 
$280.47; Sunbeams, $182.87. 

Number of Tithers: Y. W. A., 34; G. A., 58; R. A., 38; Sun- 
beams, 4. 

In comparing the financial reports for the first quarter 1941 
with that of 1942 there has been an increase of $74.73 in total gifts. 
Increase of $27.00 Hundred Thousand Club. Increase of $30.83 Annie 
Armstrong Offering. 

While we see an increase in our gifts to all objects and are 
grateful, we are mindful of the fact that we have not met the En- 
listment Objective stressed by our superintendent. So this year 
we want to stress Enlistment of new members and new societies. We 
need to organize at least 8 new societies and keep alive the ones we 
now have. To accomplish this we are going to have Miss Myrtle 
Zentmeyer (State W. M. U. Field Worker) in our Association the 
last two weeks in June (15-26). She will work in our churches that 
have no young people's organizations. We plan to have our Young 
People's Rally on Sunday, June 21, while she is with us. In 1941 we 
held our Rally July 13, with Thomasville First Church — 9 churches 
were represented with an attendance of 71 young people. We hope 
to have a better one this year. 

As we stress Enlistment we also want to stress trained leaders. 
In January Mrs. Gilmer Cross (Divisional Young People's Leader) 
came and taught the young people's directors the book "Telling You 
How." Six of our directors took advantage of this study. 

In these days of stress let us not forget the words of Paul when 
he said, "Redeeming the time for the days are evil." We must carry 
on regardless of all odds. 

Attention was called to the various focus weeks, house parties, 
and camps. 

The closing inspirational address was given by Mrs. Gilmer 
Cross, Young People's Leader for Greensboro Division. Mrs. Cross, 
who had graciously left her own Associational meeting to come to 
us, presented the problem of leadership for auxiliary organizations 
as a challenge to mothers who desire the best in child training for 
their children. 

The afternoon session was closed with prayer by Mrs. L. S. 
Gaines, after which the meeting adjoiu-ned. 



46 



MINUTES OF THE 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 
ASSOCIATION 

The Liberty Baptist Sunday School Association met at Church- 
land Baptist Church, Sunday afternoon, October 5, 1941, at 2:30 
o'clock. The meeting opened with the songs, "Simply Trusting," and 
"Nearer, Still Nearer." 

The Devotional was led by Rev. N. C. Teague, who used Isaiah 
62:11 as a basis for his remarks. He closed his devotional with 
prayer. 

After the roll of churches was taken, a committee composed of 
Mr. Black from Liberty Church, Mr. Barnes from Churchland, and 
Mr. P. M. Hendricks, from Firsl Church, Lexington, was appointed to 
consider the requests for a place of meeting in January. 

Conferences were held for all department officers and teachers. 

The Nominating Committee gave the following report for offi- 
cers to serve during the coming year: 

C. F. Motsinger, Superintendent. 

Dr. W. K. McGee, Associate Superintendent in charge of Evan- 
gelism. 

Rev. T, W. Bray, Associate Superintendent to Promote Training. 
Miss Ila Hensley, Secretary. 

Group Superintendents: E. P. Woodleaf, Trinity; G. W. Miller, 
Lexington; Charles Lambeth, Denton. 
Department Superintendents: 
Cradle Roll— Mrs. C. L. Black, Thorn asville. 
Beginners— Mrs. Will Owen, Center Hill. 
Primary — Mrs. P. M. Hendricks. 
Junior — Mi^s Myra Olive, Thomasville. 
Intermediate — Mrs. John Brewer, Churchland. 
Young People — ^Miss Vessie Gillespie, Thomasville. 
A.dult — Mrs. Maskey Smith, Abbott's Creek. 
Extension— Mrs. J. V. Luther, Thomasville. 

D. V. B. S.— E. C. Roach, Erlanger. 
Chorister, L. W. Hansel. 

Pianist — Mrs. Nyal Yarbrough. 

The song "To The Work" was sung. The Place Committee re- 
ported that next meeting would be at Denton, January 4, 1942. 

Rev. N. C. Teague introduced the speaker, Miss Alda Grayson, 
who gave an inspiring message on China. 

There were 19 churches represented and 129 present. 

The meeting closed with prayer by Rev. H. B. Mitchell. 

LIBERTY SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION 

The Liberty Sunday School Association met at Denton Baptist 
Church, January 4, 1942, at 2:30 P. M. The meeting opened with 
songs led by the chorister, L. W. Hansel, "Leaning On the Ever- 
lasting Arms," and "Jesus Paid It All." 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



47 



A. L. Snider, of Denton, led the Devotional. He read Matthew 
28:19-20, and Matthew 10:14-16. 

A count of the chui'ches was taken and it revealed that there 
were 15 churches represented with 86 present. 

There was a discussion of the Associational Sunday school Re- 
vival to be directed by the State Workers the week of July 5. 

An announcement was made that the Sunday School Department 
of the State Convention would sponsor a meeting of all officers 
pf the Sunday School of the Association in the First Baptist Church, 
Lexington, March 6, and it was voted that this take the place of the 
April meeting. 

After a brief discussion of the work of each department, by the 
Association Superintendents, Rev. B. A. Mitchell brought the mes- 
sage for the afternoon. The Scripture used was Matt. 7:24-27. 
The subject for discussion v/as: "Our Sunday School and Its Or- 
ganization Meeting the Needs of Our Times." He said there are 
three rocks on which we build: 1 — Solid rock of an unfailing faith 
in god; 2— Rock of Reverence for and Dependence upon God; 3— 
Rock of Unselfishness. CHRIST IS THE FOUNDATION. 

Rev. L. S. Gaines dismissed with prayer. 

LIBERTY SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION 

The Liberty Baptist Sunday School Association met at the First 
Baptist Church, Lexington, March 6, 1942. This was one of a series 
of Conferences being held over the State by the Sunday School 
Division of the Baptist State Convention. Mrs. John B. Lane pre- 
sided over the meeting. 

At 5 o'clock, there was a meeting of the general officers of the 
Association, pastors and superintendents of the Sunday Schools. 
The meeting opened with the song, "Near the Cross." The Devo- 
tional period was given to the sharing of favorite and helpful verses 
of Scripture. Rev. T. W. Bray led the prayer. 

Mr. Motsinger, Superintendent, took charge of the meeting for 
the transaction of some matters of business. It was decided to hold 
the next quarterly meeting at Rich Fork Baptist Church June 28, 
instead of the first Sunday in July, so that plans could be completed 
for the Sunday School Revival that will be directed by the State 
Sunday School Workers, July 5-10. 

Mrs. John B. Lane discussed the goals for State and Associational 
Work. 

At 6 o'clock, the ladies of the First Baptist Church served supper 
to all present. 

At 9 o'clock, Rev. Douglas Branch, Evangelist in Piedmont North 
Carolina, under the State Mission Board, brought a very inspiring 
message on "Discipleship." 

Goals for the Association were adopted. 

A roll of the churches was taken and it was found that there 
were 17 churches represented, with 128 present. 

John B. Lane gave a helpful discussion on the Standards for the 
Simday School. 



48 



MINUTES OF THE 



Mrs. Lane brought the closing message and the meeting closed 
with prayer by I. G. Greer. 

ILA HENSLEY, Secretary. 

MINUTES OF ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. MEETING 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its first quar- 
terly meeting of the year on November 30, 1941, wtih the Jersey 
Church. 

The Devotional, "Christian Courage In B. T. U.," was conducted 
by Mr. Elms Woodleaf. 

Special music was rendered by Mr. and Mrs. Carey Davis. 

The attendance banner was won by the Liberty Training Union 
with 41% present. 

A report was made on the Associational meeting held in Thomas- 
ville on November 24, 

The motion was made and carried that we buy an efficiency 
banner to be presented each quarter to the union doing the best work. 

The Place Committee reported Stoners Grove as the place of 
next meeting. 

All officers, old and new, were introduced and recognized by the 
Association. 

The Inspirational message was brought by Mr. Waldo C. Cheek, 
of Asheboro. 

Closing prayer was led by H. M. Stroup. 

MISS WILMATEEN MORRIS, Secretary. 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its second quar- 
terly meeting of the year with the Stoners Grove Baptist church 
on March 29, 1942. 

Miss Mozelle Clinard led the Devotional, her subject being 
"Purity in Personal Life." The attendance banner was won by the 
Liberty Union with 77% present. 

The Place Committee reported Denton as the place of next meet- 
ing to be on May 31, 1942. A report was given on the regional meet- 
ing at Leaksviiie by an Intermediate boy from Rich Fork Church. 
The Inspirational meeting of the evening was brought by Mr. Smith 
Hegleman of the Baptist Hospital in Winston -Salem. 

MRS. JAMES C. KEARNS, Secretary. 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its third quar- 
terly meeting of the year with the Denton Baptist Church on May 
31, 1942. Mr. Wilbur Lewis presiding. The Devotional was led by 
Miss Dorcus Clinard. Miss Texie Sowers gave a Digest of B. T. U. 
Standard. The attendance banner was presented to the Denton 
Union, which had 55% present. 

The Place Committee reported Erlanger as the place of next 
meeting, on August 30. Departmental conferences were conducted 
by the Associational leaders. Hymn singing was conducted by 
Mr. Claude Cook. Inspirational message was delivered by Mr. Lucius 
R. Evans, Fifth Regional Director. 

MRS. JAMES C. KEARNS, Secretary. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



49 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call Since 
Our Last Session 



**In My Father's House Are Many Mansions, I 
Go to Prepare a Place For You." — John 14-2 



ABBOTTS CREEK— Mr. W. S. Hayworth, Sr., Mr. J. L. 
Weinick, Mrs, Mary Ann Bodenheimer. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. E. Z. Smythe. 

CHURCHLAND— Mr. D. R. Swicegood. 

ER-LANGER^Mr. G. B. Bland. 

HOLLOW AYS— Mr. J. F. H. Daniel, Deacon B. R. Cross, Mrs. 
B. R. Cross, Mr. S. O. Briggs. 

JERSEY— Mr. A. G. Lemley. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. M. A. Bullard, Mrs. W. H. Collins, Mrs. 
G. L. Cope, Mrs. C. H. Gobble, Mrs. Elizabeth Parker, 
Mr. J. H. Rogers, Mr. T. S. Wall, Sr., Mrs. Lila Webster 
Ross, Mrs. A. L. Yarbrough, Mr. George Yarbrough. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. J. A. Hepler, Miss Omie Easter. 

MILLS HOME— Master Robert Bradshaw. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW— Mr. Carlie P. Carrick. 

REEDS— Mr. D. S. Carter. 

RICH FORK— Mrs. Minnie Leonard, Mrs. Jane Eddinger. 

SHEETS MEM^ORIALr— Mr. Hoyt Williams, Mr. J. E. Aber- 

nathy, Mr. John Gallimore. 

SMITH GROVE— Mrs. Mollie Smith, Mr. Mock Clement. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Etta Basinger, Mrs. Nellie Hicks. 

STONERS GROVE^Mr. C. H. Beck, Mr. Otha Wafford, 

SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. Annis Doby, Mrs. Roxie Bean, Mrs. 
Roxie Daniel. 

THOMASVILLE— Mr. C. S. Saunders, Mrs. Z. T. Bell, Mrs. W. 
L. Aderholt. 

WALLBURG— Mrs. Ruth Wall Russell, Mrs. Martha Reece. 
WALTERS GROVE— Mr. Fred Byerly, Mr. Tommy Byerly. 

REV. S. G. SNYDER, JOHN P. JARRETT, 
MRS. C. M. HOWELL, VESSIE GILLESPIE, 
MRS. R. G. JENNINGS, Committee On 

Obituaries. 



50 



MINUTES OF THE 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Name 



Address 



Church 



Work 



Bray, T. W. 
Caldwell, R. N. 
Combs, J. A. 
Cox, J. A. 
Digh, D. W. 
Edding-er, C. C. 
Gaines, Louis S. 
Galiimore, Arthur 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Hunt, Howard 
Jarrett, J. F. 
Lanning-, H, Otis 
Mathews, L. J. 
Mitchell, B. A. 
Mumford, E. F. 
McGee, W. K. 
McMillan, J. A. 
Neilson, J. A. 
Newton. J. D. 
Pickler, C. L. 
Reid, C. B. 
Roach, E, C 
Snider, S. D. 
Stroup, H, M. 
Teag-ue, N. C. 
Williamson, W. D 
Young, C. S. 



Thomasville, N, C. 
Troy, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C., R. : 
Thomasville, Box 345 
Salisbury, N. C., R. 5 
Welcome, N. C 
Lexington, N C. 
Wake Forest, N. C. 
China Grove, N. C, 
Denton, N. C. 
Linwood, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
W-Salem, N C., R. 5 
Kernersv'e, N. C. ,R. 
High Point, N. C, R. 
Thomasville, N. C, 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Albemarle, N. C. 
New London, N. C. 
Erlanger, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Denton, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C„ R. ; 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Lexington, N C. 



Rich Fork 
Taylors Grove 
Reeds 

Carolina Ave. 
Center Hill 
Welcome 
Lexington 
Lexington 
Walters Grove 
Pleasant Plains 
Center Hill 
Reid Sti-eet 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
Mills Home 
Mills Home 
Thomasville 
Summerville 
Taylors Grove 
Erlanger 
Southside 
Denton 
Reeds 

Lick Creek 
Sheets Memorial 



Pastor 

Inactive 

Inactive 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Missionary 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Teacher 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Retired 

Pastor 

Editor 

Pastor 

Retired 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 



ASSISTANTS TO PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 



Name 


Address 


Church 


Work 


Hensley, Miss Ha 
Gillespie, Miss Vessie 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Church Secretary 
Church Secretary 



MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 
None 



PRESIDENTS OF 



LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 
None 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 51 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

CHURCHES Name and Address 

Abbotts Creek Carey J. Davis, High Point, N. C, R. 2 

Carolina Avenue Willie Gilliam, Box 26, Thomasville 

Center Hill None 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Kesler, Lexington, R. 5 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton 

Erlanger Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger 

Floyd Mrs. Dallie Mae Floyd, Lexington, R. 6 

Holloways G. C. Palmer, Lexington, R. 6 

Jersey R. L. Palmer, Lin wood 

Lexington Mrs. T. B. Spencer, Lexington 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, R. 2 

Lick Creek Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, High Rock 

Mills Home W. B. Lord, Thomasville 

Mountain View None 

New Friendship Robert Hartman, Winston- Salem, R. 5 

Oak Hill Memorial J. C. Creed, Thomasville, R. 1 

Pleasant Plains Howard Hunt, Denton 

Reeds E. G. Fritts, Lexington, R. 3 

Rich Fork Wilbur Lewis, High Point, R. 2 

Reid Street J. A. Martin, Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Mrs. John Craven, Lexington 

Smith Grove Mrs. Alma Lassiter, Linwood, R. 1 

Southside Lelon Rule, Thomasville 

Stoners Grove Mrs. Ruth Miller, Southmont 

Summerville Mrs. Emma Carrick, Denton 

Thomasville Mrs. Alva Boyles, Thomasville 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Ray Owen, New London, R. 2 

Wallburg Claude Cook, Winston-Salem, R. 5 

Walters Grove Miss Mamie Lee Gallimore, Lexington, R. 2 

Welcome E. L. Davis, Welcome 



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Erasures 



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Revival Meetings 
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State Baptist Paper 



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i-12 Years 



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13-16 Years 



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Young- People 
17 - 24 Years 



Adults 

25 Years and Up 



1 to to CO i-K 



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Extension Dept. 



Departmental Officers 



00000000000000000000000000000000 



Have You a Mission 
Sunday School? 



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Total Enrollment of 
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What Is Your 
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Baotisms From 
Sunday School 



Is the School 
Graded? 



(D O 



0000 



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Is It standard A-1? 



Teacli'rs with Diplomas 



Enrollment of 
Vacation School 



Ayerag-e Attendance 
Of Vacation School 



l^ot^^^ol^5t^5^o^5t^5t^^t^st^5Ml-'^-'l-l^-' 
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Adult Unions 



Young People's Unions! 



Intermiediate Unions 



Junior Unions 



Story Hours 



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Total Unions and 
Story Hours 



to to to 00 



Adults Enrolled 



Young- People Enrolled 



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Intermediates Enrolled 



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Story Hours Enrolled 



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Total Enrolled Unions 
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Total Number Daily 
Bible Readers 



Number Taking 
Study Course 



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Total Systematic 
GJivers of All Unions 



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Has Training Union 
Been A-1 for 1 Quarter? 



Number of Unions A-1 
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No. College Students 



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No Church in Association has a Brotherhood 



M 

3 

O h3 

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Number of Woman's 
Missionary Societies 



Number 


of 


Y.W.A.'s 


Number 


of 


G.A.'s 


Number 


of 


R.A.'s 


Number 


of 


Sunbeams 



Total W.M.U. 
Org-anizations 



W.M.S. Members 



Y.W.A's Members 



G.A.'s Members 



R.A.'s Members 



Sunbeam Members 



Total Members Enrolled 



Total Enrolled in 
Mission Study Courses 



Contributions (Local 
Work) Given by W.M.U, 



Contributions (Mis- 
sions) Given by W.M.U. 



No. Brotherhoods 




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Does Your Church Own 
Its House of Worship? 



i CJ5 CO 



When Was It Built? 




iaiiiiiig riiii iiii iiiiiiiiilii 



Persons Seated 



o to o co: 



as 00 CT ^^ ( 



Number of Rooms 



Dep't Assembly Riooi 



I-' No. Separate Class Rms 



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Value of Church House 
and Grounds 



21 



1 

I o to io ^5 w CO cop o Kjy? h-' ^5_^ as o co o oi co oi 

liiliiiiSiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiii 



i 



Value of Pastor's Home 



^ O O Ci ^ 



Total Value 

All Church Property 



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Indebtedness on All 
Church Property 



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Insurance Carried 



Parsonag-es 




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Q o < 

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to 



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^ o 
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I "o O O O OO Vl O '-J O O "o O O OO *o 'tN3 Vi O *0 O O _ - 



Pastor's Salary- 
Paid This Year 



other Salaries 



-J OS O Cn U1 O O cri rf^ Ui O U1 o '^^ .'^ o 

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F-^ o o oOyiocnooooi oocni-'oajcn^oo-j tn j-^ iss ^ o 



Ministerial Help 
and Supply 



M to 
1-1 00 INSOIOICO bO^ 

tni_i<35_joiooocjii-i[oooa5 
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t>OC005Ci'<IlN500ob5-3hP. 



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© M OS I 
h-i to I 



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CO 41- ~a 05 Cn OS to Ol O to h-i CO 

cocoH-irfi-totsscoKf^oooaiff^o 



Building & Repairs 
Spent this Year 



Church Debt 
and Interest 



Incidentals 



03 

h 

QD 1-1 cn 



00 



1-1 CO h-1 1-1 h-i 

---qOS 4a.OO-qOi>*>->f^O 
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. CO -J CD 



>f^l_i l-ii-i^-'i-'^-^tO 
Co^CTloCn|_i>*^to'^0=^0 
rf^ 00 J-J to CO o «^ . .°° 5^ 
05 CO OS V-i O 'tn ^ OO o 

^ 00 00 CO rf^ CO 4^^CCi^Cf1 



Literature for 
Sunday School & 
B Y.P.U. & W.M.S. 



CO I 



to , 



Help Given to 
Local Poor 



to 1-1 . 

'a>o^-^coco^^i.co-qcoc^^^_l^500MCJ^to^cna5a5: 

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loo o O O O O O O ^oOiOOJ-J,— '-^ 




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cn 'cn o o °° "o 

o o o o_^l o 



►f^ h-l 1-1 I 
cn t*- O °° < 
00 OJ ?° -J 5^ I 
CO CO '(^ hl^ < 
OS )-i_tO I 



For Printing- the 
Minutes and Clerk 
of Association 



other Objects 



CO to I 



hpk to CT> tOH-ih-'Mi^tO 

tA -J^cnoo cna5C5CDtocobooo(-ioocOhP>.i-ii-iaito05Cn cjs'cocooo^^o 
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.00, 



Total for Local 
p-urposes Given by 
Church and All 
Its Organizations 



H-icntotn: o to: f-'oco»i^: toco 
ihi^ocno; tootocn: ctioocti: -jo 
'Oooo; tnooo: '^ooo: en o 



Pledged to Cooper- 
ative Program 



Number of Tithers 



Ct> & P 



3 M 

I 



o 



o e 



Off ^ ■ 



O 



I 05 Cl tf>. CO Iss 

1 S^s c: 
' Z n->s 



Hi 



^ =- O 

^ CO 

SU 2 M - 
S r ^. << 



FOR LIST OP TREASURERS AND POSTOFFICES, 
SEE TABLE VI 



REGULAR 
TREASURERS 
AND POST OFFICES 



oi CO : 
(_i CO : 

tPi, o I-' : 
o o •<!: 



c^ en ^ oi o o 
o_2.o cn tn o o 



00 I-*: 



CO o : 
w o rf^: 



^ o 



: CO o °? OS OS 00 



: I-' to 

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y-^Oitt^: 00 05 CO ?° ^ c;i CO «o 

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«c> cn o tn; 
to OS o 0°: 



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O O CO CO o 



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"to w o CO o'l 

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M INS to CO 
CO OS OS F-i -J 

CO o cn ^ CO 'h-i 
cn o ~3 h-' 00 CO 



OS OS 

OS OS 



Total to 

Co-operative Program 



Special to Associational 
Missions 



Special to State 
Missions 



Special to Home 
Missions 



Special to Foreign 
Missions 



Special to Schools 
and Colleges 



Special To 

Theological Seminaries 



M -J to 
to to W1 i_i 

io o ^ ^ 

h-* o OS to 



(-a I-' CO CO M 

to oo to OS -J CO 4^ 00 to °° CO -q t-' 00 cn 
coocnoocoto«r>rf>.*'coo5'ioeoPp5oo 
OS OS o o OS o ol-'o^oio'y^I-'J-iobscn 
cn cn OOP o o o CO to o o o to_oc£j--i 



tOtOM I- 

i-i OS CO tn o CO 
o cn -g to 00 ~a 
OS U OS tn 

CO OS Oj:i CO OS 



Special to Orphanage 



>t^tO (-i^a: CO rf^ CO M ^ i_i 00 

rf>.tn|_icocno: cncooseO|^^jfi.cop^^___^^^^_^_ 

to o o: toW oboo'^•<'ot^oo<='^-^Wlo!--'0°!-''~' o cn 
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to I ■ 

; OT; o: -j: 



) i>o to M tn to w to cn 

_, OOCO|^>*>.4».(_'COO(f». 

> ?^ o b o ^ CO o 



Special to Hospitals 



CO 




Special to Old 
Ministers' Relief 



to -J cn OS 

CO o o 00 CO 



O O Id 

o o cn 



_o o tn 



Hundred Thousand 
Club 



o 
>: CO 



Other Objects 



1 CO CO -q 

1 M cn -q 
' to CO to 00 



MO tn M 



1 cn cn cn -J 1^ cn to M 

' cn OS h-" CO ^ CO 4i. 

iCO|_itOh-'tOol— 'rf>-CO 



Total for Missions 
and Benevolences 
Given by the Church 
and All Departments 



OS CO -J ' 

CO to cn ■ 
■ cn M o -a I 



I to cn tn M < 
I cn CO -3 ( 
■ o to OS -a < 



I CO 

I h-i -5 O 

1 -5 cn bo 



CO 00 00 
CO M 00 

~a to CO 



h-1 h_i CO to M to CO CO 
tOM to OS tji-b 

cncnoocntooocn.-j 
Moooh-ioscntnh-'h-' 



; cn CO -g -3 I 



Grand Total 
All Purposes 
Given Last Year 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 59 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr. 



1832 
183S 
1834 
3835 
1836 
183; 
1838 
1830 
184C 
1841 
1842 
1^4^: 

iSli; 

1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
18 49 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1835 
1866 
3S67 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1878 
1877 
187S 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
18S< 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1891 
1S92 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



V/HERE HELD 



IJamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creels 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

SBig- Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
Hollowaj's 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3B:g- Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. To!)ey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
FI. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. P\ Re id 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J,,..K Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. TurTi.er 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



CLEP.K 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
A^zariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
He'nry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



60 



MINUTES OP THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr WHERE HELD 



Jersey 

2Pine Meeting- H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wallburg' 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanag-e 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Plill 
Wallburg' 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
Mills Home 
Reeds 
Churchland 
Denton 
Wallburg 
Center Hill 
New Friendship 
Liberty 

Abbotts Creek 



PREACHER 



W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. D. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 

0. A. Keller 

1. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 

G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 

J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 

H. M. Stroupe 
L. S. Gaines 
N. C. Teague 

I G. Greer 

Dr. R. A. Herring 



MODERATOR 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith , 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G, Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 

G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
G. W. Miller 

R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 

H. M. Stroup 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 

Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



nun 

Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
19^3 



One Hundred and Eleventh Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 
September 7fh and 8fli, 1943 



The next Session will be held September 54]i and 6rfi; 1944 
with the First Baptist Church, Thomasville, N. C. 



These Minutes Are Dedicated 
to the 

Memory of Rev. S. G. Snider, 
Who Died During the Associational Year 
and While He Was Pastor of the 
Southside Church 



INDEX 



Addresses 15-19-24-28 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 43 

Auxiliaries — Associational 4 

Auxiliary Minutes 35 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

Biblical Recorder Representative » 22 

Church Clerks 50 

Church Treasurers 51 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3 

Executive 3 

Appointed by the Moderator 12 

Program 24 

Standing 4 

Constitution and By-Laws 6 

Deceased Members 41 

Directories: Associational 3 

Church 43 

Ordained Ministers 43 

Choir 42 

Election of Officers 22 

Floyd Church Admitted 19 

Historical Table 44-45 

Messengers 4 

Minutes Dedicated 34 

New Pastors 13 

Officers 3 

Order of Business 9 

Orphanage Representative 22 

Pastors of Association 46 

Proceedings Associational 9 

Reports: American Bible Society 26 

Committee on Obituaries 34 

B. T. U 31-48 

Committee on Election of Officers 22 

Committee on Resolutions 34 

Committee on Nomination of Reporters 33 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 33 

Committee on Finance 23 

Digest of Church Letters 20 

Foreign Missions 17 

Home Missions 16 

Hospitals 11 

Education 14 

Mills Home 25 

Ministerial Reliefs 31 

Public Morals 27 

State Missions 15 

Sunday Schools 23 

Treasurers 23 

W. M. U. Work 29 

Resolution 22 

Standing 7 

Sunday School Associational Meetings 40 

Statistical Tables 46-52 

Sermon, Annual .13 

Sunday School Superintendents 47 

Visitors 14 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, Moderator Denton, N. C. 

Dan S. Hayworth, Vice Moderator ." High Point, N. C, R. 2 

Albert L. Snider, Clerk and Treasurer Denton, N. C. 

PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Nam© Cliiiroh and Address 

Rev. Louis S. Gaines, Chairman Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek, High Point, R. 2 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill, Lexington, R. 6 

L. E. Rickard Churchland, Linwood, R. 1 

p,. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue, Thomasville 

A. L. Snider Denton, Denton, N. C. 

E. C, Haynes Erlanger, Erlanger 

G. C. Palmer HoUoways, Lexington, R. 6 

H. L. Palmer Jersey, Linwood, R. 1 

C. M. Wall, Sr. Lexington, Lexington 

O. P. Hughes Liberty, Thomasville, R. 2 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek, High Rock 

C. P. Motsinger New Friendship, Winston- Salem, R. 5 

I. G. Greer Mills Home, Thomasville 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View, Lexington, R. 6 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial, Thomasville, R. 2 

F. M. Smith Pleasant Plains, Denton 

J. C. Leonard Reeds, Lexington, R. 3 

Millard Wilson Reid Street, 206 Greene Ave., Thomasville 

Willie Bowers Rock Pork, Thomasville, R. 1 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial, Lexington 

G. E. Morefield Smith Grove, Salisbury, R. 4 

L. E. Lookabill Stoner's Grove, Southmont 

Edd Epps Southside, Thomasville 

L. C. Carrick Simimerville, Denton, R. 1 

S. R. Laws Thomasville, Thomasville 

Add Cranford Taylors Grove, New London 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg, Wallburg 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove, Lexington, R. 2 

M. L. Craver Welcome, Welcome 

D. L. Owens Floyd, Lexington, N. C, R. 6 

The Moderator, Clerk and all Paistons of the Association being 
Ex Officio Members. (See Pa®e 13 of 1933 Minutes.) 

ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. H. M. Stroup Denton, N. C. 

Albert L. Snider Denton, N, C. 

Rev. Louis S. Gaines Lexington, N. C. 

Rev. N. C. Teague Lexington, N. C, R. 3 

C. V. Teague Wallburg, N. C. 

Rev. L. J. Matthews Winston-Salem, N. C, R. 5 

Rev. B. A. Mitchell Kernersville, N. C, R. 1 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY. OR OTHER PAID EMPLOYEES. 

None. 



4 



MINUTES OF THE 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

None. 

ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
W. M. U. CONVENTION 

Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Supt Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. C. C. Coppedge, Secy, and Treas Thbmasville, N. C. 

Miss Beatrice Council, Young People's Director .... Thomasville, N. C. 
Annual Meeting was held April 26, 1943. See page 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

C. F. Motsinger, General Supt Winston -Salem, N. C, R. 5 

Mrs. Ida C. Nading. Secretary Lexington Road, Winston-Salem 

Meetings were held January 10 and April 2, 1943. See Page 

B. T. U. CONVENTION 

Miss Ruby Batten, Secretary Thomasville, N. C. 

Wilbur Lewis, President High Point, N. C, R. 2 

No report of any meeting being held. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF THE BROTHERHOOD 

None. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS 
OF THE ASSOCIATION 
The Mills Home, Thjomasville, N. C. 



I. G. Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

B. W. Spillman, Chairman Committee Kinston, N. C. 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 

OFFICERS BAPTIST SCHOOLS STATE BOARDS 
AND INSTITUTIONS 

Residinig Witliim the Association 

L. A. Martin, Trustee, Meredith College Lexington, N. C. 

Louis S. Gaines, Member General Board Lexington, N. C. 

Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

W. K. McGee, Trustee Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Trustee Mars Hill College Lexington, N. C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. McMillan, Trustee Wake Forest College Thomasville, N. C. 

C. C. Wall, Trustee Mills Home Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. Neilson, Member Greneral Board Thomasville, N. C. 

W. K. McGee, Director Biblical Recorder, Inc Thomasville, N. C. 



MESSENGERS 
ABBOTTS CREEK— Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Hayworth, Mrs. W. A. Mot- 
singer, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hayworth, Mrs. Sanford Hayworth, 
Daisy Spurgeon, Mrs. Burch Moore, Rev. and Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Delia Davis, Rev. E. F. Mumford, W. P. Davis, Carey J. 
Davis, Miss Minnie Hayworth, Mrs. Laura Moore, Clarence 
Moore, H. M. Garrison. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Rev. J. A. Cox, Mrs. J. J. Carrick, Mrs. H. D. 

Bradshaw, Virgie Gallimore, Patty McCaskill. 
CENTER HILL— Troy Jarrett, Mrs. Nyal Yarbrough, Miss Elizabeth 

Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Beck, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Hunt, Jacie 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



Jarrett, S. E. Jarrett, D. O. Jarrett, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Jarrett. 

CHURCHLAND— Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Rickard, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn 
Barnes, Lena Rickard, Mrs. Inez Rickard, Mrs. Graham Barnes, 
Margaret Grubta, Mrs. R. G. Snider, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Wilson. 

DENTON— iRev. and Mrs. H. M. Stroup, A. L. Snider, Mrs. A. L. 
Plummer, Mrs. Will Harris, Mrs. O. D. Carroll, W. H. Snider, 
Mrs. W. H. Snider, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Wall, W. R. Snider 

ERLANGER— Rev. C. B. Atkinson, V. V. Everhart, Miss Sallie Lou 
Everhart, Mrs. J. B. Powell. 

FLOYD — Mrs. A. L. Floyd, Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Owens, Frank Shipton, 

HOLLOWAYS— Geo. C. Workman, W. H. Johnson, Mrs. Hugh Palmer, 
Mrs. S. O. Briggs, Mrs. Paul Palmer, John F. Palmer. 

JERSEY— Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Tate, Mrs. J. H. Cope, Rev. C. C. Ed- 
dinger, Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Helen Tate, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Sharpe, 
C. L. Coppley, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Roach. 

LEXINGTON— Sam J. Smith, J. D. Redwine, Rev. and Mrs. Gaines, 
Mrs. Sam Miller, Miss Roxie Sheets, H. C. Myers, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. L. Tate, Mi'S. Irene L. Justice, Mrs. W. A. Smith, C. M. Wall, 
Sr., Mrs. W. J. Lancaster, Mrs. O. K. Sharpe, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Miller, Mrs. F. C. Sowers, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Lee, Dorcas Gaines, 
Miss Betty Ann Sharpe, Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Woodleaf, Ruth 
Woodleaf, Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Miss Ila Hensley, Miss Bettie Goss, 
Betty Ann Eames, Mrs. A. L. Pickard, Mrs. Spaugh Thomason, 
Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Miss OUie Mendenhall, Mrs. K. S. Tate, Mrs. 
C. R. Sharpe, Mrs. Sam Miller, Mrs. John Sink, Mrs. E. L. Mor- 
gan, H. L. Banks, Mi^s Addie Davis, Mrs. Fred C. Sowers, Mrs. 

H. W. Hinshaw, Mrs. C. C. Wall, Mrs, I. S. Hutchins, Miss Eliza- 
beth Sneed, Mrs. T. S. Cross, Leroy A. Caudle, A. L. Pickard, 
C. C. Wall, L. A. Martin, Mrs. Sam J. Smith, Mrs. Guy Thomas, 
Dr. F. G. Johnson. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. Nova Dennis, Ruth Kennedy, Hope and W. W. 
Whitaker, Mrs. Leana Buie, Mrs. L. V. Miller, Kenneth Miller, 
Mrs. F. F. Lopp, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Hannah Hepler, 
Therman Buie, Doris Lopp, Mrs. Clarence Kindley, Mr. and Mrs. 
E. T. Kennedy, Mrs. Haywood Lambeth, Lee Vickers. 

LICK CREEK— W. A. Jarvis, Henry McDonald, Paul Feezor, Mrs. 
Z. L. Morgan, John C. Reid, Mrs. A. L. Bean, Mrs. Henry Mc- 
Donald, Polly Feezor. 

MILLS HOME— Rev. J. A. McMillan, Mr. and Mrs. McCoin, Mr. and 

I. G. Greer, Miss Daughtry, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, John Chandler, 
Miss Hedgecock, Rev. J. A. NeUson, Miss Sallie McCracken, 
Beatrice Council, Miss Viola Hester, Mrs. Skaggs, Mr. and Mrs. 
C. C. McCoin. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW— Mrs. J. O. Carrick, Mrs. Earlie Carrick, Julia 

Carrick, Pauline Briggs, Essie Parker, Shirley Carrick, Lucy Mae 

Carrick, J. L. Carrick, Louise Floyd. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Rev. and Mrs. L. J. Matthews, Mrs. George 

Nading, C. F. Motsinger, Mrs. Farris Swaim, Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, 

Mrs. L. H. Wilson. 
OAK HILL MEMORIAL— Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Lambeth, Mrs. Raymond 

Underwood, K. C. Lambeth, Walter Mathis, Mrs. Carl Trotter, 

Mrs. I. C. Beck. 

PLEASANT PLAINS— Mrs. Camie Hinson, Marie Hulin, Adline Poole, 

Rev. and Mrs. H. T. Himt. 
REEDS— Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Craver, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, Mrs. H. M. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



Meachum, Mrs. R. A. Hill, Mrs. A. R. Graver, Rev. N. C. Teague, 

Mrs. Alda Graver, Mr and Mrs. D. J. Crews, Mrs. N. C. Teague. 
ABBOTTS CREEK— Mr. and Mrs. John Spurgeon, Ruth Spurgeon, 

Clyde Spurgeon, Grace Hayworth. 
REID STBEET^Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Renegar, Mr. and Mrs. J. V. 

Luther. 

RICH FORK— T. H. Small, Mrs. T. H. Small, Rev. and Mrs. T. W. 

Bray and Blllie Bray, Mrs. J. Canoy, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Myers, 

Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Mrs. D. W. Clinard, Mrs. Conrad Myers, 

Mrs. Sallie Orender. 
SHEETS MEMORIAI^Odis Frank, Mrs. Z. V. Fullbright, J. H. Guf- 

fy, J. W. Byars, Mrs. J. H. Guffy, G. R. Bean, Mrs. T. J. Peters, 

Rev. Chas. S. Young, Mrs. Oscar Beck. 
SMITH GROVE— Gusta Orrell, G. E. Morefield, Mrs. Ray Orrell. 
SOUTHSIDE— Ada Scarlett, Rev. Thomas B. Flow, Mrs. Julia Beck. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Jimmie Fry, Hugh Wafford, A. A. Graves. 
SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. Will Davis, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Carrick, Mrs. 

Olin Davis, Miss Nona Daniel, Walter Bean, Gladys Carrick, Mrs. 

R. E. Carrick. 
TAYLORS GROVE- 
THOMAS VILLE^L. E. Teague, J. Roy Proctor, Mrs. W. O. Poole, 

Mrs. G. M. Howell, Rev. F. A. Maier, Mrs. R. G, Jennings, Mrs. 

Beamer H. Barnes, Rev. J. D. Newton, S. B. Laws, Dr. W. K. 

McGee, Mrs. M. L. Howard, Mrs. W. K. McGee. 
WALLBURG— J. W. Tuttle, Maskey M. Smith, W. P. Green. 
WALTERS GROVE— Eva Hill, Mr, and Mrs. Everett G. Pierce, Mrs. 

Carl Gallimore, Mrs. E. L. Pierce. 
WELCOME— E. S. Graver, M. L. Graver, Mrs. W. W. Brinkley. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

(See Page 14, 1929 Minutes) 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECIT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish 
the Gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
Association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 
MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the 
Association, pastors, of the churches of the Association, and messen- 
gers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 

thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, 
vice -moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the Association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organi- 
zations, or as defined by the Association from time to time. 

BOARD AND COIMMITTEES 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the Association, and to attend to all business 
in the Association between the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the Associaiton. The 
Association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 
Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this Association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the 
Association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the Association by a two-thirds vote of the nimiber present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 
(See page 14 of Minutes of 1929.) 



STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

ORDINATION OF NEW MINISTERS 

As Recommended By Executive Promotion Committee And Adopted 
By The Association 

(See page 27 of 1939 Minutes.) 

1 — ^^That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for 
examination and approval for ordination to the full work of the 
Gospel Ministry, an Examining Council be summoned by written 
invitation of at least one week in advance from the church nominat- 
ing the candidate, the Council to include the pastor and one member- 
at-large from each Baptist Church in the fellowship of the Associa- 
tion. 

2 — ^That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly 
in the auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announce- 
ment given in good time so that all the brethren who wish to do so 

may attend the examination. 

3— That we ordain only those who have received definite call 
to become pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its 
Association, which church shall have requested his ordination. 

ORGANIZATION AND ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES 
It is recommended that any group of Individuals desiring to 
organize themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking 
the recognition of and the fellowship and cooperation with this 
Association, be requested to fulfill the following requirements: 

1 — Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of 
the desire to organize a church before any such organization takes 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



place. The moderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Com- 
mittee to study and pass upon the need of and the practicability 
for such an organization. 

2 — ^The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so 
as not to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of 
the churches already affiliated with this Association. This will be 
determined by the Promotion Executive Committee. 

3 — Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee 
the group will then request a council to examine the church covenant 
and the articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended 
that this council consist of three pastors and three laymen of the 
Association appointed by the Moderator. Should this council approve 
the covenant and articles of faith, the group will then proceed to be 
constituted into a Baptist Church of the same faith and order. 

4 — The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, 
may at the next annual Association present a letter to the Association 
asking for recognition and seeking fellowship with the Association, 
including with this letter a copy of the articles of Faith and the 
church covenant adopted by the body, as well as a report of the work 
since time of organization as it regards all phases of our Baptist 
Program of Missions, Evangelism, Education, Social Service, Training 
and Worship. 

5 — The previously appointed council of three pastors and three 
laymen will examine the letter and reports of the newly organized 
church, and will recommend to the Association its acceptance or 
rejection as the case may be. 

(See Minutes of 1941, Page 20.) 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO PROGRAM COIVIMITTEE 

The following resolution was offered and adopted: 
That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the 
Association, pastors of the entertaining churches and three persons, 
named by the Moderator during the session of the Association. 
(See page 31, 1941 Minutes.) 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO MESSENGERS 
Rev. W. K. McGee offered a resolution as follows, which was 
adopted: 

That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include; 
only those actually attending the Association from the delegations 
elected by the churches. 

(See Page 31 of 1941 Minutes.) 

ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMHTTEE 

(The following was adopted at the 1942 session. See page 38 of 
1942 Minutes.) 

Your committee recommends that: 

An executive committee of the Association be formed of seven 
members, including the Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the 
chairman of the executive-promotion committee, and four other 
members elected by the Association along with the other officers 
of the Association; the committee to attend to associational business 
between the annual meetings, their actions to be reported to and 
reviewed by the Association annually. (This executive committee 
will transact associational business; the promotion -executive com- 
mittee will promote the interests of the Association and co-operative 
program as formerly.) 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



PROCEEDINGS 

OP THE 

ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 
SEPTEMBER 7th and 8th 1943 



TUESDAY 
Morning Session September 7th, 1943 

1. On Tuesday, September 7th, at 9:45 A. M. The 
Liberty Baptist Association assembled in its One Hun- 
dred and Eleventh Annual Session with the first Bap- 
tist Church, Lexington, N. C. 

2. Rev. H. M. Stroup, the Moderator, called the 
Body to order for the transaction of business. 

3. The Opening Devotional was conducted by Rev. 
T. W. Bray, pastor of the Rich Fork church. The song 
service being led by Mr. Carey Davis, Director of As- 
sociational Music. The song used being "All Hail The 
Power of Jesus' Name." 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

4. Sam J. Smith, read the Report of the Program 
Committee; the report was adopted, subject to any 
changes deemed advisable as the meeting proceeds. 

The program adopted follows: 



TUESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotional Rev. T. W. Bray 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Mr. Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Christian Literature Dr. W. K. McGee 

10:40 Baptist Hospitals Mr. D. S. Hayworth 

11:15 Roll Call— Appointment of Committees 

11:40 Sermon Rev. B. A. Mitchell 

12:30 Recess 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:45 Devotional Rev. C. B. Atkinson 



10 



MI NUTES OP THE 



2:00 Report on Sunday Schools 
2:15 Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions 

2. Home Missions 

3. Foreign Missions 

2:35 Address 

3:25 State of Churches 

1. Digest of Letters 

2. Goals 
4:00 Adjourn 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 



9:45 Devotional Rev. D. W. Digh 

10:00 Election of Officers— Business 

10:20 Christian Education Rev. J. A. McMillan 

11:00 Orphanage Mr. C. C. Wall 

11:35 Americain Bible Society Miss Sallie McCracken 

12:00 Public Morals and Law Enforcement Rev. N. C. Teague 

1 :00 Recess 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:00 Devotional Rev. J. A. Neilson 

2:15 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 

2:45 Ministerial Relief Mr. G. W. Miller 

3:15 Report on B. T. U Mrs. Beamer Barnes 

3:30 Report of Committees 

3:45 Adjournment 



CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

5. The Report on Christian Literature was made 
by Dr. W. K. McGee, pastor of the First Church, 
Thomasville. 

Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by 
Dr. McGee and Dr. L. L. Carpenter, Editor of The Bib- 
lical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C. The report was adopted. 

The American people have been trained to read. For the most 
part, they seem not to spend much time in choosing their reading. 
For this reason, they read a great deal which has no lasting value 
for them, and much which has a hurtful influence. 

A vast mass of reading matter is kept before our people. A great - 
portion of this is of a poor grade and much of it is bad. But there 
is a great deal of excellent literature which is easily obtainable. 
Much of this is secular matter which is valuable for the reader. And 
there is much fine Christian literature available. 

We strongly recommend to our churches that they establish and 
maintain good church libraries, keep before their people a guide to 
good Christian literature, and provide as nearly as possible an ade- 
quate supply of the best and most important of this for each member 
pf their church families. We lu-ge parents and others of the homes 
of our churches to provide for their members a generous supply 
of good books and magazines and the literature offered by our De- 
nominational publishing houses for every age group of the home. 



Rev. L. J. Matthews 

. Rev. C. C. Eddinger 
Mrs. C. C. Coppedge 
. Rev. E. F. Mumford 
... Mr. M. A. Huggins 
.... Rev. John Jarre tt 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



Our Sunday School literature is provided in most cases by the 
Sunday Schools and churches. The W. M. U. magazines can be 
secured at small subscription prices. "Home Missions", of our Home 
Mission Board, and "The Commission", of our Foreign Mission 
Board, can be had for only twenty-five cents and fifty cents per year 
and should be in every home. "Charity and Children", our Baptist 
Orpihanage paper is usually, and should be always, provided by the 
I Sunday Schools. "The Biblical Recorder", the weekly publication 
of our Baptist State Convention, is the one magazine which provides 
information about our whole Baptist life and work. It is one of the 
best edited papers among Baptists. Each week it is filled with in- 
formation about different phases of our Baptist work, timely edi- 
torials, valuable articles, news items from the churches, devotional 
helps and other reading. No well informed Baptist home in North 
Carolina can be without "The Biblical Recorder", and no Baptist 
home in the State should be without it. 

During the past year the circulation of "The Biblical Recorder" 
has had a net increase of 7,000, and now totals 18,000. It well merits 
the favor it is gaining among our people. It has three subscription 
plans : 

First, individual subscriptions, at $2.00 per year. 

Second, the club plan at $1.50 a year, a minimum of at least 
three subscriptions from a church reporting less than a hundred 
members, and at least five for a church reporting more than a hun- 
dred members. 

Third, the budget or family plan at $1.20 a year, one subscription 
for each active, resident family of the church. This budget or family 
plan should be the goal of every church and should be provided in 
the budget of the church. 

We feel that "The Biblical Recorder" is fulfilling its mission 
in a fine way under the leadership of its editor. Dr. L. L. Carpenter. 
We hope no church in the Liberty Association will let this year close 
without having a "Recorder Club", and that our churches will begin 
adopting the family plan and put the "Recorder" in the church 
budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. K. McGEE. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

6. The Report on the Baptist Hospital was made 
by D. S. Hayworth, a leading layman from the Abbotts 
Creek Church. 

After motion to adopt the report it was discussed 
by Mr. Hayworth and Smith Hagaman, Superinten- 
dent of the Hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

The Baptist Hospital has completed a full year with its enlarged 
facilities. Instead of caring for 4,000 patients as formerly, we have 
had 12,000 the past year — 1942. It is again becoming increasingly 
difficult to provide for the growing numbers of sick who come for 
treatment — an average of 33 each day. 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



Of these 12,000 patients who were treated last year, 4,000 were 
service patients; that is, were unable to pay a hospital bill. These 
are the sick for whom our Mother's Day Offering is made. It is 
also interesting to note that 4,000 of this 12,000 patients were mothers 
who had, here and there in our state, 12,000 children waiting anxious- 
ly for her return. We had also about 175 ministers, returned mis- 
sionaries, ministerial students and children from our orphanage for 
whom no charge was made. 

The Hospital Training School for Nurses has 116 students in 
training, 51 staff and graduate nurses, with an addition of 22 nurses 
and Red Cross Aids, making a nursing staff of 189. 

It is one of the functions of the Baptist Hospital to educate as 
many nurses as possible with the Christian ideal of service. These 
are always .-selected so as to represent as nearly as possible every 
section, of our state. 

Although quite a number of our medical staff are constantly 
going into the service of our country, we still have a staff of about 
75 doctors, almost all of whom are specialists in the several fields of 
medicine and surgery. 

These two institutions — Hospital and Medical School — ^represent 
a money value to the denomination of $2,000,000. 

It is with a just pride, we trust, that the American Medical 
Association has given the Baptist Hospital the highest rating of any 
hospital in the entire south, save one. 

The hospital desires to express to the members of this association 
their appreciation for the best Mother's Day Offering ever, and also 
to the W. M. U.'s and other church agencies this same appreciation 
for their generous contributions of hospital linen. 

The hospital was built and has operated for these 20 years with 
one great fundamental purpose: That it shall be an institution 
through which the half million Baptist of our state may render a 
definite Christian Service to sick and suffering humanity who could 
not, in most instances, have hospital treatment otherwise. It is the 
purpose of the denomination and the management that it shall for- 
ever remain true to this one purpose in addition to its wider service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. S. HAYWORTH. 

ROLL CALL OF THE CHURCHES 

6A. The roll call of the churches was made at this 
time by the clerk. All churches except one were rep- 
resented. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES BY THE 
MODERATOR 

7. At this time the Moderator appointed the fol- 
lowing committees: 

ON FINANCE— Rev. N. C. Teague, Chairman, Perry Green, J. L. 
Carrick, J. W. Myers, and Everett Pierce. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— Rev. C. C. Eddinger, Rev. Chas. 
S. Young, Charley Kanoy, C. F. Motsinger, and Rev. Thomas B. 
Flo we. 

TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING THE REPORTS NEXT YEAR— 
Miss Sallie MoCracken, Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Mrs. C. C. Coppedge 
T. H. Small and Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 

TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR— Rev. L. J. Mat- 
thews, Chairman, C. M. Wall, Sr., E. S. Craver and H. C. Myers. 

ON OBITUARIES— J. W. Dickens, Sam J. Smith, C. W. Willbanks, 
R. C. Wall, L. E. Rickard and G. E. Morefield. 

ON RESOLUTIONS— Rev. J. A. Cox, John Coppley, J. V. Luther, 
J. W. Byars, Mrs. R. S. Green. 

COUNCIL ON ADMISSION OF NEW CHURCHES— Rev. Louis S. 
Gaines, Rev. J. A. Neilson, Rev. W. K. McGee, G. W. Miller, D. S. 
Hayworth and Sam J. Smith. 

ON GROUPING OF CHURCHES— Rev. J. Arch McMillan, J. C. Reid, 
A. L. Snider, Mrs. L. E. Hepler and L. C. Carrick. 

8. Mr. Carey Davis led the Association in singing 
"I Need Thee Every Hour". 

ANNUAL SERMON 

9. The Scripture was read by Rev. W. L. Bray, pas- 
tor of the Rich Fork Church. The readings were from 
the 29th chapter of 1st Chronicles and the 12th chapter 
of Romans. 

The prayer was made by Rev. J. D. Newton. 

The Annual Sermon was delivered by Rev. B. A. 
Mitchell, pastor of the Abotts Creek and Wallburg 
churches. His subject was LIFE'S FOREMOST CALL; 
the text being taken from the 29th chapter of First 
Chronicles and the 5th verse. 

ANNOUNCEMENT IN REGARD TO SERVING 
LUNCH 

10. Rev. Louis S. Gaines, pastor of the host church, 
Lexington, announced the plans to be observed in serv- 
ing the Noon Lunch. 

NEW PASTORS RECOGNIZED 

11. The following New Pastors in the Association 
were recognized at this time: 

Rev. C. B. Atkinson, pastor of the Erlanger church. 
Rev. Thomas B. Flowe, pastor of Southside church. 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



Rev. R. L. Kyser, pastor of Reid Street church. 
Rev. E. T. Sims, pastor of Welcome church. 
Rev. E. D. Young, pastor Summerville church. 

RECOGNITION OF VISITORS 

12. During the Morning Session the following visi- 
tors registered and were duly recognized : 

Dr. L. L. Carpenter, Editor of Biblical Recorder, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. ; Mr. M. A. Huggins, Gen. Sec'y Baptist 
State Board, Raleigh, N. C. ; Smith Hagaman, Supt. 
Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; Rev. and Mrs. 
E. C. Roach, of First Church, Kannapolis, N. C; Dr. 
M. A. Kendall, Professor of Bible at Mars Hill College; 
Mr. Hugh O. Miller, High Point, N. C; Mr. V. H. Har- 
rell, Winston-Salem, N. C; Mrs. Clarrissa Ann Ward, 
Lexington, N. C. ; Mr. M. W. Chapman, Rt. 2, Salis- 
bury; Mr. D. H. Lowder, Salisbury, N. C. ; Mrs. W. D. 
Williamson, Salisbury, N. C. ; Mrs. H. B. Miller, High 
Point, N. C. ; Mrs. J. L. Cottrell, Lenoir, N. C. ; Rev. H. 
W. Baucom, Wake Forest, N. C. ; Rev. R. E. Herst, 
Asheboro, N. C. ; Gordon Wilson, Washington, D. C. ; 
Rev. C. M. Floyd, Piedmont Association; Mrs. D. N. 
Nelms, Louisburg, N. C. 

ADJOURNMENT 

13. The Association adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to re- 
convene at 1:45 P. M. 



TUESDAY 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

14. The afternoon Devotional was led by Rev. C. B. 
Atkinson, pastor of the Erlanger Baptist Church. 

His subject used was 'They Went Forth Preaching.'' 

The songs were led by Gary Davis. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

15. The report on Christian Education was made 
by Rev. John Arch McMillan, editor of Charity and ' 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Children. 

ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

16. An eloquent and masterful address was deliv- 
ered to the Association by Dr. W. H. Kindall, Profes- 
sor of Bible at Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, N. C. His 
subject was ''When Can a College Be Called Chris- 
tian?" 

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

17. The report on State Missions was made by Rev. 
C. C. Eddinger. 

The report on Home Missions was read by Mrs. 
Beamer Barnes, same having been prepared by Mrs. 
C. C. Coppedge. 

The report on Foreign Missions was made by Rev. 
E. F. Mumford. 

The reports were all adopted. 

REPORT OF STATE MISSIONS 

In North Carolina about one out of every two belonging to any 
church belongs to a Baptist church. And to go a little further, let 
it be said that one out of every five of the total white population in 
North Carolina is Baptist. If we include the total population, al- 
most one out of four is a Baptist. This means that if Baptists were 
genuinely Christian our State would be well on the way toward being 
a Christian state. And yet everyone knows that as a state we are 
far from being Christian. It means also, that Baptists would appear 
to be at least one-half responsible for the one million human souls 
in North Carolina who have never yet said yes to Christ. 

Through our State Mission program at present we are attempt- 
ing to develop a teaching and training program of those already in 
the chiu-ch. At the same time through aid to missionary pastors, 
through help to growing churches in needy and strategic places, and 
in other ways the State Mission program is seeking to win some 
of these millions of souls to Christ. 

During the present year there is available for this State Mission 
program about $150,000. It ought to be at least $250,000. The war 
areas in the East are the greatest challenge we face at the moment. 

Wlhat is the individual to do about this? What is the church 
to do about it? 

The answer is: Support the Baptist Cooperative Program, for 
State Missions receives 15% of the Undesignated Cooperative Pro- 
gram money. Recently an appeal has been sent out for an extra 
offering to help in the work around the camps. Churches which 
have not taken this offering are urged to do so. Then it must be 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



remembered that each year on the last Sunday in October the Sun- 
day schools are asked to make a generous offering for the whole 
State Mission program. Also, the Woman's Missionary Union is 
laying unusual stress on their State Mission program this fall. They 
will make their offering in September. ONE noT.T.AR, just one 
dollar, from each adult member of our churches would give us an 
offering of about $100,000. 

We Baptists have a tremendous responsibility to aid in growing 
a Christian state. To this end let us give our prayers and our means 
with enthusiasm. 

C. C. EDDINGER. 

THE ROMANCE OF HOME MISSIONS 

Sujgiffested Report on Home Missions for 1943 

The romance of Home Missions is the romance that clusters 
around the toil and struggle and sacrifice of devoted, consecrated, 
heroic men and women who have labored for a nation's spiritual re- 
generation. 

The homeland with its rivers and its rills, its firesides and its 
busy mills, its sacred memories, and its hallowed places — these shall 
ever live in the heart of the patriot. To the Christian they are 
doubly dear. His soul has a tie that is stronger than love of country; 
it is the tie of religious devotion, of faith in God and of experiences 
that make the homeland sacred because of the altars of faith built 
along the way. Is there no romance connected with the church 
nestled among the trees by the side of the road where years ago a 
strange, glad experience came into the soul just after the heart had 
melted under a message from the man of God in the pulpit? 

This is the romance of Home Missions: the romance of mingled 
faith in God and patriotic devotion to one's country. This is the 
highest patriotism, for deep in the hearts of men the principles are 
laid through faith in Christ that make for the progress and pros- 
perity of the state. 

Debts Paid 

Occasion for universal rejoicing among Southern Baptists is the 
fact that for the first time since 1920 the Home Mission board is 
out of debt, the final note of the Board's indebtedness being paid on 
May 12, 1943. When the final $55,000 note was paid on that date it 
terminated a struggle against debt for fifteen years during which 
time the Home Mission Board paid a total of $2,425,531.91 on debts. 
Since 1933 the Hundred Thousand Club has furnished $636,900.21 
which was over one-fourth, of the total amount of debts paid by the 
Home Mission Board, the other three-fourths being paid by the Board 
from Co-operative Program and general denominational receipts. 

Over 400 Workers 

The Board's report shows a total of 435 workers on all fields. 
During the year thirteen new missionaries were added, forty-three 
mission stations opened and six churches constituted. 

The missionaries distributed 14,445 Bibles and Testaments and 
672,093 tracts. They preaOhed 37,657 sermons, and led 15,928 to pro- 
fess faith in Christ. 

During the year the Board enlarged its work on all fields and 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



also added new departments. Notable among these was the city 
mission department of which Dr. Solomon F, Dowis is superintendent. 

The Board is also planning to create a department for the re- 
vitalization of the country church. A program is being worked out 
which will, when carried into effect throughout the land, re-establish 
the country church as a potent factor in denominational life. 

Total offerings for the year amounted to $767,371.41. This total 
included $333,785.71 from the Co-operative Program; $224,910.38 from 
the .A.nnie Armstrong offering, $112,312.34 from the Hundred Thou- 
sand Club, and $53,068.83 from general designations. The Bottoms 
Trust Fund yielded an income of $33,663.05. 

Dr. Beagle Retires 
After twenty-six years of service with the Home Mission Board, 
sixteen of which he had given as field secretary in charge of mis- 
sion work in the homeland. Dr. J. W. Beagle was granted retirement 
upon his request January 1, 1943. In the final report presented by 
Dr. Beagle, he revealed that there were 271 workers in his depart- 
ment who reported 4,089 conversions and 2,014 baptisms for the 
year 1942. 

Departcmeintal Reports 
Progress is revealed by the Board in the city mission program, 
its camp work, its educational and promotional activities, co-opera- 
tive work with the Negroes, and Jewish evangelization. The Board's 
monthly magazine, "Southern Baptist Home Missions" has reached 
a circulation of over 87,000 a month. Dr. M. N. McCall, superin- 
tendent of the work in Cuba, states that work in the island has 
continued with encouraging results. Rev. Paul C. Bell, superintendent 
in Panama, records gospel victories on that challenging field. 

MRS. C. C. COPPEDGE. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS REPORT 

On March 12, 1943, the efficient and competent Foreign Mission 
Board reported all debts paid. Wise management and cooperation 
of the hosts of Southern Baptists made this possible. It is with 
humble gratitude and thankful hearts that we face a challenging 
future. 

Even under the burden of debt the Foreign Mission Board did 
not fail to carry on its program of service in the mission fields^ — 
caring for 481 active missionaries and its 78 noble workers now on 
the emeritus list, supporting the work of the churches and hospitals, 
the schools and publication houses, its evangelists and colporteurs, 
and attended to the upkeep of property. 

The Board has been active in relief work. Between January 1, 
1942, and April 5, 1943, it gave the following: To the British Foreign 
Board, $200,00.00; Chinese Relief, $200,000.00; for the purchase of 
Bibles for Russian prisoners in Germany, $15,000.00; sent for Euro- 
pean relief, $45,500.00; to other emergency calls, $427,302.66; total, 
$887,802.66. 

The support given by the Woman's Mission Union of the South 
has been wonderful. Many needed gifts have been made, but the 
outstanding gift was the Lottie Moon Christmas offering which to 
May 1, had reached the record-breaking peak of $558,672.63. 

In Richmond, Va., the details of the increasing work is carried 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



on by the Executive Secretary, Dr. Charles E. Maddry, and a staff 
of thirty workers. Here is published the Commission, the Foreign 
Mission Journal launched in January, 1938. Its growth has been 
gratifying and it now has a subscription of 60,000. Dr. E. C. Routh 
of Oklahoma is editor-in-chief. A great deal of time and thought 
is given by the Board in writing and publishing books to be used in 
study courses. A regular graded series on Africa was prepared for 
use in 1943. This to be followed by a series of inspirational studies 
and biographies of some of Southern Baptists' outstanding pioneer 
missionaries. 

Because of war conditions some of our faithful Foreign Mission- 
aries are interned in China, some are marooned in the Portuguese 
colony Macao, and others are held in Japanese controlled Manila. 
Southern Baptists are urged to pray for their safe and speedy return 
to .America. 

Quite a number of Missionaries in the United States on pro- 
longed furloughs are rendering invaluable service in conventions, at 
summer conferences, in goodwill centers, and at local Missionary 
gatherings. Some have accepted pastorates; others are studying and 
preparing themselves for future usefulness. 

War conditions have closed the doors in Europe and the Near 
East to our Missionaries, but we need to take courage when we learn 
,that native Christians in Italy, Rumania, Hungary, Yugoslavia and 
the Near East are proving to be "steadfast, unmovable" and "abound- 
ing in the work of the Lord." 

In Spain restrictions in many places keep the Baptists from 
meeting in churches, but they come together in homes and other 
places where large crowds gather and people are converted. 

Amid Italy's dire poverty the Baptist pastors have pooled their 
meager salaries, and now it is reported that all of them receive the 
same inadequate pittance. 

From Africa Dr. George Green reports: Christianity is abroad. 
. . . Southern Nigeria . . . Our Mission work is moving steadily for- 
ward. . . . Our Teacher Training College at Iwo, our Theological Sem- 
inary at Ogbomosho, and the Nurses' Training School at the 
Hospital in Ogbomosho are busy training teachers, preachers and 
nurses. Several Missionaries now home on furlough and three re- 
cently appointed couples are awaiting an opportunity to get to Africa 
to invest their lives for Christ in that needy land. 

In Japan and Japanese-occupied areas of China the doors are 
closed. However the Oriental Christians are carrying on faithfully. 
Through the faithfulness of Southern Baptist Missionaries, Chinese 
people of culture and rank have become interested in a religion that 
makes men and women forget self in order that they may serve 
strangers of another race. 

In Free China the work of evangelism is going forward in an 
unusual way. Hospitals and schools continue to function, churches 
are crowded as eager people seek a living, loving God. 

Open Door Im Latin America 

War conditions have brought about a curtailment of Mission 
work in the war zones and made possible the expanding of the work 
in Latin America, where Southern Baptists are cooperating with the 
national conventions of seven Republics — Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, Paraguay, Urguay and the recently established Mission in 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



Colombia. It is the policy of the Foreign Mission Board to develop 
native leadership for all phases of the work and the seminaries and 
training schools are furnishing pastors, teachers, and other leaders 
well equipped for the task. 

At the April meeting of the Board several new Missionaries were 
appointed to reinforce the work being done in Latin America. 

Hawaii 

This island Mission has indeed come into being "for such a time 
as this." Strategically located, it 15 able to render invaluable service 
to Occidentals and Orientals. Manned by experienced Missionaries 
who have been cut off from their own fields of service it is exerting 
a world-wide influence. 

"The field is the world" Southern Baptists are to sow and reap. 

K P. MUMFORD. 

ADDRESS BY M. A. HUGGINS, SECRETARY OF 
BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

18. Mr. Huggins at this time delighted the delegates 
with one of his masterful addresses. 

He suggested that the delegates go back home and 
tell their people that Baptists of North Carolina were 
doing some big things, but that there were bigger 
things needing to be done. He stated that the coming 
year, 1944, would see the Convention out of debt. 

He stated that thus far in 1943 the Baptists of the 
State had given to Benevolences, Missions and Educa- 
tion 30% more than they had given last year at this 
time, but the increase for the Liberty Association was 
only 8%. He suggested that this also be told to our 
churches back home. 

He also noted that we would give the sum of $1,300,- 
000.00 to Missions, Benevolences and Education this 
year, but this he said will come from the 100 counties 
of the state, and that it made him feel chagrined when 
he read in the News and Observer this morning that 
during the last year the county of Wake had spent for 
liquor and wine the sum of $2,142,000.00. 

REPORT OF COUNCIL ON ADMISSION OF NEW 
CHURCHES AND ADMISSION OF FLOYD 
BAPTIST CHURCH . 

19. The Council appointed at the Morning Session 
on the Admission of New Churches, through its chair- 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



man, Rev. Louis S. Gaines, made its report at this time. 
The report was adopted, and was as follows: 

The Committee makes the following recommendations: 

1 — Your committee recommends the reception into 'full fellowship 
in the life and work of the Association of the Floyd Baptist Church 
located in Healing Spring township, this church was organized in 
August, 1942, has a present membership of 39. Brother Howard Hunt 
is now serving as pastor. 

2— Your committee also recommends that any group or com- 
munity anticipating the organization of a new Baptist work within 
the bounds of our Association (I) be requested to consult with the 
Executive Committee of the Association as to the advisability of such 
procedure, and (2) that the Executive Committee, upon hearing of 
any such plan on the part of any group in the Association, be re- 
quested to acquaint that group with the plan formally adopted by the 
association for the organization of new work as recorded in the 1942 
Minutes of the Association, page 8. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES, 
, WM. K. McGEE, 

J. A. NEILSON, 
D. S. HAYWORTH, 
G. W. MILLER, 
S. J. SMITH, 

Committee. 

STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

20. In the absence of Rev. John F. Jarrett, who was 
appointed to make the report on this subject the report 
was made by Rev. Louis S. Gaines, pastor of the Lex- 
ington church. 

The report was adopted and follows: 

MEMBERSHIP-^Members reported this year are 7,362 over 
against 7,287 reported last year (Floyd Mission having reported 9 
members a year ago, but this figure was not in the Minute total) ; 
this denotes a NET GAIN IN MEMBERSHIP of 75. There were 320 
baptisms during the year, with six (6) churches reporting NO bap- 
tisms. We baptized 61 more this year than last year. Nineteen (19) 
of our churches show a net increase in membership, nine (9) show a 
net DECREASE, while two (2) show the same membership as last 
year. Total ADDITIONS this year amount to 505, with total LOSSES 
amounting to 430. Note: (The NET GAIN last year was 222 against 
75 this year. This difference is accoimted for largely by the fact that 
tlTis year we granted 52 more letters than last year, and erasures this 
year exceeded last year's by 128.) COMMENT: It is likely that more 
of our churches should revise their rolls and bring them down to 
reality. It will be noted that both Erlanger and Soutl>side did this 
during the year. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL— Enrollment this year is 6,668, a DECREASE 
of 265. The average attendance dropped from 4,013 to 3,769, a DE- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



CREASE of 244. Thirteen (13) churches conducted Daily Vacation 
Bible Schools during the summer with an enrollment of 993, and 
an average attendance of 835. 

TRAINING UNION— There are 75 Training Unions reported, a 
DECREASE of 13 under last year. There is also a DECREASE in 
average attendance from 1,041 to 900 this year. Thirteen (13) 
churches report no Training Unions. Fifty-six (56) young people 
are reported as college students. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION— The W. M. U. reports 116 
organizations with 1,933 enrolled, an INCREASE of 2 organizations, 
but a DECREASE of 133 members. The number of churches report- 
ing no missionary organization is 7. 

FINANCE— (a)— Local Church expenses show a total of $67,414.82, 
a loss of $2,110.52*. (b) The grand total for denominational work this 
year is $30,326.77, an INCREASE over last year of $2,288.03. (c) Or- 
phanage gifts this year totalled $6,892.03, INCREASE of $1,095.24. 
(d) Gifts for all causes this year totalled $97,741.59, INCREASE of 
$177.51. (e) Per capita giving of the churches follows: Abbotts 
Creek, $10.92; Carolina Avenue, $14.31; Center Hill, $11.72; Church- 
land, $6.11; Denton, $13.43; Erlanger, $17.17*(6); Floyd Mission, $5.46; 
Holloways, $6.96; Jersey, $9.72; Lexington, $27.34* (2); Liberty, $4.73; 
Lick Creek, $5.21; Mills Home, $10.81; Mountain View, $12.16; New 
Friendship, $18.20* (4); Oak HiU Memorial, $19.17* (3); Pleasant 
Plains, $1.00; Reeds, $7.47; Reid Street, $14.60; Rich Fork, $17.28*(5); 
Sheets Memorial, $16.51; Smith Grove, $10.08; Southside, $43.43* (1); 
Stoners Grove, $7.91; Summerville, $2.04; Taylors Grove, $2.02; 
Thomasville, $12.82; Wallburg, $12.68; Walter's Grove, $3.84; Welcome, 
$7.20. 

*The difference shown on the chart distributed— between Local 
Expenses this year and last year is given as $2,083.52— THIS IS IN 
ERROR— it should read: $2,110.52. 

*(l-2-3-4-5-6)The six highest per capita churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES. 

ADJOURNMENT 

21. After being led in the closing prayer by Rev. 
Louis S. Gaines, pastor of the Lexington church, the 
Body adjourned to reconvene at 9 :45 tomorrow morn- 
ing. 



THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY MORNING 

22. Mr. Carey Davis was in charge of the Devotion- 
al Song Service. The Devotional was conducted by G. 
E. Morefield of the Smith Grove church. Mr. More- 
field is a student for the Ministry. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1944 

23. The Committee heretofore appointed to nomi- 
nate officers for next year, made the following report 
which was adopted: 

We recommend for: 
Moderator— Rev, H. M. Stroup. 
Vice Moderator — D. S. Hay worth. 
Clerk and Treasurer — Albert L. Snider. 
Orphanage Representative— C. M. Wall, Sr. 

Chairman of Executive Promotion Committee— Rev. L. S. Gaines. 
Associational Biblical Recorder Rep.— Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 
Associational Sunday School Supt. — C. F. Motsinger. 
Director of Associational B. T. U.— Wilbur Lewis. 
Members of The Associational Executive Committee — N. C. 

Teague, C. V. Teague, B. A. Mitchell, L. J. Matthews. 

L. J. MATTHEWS, 

C. M. WALL, SR., 

E. S. Craver, 

H C. MYERS, 

Committee on Nominations. 

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO 
SAM J. SMITH 
FOR HIS SERVICES AS CLERK OF THE BODY 

24. The following resolution was offered and adopt- 
ed by a unanimous standing vote. 

"In view of the fact that Brother Sam J. Smith has resigned as 
Clerk of the Liberty Baptist Association after serving continuously 
for a term of twenty years, we wish to offer the following resolutions: 
"First, that we with reluctance accept this resignation. 
"Second, that we express to Brother Smith our sincere appre- 
ciation for his prompt, faithful and efficient services. During this 
time our minutes have attained an outstanding place among the 
Associational minutes of the Southern Baptist Convention and this 
is due solely to the competent efforts of Brother Smith . 

"Third, that we feel our indebtedness to him for his many self- 
sacrifices in doing a pains-taking and difficult work and also for his 
useful and effective leadership in the work of the Association. 

"Fourth, that a copy of these resolutions be printed in our 
minutes and a copy be sent to the Biblical Recorder. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. M. WALL, 
E. S. CRAVER, 
H. C. MYERS, 
L. J. MATTHEWS, 

Committee." 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

25. The following report was adopted: 

We, the undersigned, have checked the reports of Mr. Sam J. 
Smith, Clerk of the Liberty Baptist Association, and have found 
them to be true and correct, as reported. 

The amount of $160.65 has been paid to date on the 1943 Minute 
Fund, with 5 churches who have not paid as yet. 

We recommend that the Clerk be paid $50 for his services. 

N. C. TEAGUE, 
W. P. GREEN, 
J. L. CARRICK, 
E. G. PIERCE, 

Committee. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

26. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer for the Association, 
made his report, which was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
Receipts for the 1942 Session 



Balance on hand from 1941 Session $ 11.52 

Amount collected for 1942 Minute Fund 208.00 



Total Recipts $219.58 

Disbiiirseimeints for 1942 Session 

Fred O. Sink Print Shop for Printing Minutes $140.00 

Charity and Children, Printing Programs 6.50 

Helen Smith, Clerical Help 10.00 

Postmaster, Lexington, N. C, Postage and Stationery 12.60 

Betained my Salary 50.00 



Total Disbursements $219.10 

Balance on Hand 48 



$219.58 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

27. The report on Sunday Schools was made by Rev. 
L. J. Matthews. Upon motion to adopt the report it 
was discussed by Mr. Matthews and was adopted. 

Paul in writing to Timothy, his son in the ministry, laid down 
the requirements for a pastor. Among those requirements we find 
he is to be one "apt to teach." In the second letter to Timothy 
(4:5) the exhortation is given to "do the work of an evangelist." 
With the Bible as the text book and a teacher enlightened by the 
Holy Spirit, the most inviting and promising field of evangelism in 
the world exists in the Sunday School. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



This report cannot be an encouraging one so far as statistics 
^re concerned. Many hundreds of our finest and most capable 
young people have gone from us to the armed forces, defense indus- 
tries, and other places of employment. Other hundreds of our mem- 
bership are kept from attendance in Simday School and worship 
because of the seven-day program for defense. Due to these causes 
and an attitude of excuse-making and relaxation that seems to be 
increasing among our resident constituency, there was a decrease of 
122,538 in the enrolment of Southern Baptist Sunday Schools last 
year. In our own Association we note an enrolment of 6,668 for this 
jpresent year, which indicates a decrease of 265. There is also a 
decrease of 244 in average attendance. 

On the other hand there is an estimated 1,725,000 unenlisted 
adult church members, exclusive of those subject to induction into 
the armed forces of the nation, who are greatly in need of the Bible 
study and fellowship of our Sunday Schools and worship. This 
is a good time to exercise our good common sense and sieze a great 
opportunity for a new and vigorous campaign for adults in our 
Sunday Schools, thereby, we will be able to recover all our Sunday 
School losses. 

The Vacation Bible School is proving a valuable asset to the 
churches where it has been conducted. Once begun it is a permanent 
part of the church program for the children are insistent that it not 
be omitted. So far as the records reveal there are 14 in our Asso- 
ciation this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. MATTHEWS. 

APPOINTMENT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

28. The Moderator at this time appointed the fol- 
lowing to serve on the Program Committee for next 
year; Rev. L. J. Matthews, Sam J. Smith and G. C, 
Palmer ; these in addition to the ones stipulated in res- 
olution passed at 1941 session. (See page 31, 1941 
Minutes.) 

ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

29. At this time a masterful address was delivered 
on Christian Education by Rev. H. W. Baucom, teach- 
er of Bible at Wake Forest College. 

He told in a wonderful manner of the past and pres- 
ent work of Wake Forest College and of the great 
place in the life of the nation Wake Forest graduates 
are taking. In medicine, ministry, law and other pro- 
fessions, of the hundreds of Wake Forest men that are 
college presidents and professors over the land; and 
how its graduates had gone out as missionaries all over 
the world. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE 

30. The report on the Orphanage was brought by 
C. C. Wall of the Lexington church and a member of 
the Trustees of the institution. 

The report was discussed by Mr. Wall and John- 
nie Chandler, a former occupant of the home and now 
a ministerial student at Mars Hill. 

The report was adopted. 

Tooday with present world-wide chaotic conditions, there comes 
a great opportunity and challenge to our denomination. Are we 
willing to meet and accept this challenge? The answer is and must 
be in the affirmative. 

This is the third time the Baptist Orphanage of North Caro- 
lina, Inc., has been called to service. Each time we have met the 
challenge. 

According to the best information over 229 boys and girls Who 
once lived in the Orphanage are now in some branch of service. We 
have every reason to be proud of this record. 

Today as never before we find ourselves torn between two great 
urges. One to win the war and the other in winning the war to 
preserve the blessings for which we are fighting. The first we will 
do and the second we must do if we are to rebuild this shocked and 
battered world. To do this we must safeguard the youth of today. 
It is our task to help build into the fibre of young people these 
qualities so they may prepare to build for themselves a better world. 

The greatest asset to the orphanages are the many friends who 
love it and with that love comes the worthy Thanksgiving offering 
and monthly offering from the Sunday Schools. 

Finally the main and chief purpose of the orphanage is to make 
worthwhile men and women of the dependent boys and girls whose 
keeping God has entrusted to us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. WALL. 

HAND OF FELLOWSHIP GIVEN TO FLOYD 
CHURCH 

31. The new church of Floyd having been received 
into full fellowship of the Association yesterday, the 
delegates from that church were asked to come for- 
ward; and as the congregation sang "Am I a Soldier 
of the Cross" were given the hand of fellowship by the 
Body. 

(For names of the delegates see list of church mes- 
sengers) . 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

32. The report on the American Bible Society was 
made by Miss Sallie McCracken of the Mills Home 
church. The report was adopted. 

The work of the Society was discussed by Miss Mc- 
Cracken and Rev. J. A. Neilson. 

In the year 1942 resolutions were adopted in the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, the State Convention and the Liberty Association 
suggesting that the churches composing these bodies make contribu- 
tions to the work of the American Bible Society. 

In its 128 years of service the American Bible Society has never 
had a greater demand for its publications than it is having at the 
present time. Although they distributed about five and a half mil- 
lion volumes in 1942, this did not fill the needs. The business of 
publishing the Bible has in the last century become the greatest 
publishing enterprise in all history. 

The supply of the Scriptures falls heavily today on the American 
Bible Society and the American churches and people. The other 
Bible societies, being located in the war zones are greatly handi- 
capped on account of the shortage of paper, difficulties in the 
operation of printing and losses in personnel. In contrast to this, 
the American Bible Society produced last year more Scripture than 
in any previous year. In the past three years it has distributed 
through its War Emergency Fund more than 1,500,000 Bibles, Testa- 
ments and gospels in 34 different languages. These went to prison- 
ers of war, refugees in camps and to the men in the service all 
over the world. 

Since the Rickenbacker party's experience with John Bartek's 
Testament the American Bible Society has devised a plan for plac- 
ing a Testament in a water-proof container in every life boat. 

Throughout its existence the American Bible Society has offered 
to the chaplains in the army, navy and marines Bibles, Testaments 
and gospels for free distribution among their men. There is such 
a demand now, with the large number of enlisted men, the society is 
finding it hard to fill the orders promptly, even though the books 
come from the press at the rate of 5,000 a day month after month. 
The cost comes from the War Emergency Fund which at present 
shows a deficit of more than $16,000.00. 

The chaplains are pleading for Scriptures to be distributed to 
their men; the service men are asking for them; the prisoners are 
begging for them. Here is a brief statement from a chaplain: 

"I had Bible day in mid-ocean. I addressed hundreds of the 
men on deck on the importance of the Bible. They lined up by 
hundreds to get theirs. From then on to the end of the voyage It 
was the usual thing to see men sitting around all over the ship 
reading the Bible. May I request 800 for my next voyage?" 

Also here is a brief statement from a prisoner of war: "I am a 
South African prisoner of war, who became converted recently. I 
am studying the Bible with the view of doing work for the Kingdom 
of my Savior among the colored races in South Africa, after the war 
by His grace. My one great desire is to have a Bible of my own for 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



piy studies in which I will be able to make references for future use 
and which I will be able to take back home with me to South Africa." 

Since the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock the C?hristian peo- 
ple of America have had no greater opportimity than now presents 
itself— that of sending the greatest of Missionaries— the Bible — to 
the uttermost parts of the earth by giving of their means to pro- 
mote the work of the American Bible Society, Also, there is no 
greater assurance of results than that foimd in the Bible itself, 
Lsaiah 56:11: "So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my 
mouth; it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that 
which I please and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I send it." 

Respectfully submitted, 

SALLiE L. Mccracken. 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

33. The report was made by Rev. N. C. Teague, pas- 
tor of the Reeds and Churchland churches. The re- 
port was adopted. 

There is need today for special emphasis upon Christian citizen- 
ship. In so many ways there has been a local, national, and world 
breakdown in public morals. Many are confused, and these are 
critical times, but the Christian should i have some convictions and 
purposes and do something about them. We must be Christians; 
a^ Jesus invited and commanded, our righteousness must exceed 
those who make no profession of being followers of Christ and those 
who pretend and do not. In a democratic government the citizens 
have great responsibility. Default and silence should not character- 
ize us. 

As Christians and Christian churches our great responsibility in 
these war times is to save the souls of our people, yes, the soul of 
our nation. Yale University has sent out an appeal to the public 
that the nation's mind and soul be guarded. This appeal 
closes with these questions: "Of what worth is freedom from want, 
if our minds be on a lower intellectual level; or freedom from fear 
if we have a less cultured life to defend; or freedom of speech if 
we have poorer thoughts to express; or freedom of religion if we 
bring a less enlightened, faith to the worship of God?" As Chris- 
tians we must guard our moral attitudes, motives and ideals, spiritual 
faith and fellowship with God. It must be emphasized that right- 
eousness exalteth a nation. 

One of our greatest problems today is that of beverage alcohol. 
It is a problem from almost every angle from which you may view 
the nefarious business. It is an economic, a political, a social, an 
urgent moral problem. The beer, wine, and liquor businesses of our _ 
country are unceasing in their work to distribute their poisonous 
stuff; we as Christians cannot afford to let up for a minute in our 
opposition and positive efforts toward a sober nation. The last ten 
years of increasing liquor consumption have served to stir afresh 
the moral conscience, and today a new battle is being waged for 
more rigid control. Under the leadership of Dr. John L. Hill our 
Sunday School Board is pressing the battle against alcohol. A book 
entitled "The Great Destroyer" written by Mr. Aubrey Hearn and 
published by our S, S. Board should be read widely in every com- 



28 



MINUTES OP THE 



munity. In our own state the Allied Church League for the Aboli- 
tion of Beverage Alcohol with Brother I. G. Greer, President of our 
Baptist State Convention and Superintendent of our Orphanage — a 
trusted leader among us — as president, and Hon, L. A. Martin, 
Executive Director, deserves our hearty and full support. This 
League is launching an educational campaign against liquor and 
attempting to organize in every county and seeks the real coopera- 
tion of every church. Of pressing urgency right now is the condition 
in and around the army camps of our nation. We cannot win wars 
with drinking or drunken men planning the campaigns, carrying 
them out and handling the highly-developed machinery of today. 
In every way possible and all at the same time let us join an all-out 
war against alcohol. 

Another problem of today is connected with marriage and di- 
vorce, our homes of today and tomorrow. Not only looseness of 
morals aggravated by war conditions, but the breaking up tempo- 
rarily or permanently of homes by fathers and husbands going to 
war and war work and, also, due to the stepped-up tempo of the 
lives of our people the neglect of the children and youth — all of 
these things mightily affect our homes. The growing criminality of 
our boys and girls is one result already. War marriages may not 
help our home situation. We must do our utmost to save our homes 
and home life in these trying times. 

Prostitution and gambling are two other problems which should 
concern Christian citizens greatly. In view of all of our problems 
we should inform ourselves and our people about the evils of today; 
pray much; work unceasingly; vote wisely for a Christian country 
in deed and truth, "For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but 
against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the dark- 
ness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places." — 
(Eph. 6:12) 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. TEAGUE. 

ADDRESS ON TEMPERANCE AND INTOXICATING 

LIQUORS 

34. Mr. I. G. Greer, president of the Allied Church 
League for the Eradication of Beverage Alcohol, at 
this time delivered a most interesting address on the 
evils of Strong Drink. He stated among other things, 
that there are 450,000 saloons in the nation, and that 
liquor if it is not banished from the country will wreck 
it from an economic standpoint. 

That every Christian should demand its abolition, 
that our nation spent last year for liquor $800,000,000 
— more than it spent for education. That crime in our 
nation last year cost the taxpayers 15 billion dollars, 
most of which could be traced to liquor. That the 
liquor business is the most selfish business in the land, 
making its profits from unfortunate people and by 



LIBERTy BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



wrecking mankind. 

He told of an incident, where one of the inmates of 
the orphanage had asked him to see the Governor and 
try to get his father pardoned. This father had killed 
his wife and mother of the child in the orphanage. 

The State had sold the man liquor, which made him 
drunk and caused him to kill his wife. The State said 
for killing your wife you must go to the penitentiary. 
Then the State said to the orphanage, you must take 
care of this man's children. 

Mr. L. A. Martin, who is State Director of the 
League, stated that they proposed to go into every 
church, school and civic organization with the cam- 
paign for the eradication of beverage alcohols and 
asked for the help of every pastor, deacon and Sun- 
day School teacher in the campaign. 

PLEDGE OF ASSISTANCE IN CAMPAIGN 

On suggestion of the Moderator every Pastor, Dea- 
con and Sunday School teacher present pledged their 
assistance in the campaign to free the state of alcohol. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

34. The Body adjourned at 1 :00 P. M. to reconvene 
at 2:00 P. M. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

36. The Afternoon Devotion was conducted by Rev. 
J. A. Neilson, pastor of the Mills Home church. His 
subject was "What Does It Mean To Be Missionary?" 

W. M. U. REPORT 

37. The report on W. M. U. work was brought by 
Mrs. S. O. Hinkle of the New Friendship church. The 
report was adopted. 

The work and organization of the W. M. U. and its 
auxiliaries was discussed in an illustrative manner by 
Mrs. N. C. Teague. Acting with Mrs. Teague in the 
illustration were Mrs. V. R. Parker, Jane Parker, Dor- 
cas Gaines and Victor Kirkman, Jr., all of the Lexing- 



30 



MINUTES OP THE 



ton church, Mrs. Teague being from the Reeds church. 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association has had a 
splendid year. During 1942 the W. M. U. achieved the distinction of 
being Al. That is, it met all the requirements laid down by the South- 
wide W. M. U. Much is yet to be done if the chiefs aims are used 
as our guide from year to year. 

In giving the report, I would like along with it to give to you 
something of our plan of work. In our effective plan we have 6 
phases of work known as "Chief Aims." Even as Jesus presented 
His Disciples with a pattern for prayer in the Sermon on the Mount, 
so has Woman's Missionary Union made prayer the first of its six 
chief aims. Prayer is a key which being turned by the hand of faith 
unlocks all God's Treasures. 

We encourage individual and united prayer; establishments and 
maintenance of family altars; regular use in home circles and socie- 
ties of the Calendar of prayer; observance of the 9 o'clock prayer 
hour for world wide missions; observance of sessions of prayer for 
Home Missions; in March the Liberty W. M. U. Association gave 
$523.45, for State Missions season of prayer in September the offer- 
ing was $363.66 and Foreign Missions week of prayer in December 
we have $669.25. 

The power of prayer has not yet been fully explored by the 
human mind but the cultivation of these prayer plans will invoke the 
leadership of the Holy Spirit and fill with boldness those who speak 
His word. "After this manner therefore pray ye." 

Second in our Chief Aims is Enlistment. We try through our 
W. M. Societies and Young People's Organizations to enlist all the 
women and young people in our communities. The Liberty Associa- 
tion had a 10% increase in the total enrollment in W.. M. U. organi- 
zations during the year 1942. 

Third in our Chief Aims is Mission Study. The Scriptures have 
a great deal to say about knowledge as vital to acceptable servikse. 
The W. M. U. offers exceptional opportunities for getting this kind 
of knowledge through study courses, using books like "Missions in 
the Bible," "World Missions," "Biography" and "Methods". In Liberty 
Association we have had 105 Study Courses, 6 Schools of Missions, 
with an enrollment of 1247. 

Fourth in our Chief Aims is Community Missions. Community 
Missions is Christ- like living in regard to those around us, seeing 
the needs that we might give the Gospel Message to those who have 
it not and endeavor to meet their material needs. The reports that 
have been sent in are most gratifying and encouraging. 

Fifth in our Chief Aims are Tithes and Offerings. If we were 
called upon to say which of these six Chief Aims is most important 
probably v/ith one accord we would say "prayer" and "Bible Study," 
but if we measure their importance by the space given to the respec- 
tive subjects in God's Word, then we must name Tithes and Offer- 
ings. Just how important is it that we pay on and give offerings? 
As important as it is to send the Gospel for how can they preach 
except that they be sent. And how can they be sent without Tithes 
and Offerings. We are happy to report 487 tithers in our W. M. U. 
In 1942 we also reported as given for Cooperative Program $4,852.44 
and for Hundred Thousand Club $1,418.30. 

Now our Sixth and very important aim is Missionary Education 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



of Young People. We realize that the future church will be led by 
the men who are boys today and the women who are now girls. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. S. O. HINKLE, 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

37. The Report on Ministerial Relief was brought 
by G. W. Miller, of Lexington, former Moderator of 
the Association. The report was adopted. 

The workings of the insurance plan for pastors was 
discussed by Rev. N. C. Teague, L. E. Rickard, Dr. W. 
K. McGee and Mr. I. G. Greer 

Time and again historic events of great moment have attested 
the truth that nothing in life is quite so powerful as an idea whose 
hour has come. 

Thus it was in the movement that gave birth to the Relief and 
Annuity Board. That was true when quietly, yet irresistibly, a new 
social conscience on the matter of ministerial support and relief 
was pervading Southern Baptist life as the tide sweeps in possessing 
every inlet and bay. A new day for Ministerial Relief, support and 
age security was about to dawn and all who have lived to behold that 
dawn have beheld in it the glory and majesty of the Divine Presence. 
So we can say, "Hitherto, hath the Lord helped us." 

Southern Baptists prior to 1918 were not wholly unmindful of 
their obligation to provide assistance for their aged and disabled 
ministers and for their widows and orphans of their decesaed minis- 
ters. We may be sure that they did much more for their faithful 
retired spiritual leaders than was ever fully revealed in their reports 
to their associations. Our people generally speaking have loved and 
even reverenced their pastors. They accepted Paul's great words in 
First Corinthians 9:14 "Even so hath the Lord ordained that they 
which preach the gospel should live of the gospel." Yet the social 
implications of that and other Scriptures in both the Old and New 
Testament have been sadly overlooked by most of us. This aged-old 
problem has to a large degree been solved by the Relief and Annuity 
Board. At its 25th annual meeting in Dallas, Texas, last March, 
the board reports total assets of $6,166,766.37. 

Five and one-half million more have been paid out through the 
years in relief and annuity benefits. More than ten thousand minis- 
ters, missionaries, denominational workers, and ministers' widows 
are participating in one or more of the board's plans. 

It offers a stability of economic security to every denominational 
worker and employee throughout the Southern Baptist Convention, 
asking only the cooperation of all that it may render the largest 
possible service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. W, MILLER. 

REPORT ON B. T. U. 



38. The report on B. T. U. was made by Mrs. Beam- 



32 



MINUTES OP THE 



er Barnes, Secretary of the First church, Thomasville. 
The report was adopted. 

Training Union work in Liberty Association shows some gains 
over the year 1941-42. While these gains have not been great, they 
do stand for progress and prove that our churches are finding the 
Training Union Program a "must" in the life of a progressive church. 

The statistics given in this report come from the office at Ra- 
leigh and represent the reports that you have sent to that office 
during the past year. From our reports we find that we have 23 
churches with some kind of Training Union work. The Associational 
Minute for 1941-42 lists eleven churches with no work at all in the 
beginning of the past year. In September 1941, our Minute listed 
only 7 churches as having no work at all. This suggests that some 
of these churches have revived a work that had died during the 
summer, or that they failed to report their work in the church letter, 
or that a new work has been started in some of our churches during 
the past year. Of the 23 organizations reported, 21 have Directors. 
This is a gain of one director over last year. Judging from the 
presidents and leaders listed, there has been a decrease of one union 
in the Adult department. We now have 14 Adult Unions. No gain 
or loss was reported in the Young People's Department. We have 17 
Young People's Unions. We have 24 Intermediate Leaders and 26 
Junior Leaders, a gain of 3 in each department. This Indicates a 
gaiQ of 3 organizations in each department. The Story Hour figure 
is the same as last year, 10 organizations. 107 Study Course awards 
have been issued to this Association since January, 1943, a very small 
number for 23 organizations to receive. There Is no way to deter- 
mine the total Training Union enrollment for the Association until 
the Associational Minute is made up. We must all realize that there 
has been a severe loss in almost every church among the young 
people, and that our enrollment will probably fall far short of our 
expectations. 

The fact that our greatest gains were made in the Jimior and 
Intermediate Departments, suggests that the progress we are making 
is within the churches who already have a Training Union organi- 
sation. Our Training Unions need to be missionary in deed as well 
as in word and spirit. The greatest task our Associational leaders 
have before them is that of leading those of us who have Training 
Union work into helping organize and strengthen those who do not 
have any organization. There should be a greater gain in our Inter- 
mediate and Junior work during the year to come than we have ever 
known because we should work harder at reaching this group than 
we have heretofore. There are Intermediates in every community 
who need to be and who must be reached and won to Christ and 
the Church before they become young people. However, every church 
needs to realize that there can be no permanency to the work, and 
that the desired results will not come from a Church Training Pro- 
gram untU the whole church enters wholeheartedly into the task of 
training. This would mean an Adult Union in every church. It 
would mean an organization that is recognized, encouraged, sup- 
ported, and attended by the church members, the deacons, and the 
pastor of that church. 

The Associational Organization is complete and a very fine 
work has been done by our leaders during the past year. Let us not 
shorten our vision, nor slacken our efforts because the times are 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



difficult. In times like these the Traning Union is to every church 
an opportunity. Because many churches have suffered losses among 
its leaders, more than ever churches need training programs to 
prepare the untrained leadership that is taking over the tasks others 
have left, to discover the talent of its members and to cultivate lead- 
ership ability, thus making sure the church leadership of tomorrow. 
Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. BEAMER BARNES. 



REPORT ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

39. The Committee recommended the following, 
which was adopted: 

TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday, after the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1944, being September 5th and 6th, 1944. 

PLACE— First Baptist Church, Thomasville, N. C. 

PREACHER— Rev. C. B. Atkinson. 

ALTERNATE PREACHER— Rev. L. J. Matthews. 

C. F. MOTSINGER, 
L. J. MATTHEWS, 
CHAS. S. YOUNG, 
REV. THOS. B. FLOWE, 
C. C. EDINGER, 

Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE 
PERSONS TO BRING THE REPORTS NEXT YEAR 

40. The following recommendations of the Com- 
mittee were adopted: 

We recommend the following: 

NAME and OBJECT ADDRESS 

Baptist Hospitals— Dr. David C. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Christian Education — Rev. L. J. Matthews Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Home Missions— Miss Minnie Hayworth Rt. 2, High Point 

Foreign Missions — Mr. A. L. Snider Denton 

State Missions— Rev. D. W. Digh Rt. 6, Lexington 

Orphanage — Mr. L. E. Teague Thomasville 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement— Mr. L. A. Martin Lexington. 

Religious Literature— Rev. C. S. Young Lexington 

Digest of Church Letters and State of the Churches— Rev. J. A. Neil- 
son Thomasville (Mills Home) 

Ministerial Relief — Rev. N. C. Teague Rt. 3, Lexington 

American Bible Society Rev. C. B. Atkinson, Erlanger 

The committee recommends that the Association confer upon the 
associational head of the Sunday School, Woman's Missionary Union, 
and Baptist Training Union, the responsibility for their respective 
reports to the Association. 

B. A. MITCHELL, 



34 



MINUTB9 OP THE 



mSS SALLIE McORACKEN, 
MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES, 
T. H. SMITH, 

Ck)minittee. 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

41. The following resolution was offered and 
adopted: 

The committee on resolutions of the Liberty Baptist Association 
wishes to extend to the First Church of Lexington deep gratitude 
for the hospitality displayed in the cordial welcome extended and 
the abundant and delicious meals. . 

Thanks to its able pastor and the noble women of the church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

REV. J. A. OOX, 
MRS. R. S. OREES^, 
JOHN CX>PPLEY, 
J V. LUTHER, 
J. W. BYARS. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 

42. The Association standing in honor of the mem- 
bers, who have died during the last year. 

The list was read by Sam J. Smith, Clerk of the 
Association. After the reading of the names the Body 
was led in prayer by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor of the 
Mills Home church. 

(For list of the deceased members see page 44) 

DEDICATION OF MINUTES TO MEMORY OF 
REV. S. G. SNIDER 

43. Rev. N. C. Teague, made a motion that the Min- 
utes of 1943 be dedicated to the memory of Rev. S. G. 
Snider, who died during the past year. Rev. Snider 
was pastor of the Southside church. 

The motion was adopted. 

44. The closing prayer of the Association was of- 
fered by Mr. 1. G. Greer, General Manager of the 
North Carolina Baptist Orphanage. 

ADJOURNMENT 



Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
Moderator. 



Sam J. Smith, 
Clerk. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



MINUTES OF AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

Following are the minutes of the Associational W. 
M. U., and Sunday School meetings held at times other 
than that of the Association, and which were adopted 
to be included in the Minutes of the Association. 

WOMAN^S MISSIONARY UNION 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The annual meeting of Liberty Association Women's Missionary 
Union was held April 28, 1943, at Reeds Baptist Church. The meet- 
ing was called to order at 10:00 A. M, by Mrs. Louis S, Gaines, 
Superintendent. 

After the singing of "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name," the 
Devotional was led by Mrs. S. O. Hinkle of New Friendship Baptist 
Church. She used as her Scripture, Cor. 1:1-18. 

Miss Sallie L. McCracken was appointed to serve as secretary 
pro-tem. 

Mrs. Early Snyder of Reeds Church extended most cordial greet- 
ings to all present. 

The reading of the 1942 Minutes was omitted as they were pub- 
lished in the 1942 Minutes of Liberty Association. 

The following Committees were appointed to report at the after- 
noon session: 

Committee on Resolutions— -Chairman, Mrs. Spaugh Thomason, 
Mrs. J. A. Cox and Mrs. A. G. MoCormick. 

Committee on Place — ^Chairman, Mrs. Emma Mayberry, Mrs. D. 
W. Digh. 

The Nominating Committee had been appointed previously at 
an Executive Meeting. It consisted of: Chairman, Mrs. P. M. Hen- 
dricks, Miss Sallie L. McCracken and Mrs. H. M. Stroup. 

The roll call revealed 81 present who represented 17 churches. 
Each, church gave a brief report. 

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Mission Study report was read by Miss McCracken, in the 
absence of Mrs. I. G. Greer, Mission Study Chairman: 

ANNUAL ASSOCIATIONAL MISSION STUDY REPORT 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Classes, 46; Enrollment, 586; Record Card I, 11; Record Card II, 
8; Silver Seals, 311; Continuation Certificates, 3; Reading Cards, 19; 
Reading Stamps, 41; School of Missions, 6. 

Y. W. A.-^Classes, 16; Enrollment, 108; Certificates, 49; Seals, 63. 

G. A.— Classes, 14; Enrollment, 190; Reading Stamps, 2; Certifi- 
cates, 62; Seals, 128. 

R. A.— Classes, 20; Enrollment, 230; Certificates, 142; Seals, 203. 

Sunbeams— Classes, 9; Enrollment, 133; Certificates, 67; Seals, 88. 

Total number Classes held, 105; Total Enrollment in Classes, 
1,247; Total Awards including all kinds, 1,197; School of Missions, 6; 
Mission Institute, 1; Enrollment, 22; Southside, Thomasville; Reed 



36 



MINUTES OF THE 



Street, Thomas ville; Lexington, First; Welcome; Thomasville, First; 
Mills Home, Thomasville; Sheets Memorial, Lexington; New Friend- 
ship. 

Comparing these figui-es with those of '42, we find an increase 
in every phase of the work except with the Y. W. A. — the number 
of classes in that organization has decreased by six, and the number 
enrolled in classes by 45. 

THE COMMUNITY MISSIONS REPORT was read by Miss 
Elizabeth Smith in the absence of Mrs. Reid Smith, Community 
Missions Chairman. 

MRS. P. M. HENDRICKS, STEWARDSHIP CHAIRMAN pre- 
sented her report. 

THE LITERATURE CHAIRMAN, Mrs. Luther Matthews, 
stressed the usefulness of our Mission Magazines and urged that 
more subscribe. She also urged the parents secure copies of the 
various Yoimg People's Magazines for the children. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL CHAIRMAN, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, 
reported that the annual Valentine gift was sent to all North Caro- 
lina girls enrolled in the Training School at Louisville, Ky. Each 
girl received a gift of stationery. 

The Superintendent's report was contained in mimeographed 
sheets in the hands of each person. LIBERTY W. M. U. WAS Al 
FOR 1942. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 

Liberty Association Women's Missionary Union enjoyed a splen- 
did year in 1942. Extra activities: 

1— Miss Myrtle Zentmeyer spent nine days in the Association in 
June. She was able to touch all but one church having a W. M. S. 
We received much good from her visit. 

2 — A Young People's Rally was held in June at Rich Fork church. 

3— In early November Miss Zentmeyer returned for a Mission 
Study Institute held at Mills Home. 

4 — Just before Christmas Miss Ethel Harmon (Nigeria) spent a 
week speaking in several of the churches. 

5 — We are now gathering a fund to assist Edward Chow, a Chi- 
nese student at Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 

The Executive Committee met three times: (1) Planning-meeting 
in May; (2) Planning-meeting in January; and (3) Called meeting 
with Nominating Committee in March. 

The Associational Standard of Excellence was attained in 1942, 
making Liberty Women's Missionary Union A-1. 

HONOR ROLL 

W. M. S.— (A.l) Lexington First, Mills Home, New Friendship, 
Wallburg; (B) Denton, Erlanger, Thomasville First. 

Y. W. A.— (A-1) Lexington First, Mills Home, New Friendship, 
Thomasville First; (C) Carolina Avenue, Erlanger, Reeds. 

G. A.— (A-1) Lexington First (Jr.), Mills Home (Lockett), New 
Friendship (Int.), New Friendship (Jr.), Reeds; (B) Lexington First 
(Int.), Mills Home (Page, Grayson, Schell, Herring), Thomasville 
First (Jr); (C) Erlanger (Jr.) Reid Street (Int.), Thomasville First 
(Int.). 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



R. A.— (A-1) Lexington First, New Friendship (Jr., Int.), Reeds; 
(B) Mills Home (Gallimore, Judson), Thomasville First; (C) Er- 
langer (Int.), Mills Home (Vance). 

Simbeams— (A-1) Lexington First, Mills Home, New Friendship, 
Thomasville First; (B) Reeds. 

FULLY GRADED UNIONS 

Center Hill, Erlanger, Lexington, Mills Home, New Friendship, 
Reeds, Reid Street, 

SPECIAL MENTION 

New Friendship — ^A-1, fully graded for 9th year; every organi- 
zation participating in Hundred Thousand Club. 

Lexington — A-1, fully graded. ^ 
Mills Home— Missionary gift from every resident woman church 
member; W. M. S. enrollment larger than list of resident women 
church members, 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

Co-operative Program Other Objects Total 

1st Quarter $1,235.00 $ 933.41 $2,168.41 

2nd Quarter 1,162.80 1,168.50 2,331.30 

3rd Quarter 1,154.19 880.61 2,034.80 

4th Quarter 1,301.45 2,284.72 3,586.17 



Year $4,853.44 $5,267.24 $10,120.68 

Raised for Co-operative Program $4,853.44 

1942 Co-operative Goal 4,285.17 



Overage $ 568.27 

1943 Co-operative Goal $5,097.08 

Raised First Quarter, 1943 $1,308.29 

Goal Per Quarter for 1943 1,274.27 



Overage— 1st Quarter 1943 $ 34.02 

Hundred Thousanid Ch^— 1942 Apportioximmt $1,300.00 

1st Quarter $287.20 

2nd Quarter 338.05 

3rd Quarter 304.55 

4th Quarter 488.50 



TOTAL $1,418.30 

Raised $1,418.30 

Quota 1,300.00 



Overage $ 118.30 

1943 Hundred Thousand Club Apportionment $1,550.00 

H. T. C. Funds Raised First Quarter $561.76 

H. T. C. Goal Per Quarter— 1943 387.50 



Overage— 1st Quarter, 1943 



.$174.26 



38 MINUTES OP THE 



Comiparative Figmires Showiing Fiinancial Growth 

Co-operative Program Other Objects Total 

1938 $3,934.93 $3,341.97 $7,276.90 

1939 4,193.46 3,337.89 7,531.35 

1940 4,380.01 3,580.34 7,960.35 

1941 4,227.76 4,230.47 . 8,458.23 

1942 4,853.44 5,267.24 10,120.68 



R<evised Associational Standard of Exoellemce Requires: 

1 — ^Ten per cent (10%) increase in the total enrollment in the 
W. M. U. organizations during the year. 

2 — net increase of tenj per cent (10%) in number of organi- 
zations during the year. 

3 — Every associational officer and chairman a subscriber to at 
least one missionary magazine and the Biblical Recorder. 

Aims For IMS 

1 — In 1942 we just made the 10% increase in membership; we 
must work to enlist and organize new societies and Young People's 
groups. 

2 — Hundred Thousand Club and Co-operative Program gifts 
should be shared in by each organization. 

3— Community Missions need the best effort we are capable of 
putting forth. We can make and keep America Christian if each 
person lives as a "burning and a shining light." 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. L. S. GAINES, Superintendent. 

Mrs. Gaines particularly stressed the work with the Young Peo- 
ple, emphasizing the need for more leaders and a great sense of 
responsibility for Christian training of the youth in our churches. 

THE ADOPTION OF REPORTS. 

Announcements were made that payments could be made as 
follows at the noon hour: Expense Fund to Miss Beatrice Council; 
Burney Fund to Mrs. R. G. Jeimings; Edward Chow Fund to Mrs. 
Maverty. 

Visitors were recognized. 

Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, of Greensboro, representing the State W. 
M. U. Office, brought an inspirational message. 

Following an armouncement by Rev. N. C. Teague regarding 
luncheon arrangements, the meeting adjourned. 

The afternoon session opened by the singing of "O, Zlon Haste," 
followed by prayer by Mrs. F. H. Wall. 

The meeting was turned over to Mrs. N. C. Teague, Young Peo- 
ple's Leader. 

The Intermediate Girls' Chorus of Lexington First Church sang 
"Fairest Lord Jesus." 

Mrs. N. C. Teague presented the Young People's Report quite 
graphically— using a map of Liberty Association as a background. 

Mrs. B. K. Mason, Superintendent of Greensboro Division, spoke 
on "Our Unfinished Task." She brought a review of the State Meet- 
ing. 

At the time for the Memorial Service Mrs. R. L. Palmer reported 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



that so far as she could learn there had been no deaths in the 
membership of Liberty W. M. U. since the last meeting. Instead of 
conducting a Memorial Service, Mrs. Palmer led a prayer of thanks- 
giving. 

Following the singing of "What A Friend We Have In Jesus," 
the meeting held a business session. 

The following recommendations of the Executive Committee were 
adopted : 

1 — A Nominating Committee be elected at the annual meeting. 
This committee is to fill all vacancies that may occur in the Execu- 
tive Committee between annual sessions and is to be responsible for 
the nominating of officers at the next annual meeting. 

2 — That the secretary-treasurer serve as literature chairman. 
The Committee on Place reported that the 1944 meeting would be 

held with Thomasville First Baptist Church. 

THE RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE submitted the following re- 
port: 

The Committee on Resolutions on behalf of the W. M. U. of 
Liberty Association wish to extend to the women of Reeds Baptist 
Church deep gratitude for the hospitality displayed and the cordial 
welcome extended and the delicious lunch provided for us. 

Also, we want to thank each person who made the program pos- 
sible and to express our appreciation to Mrs. J. Clyde Turner and 
Mrs. B. K. Mason for their fine inspirational messages; also to the 
Girls' Chorus for singing so beautifully. 

We are grateful for the flowers, posters, and everything that 
added to the enjoyment of the day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. SPAUGH THOMASON, 
MRS. J. A. COX, 

MRS. A. G. Mccormick. 

THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE submitted the following re- 
port: 

Superintendent— Mrs. L. S. Gaines. 

Secretary-Treasurer — ^Mrs. C, C. Coppedge. 

Young People's Director — Miss Beatrice Council. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. I. G. Greer. 

Community Missions Chairman— Mrs. Reid Smith, 

Stewardship Chairman— Mrs. P. M. Hendricks. 

Associate Stewardship Chairman— Mrs. A. L. Snyder. 

W. M. U. Training School Chairman— Mrs. R. G. Jennings. 

Nominating Committee for 1944 — ^Mrs. L. J. Matthews, Chairman, 
Mrs. W. K. McGee, Mrs. G. S. Hartzog, Mrs. Alda Craver, Mrs. H. M. 
Stroup. 

The vote was taken by Miss Sallie McCracken. 

Reports were made regarding the collections of the Burney Fund 
and the Edward Chow Fund and the Associational Expense Fund. 

Financial quotas for 1943 were distributed for both Co-operative 
Program and Hundred Thousand Club. 

Following the singing of "Jesus Shall Reign," the meeting was 
dismissed by Mrs. B. K. Mason. 



40 



MINUTES OP THE 



PROCEEDINGS 
OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 
ASSOCIATION 

The Liberty Baptist Sunday School Association met with the 
church at Erlanger on Sunday afternoon, January 10, 1943. 

The meeting was presided over by Mr. C. F. Motsinger, the As- 
sociational Superintendent. 

The Devotional was led by Mr. M. E. Perkins. 

Nine churches were represented in the meeting. 

The subject discussed was Loyalty to Christ through Bible study 
and church attendance. 

After the discussion of the subject the program was completed, 
and the election of officers for the coming year took place. 

The following officers were elected: C. F. Motsinger, Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 5, Supt.; Rev. N. C. Teague, Lexington, Rt. 3, Asst. Supt.; 
Dr. W. K McGee, Thomasville, Training Promotion Supt. 

The following were elected Group Supts.: E. P. Woodleaf, Lex- 
ington, N. C; G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C. and Charles Lambeth, 
Denton, N. C. 

The following were named as Departmental Supts.: Cradle Roll, 
Mrs. Troy Jarre tt, Lexington, Rt. 6; Beginners, Mrs. Ben Carroll, 
Denton; Primary, Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington; Juniors, Miss 
Myra Olive, Thomasville; Intermediates, Mrs. John Brewer, Lin- 
wood, Rt. 1; Young People, Miss Texie Sowers, Linwood; Adults, 
Mrs. M. M. Smith, Winston-Salem, Rt. 6; Extension Dept., Mr. J. W. 
Dickens, Jr., Lexington, Rt. 6; Vacation Bible School, Rev. E. C. 
Roach, Erlanger. 

After this Goals for the year were set, as follows: Increase in 
Enrollment, 300; New Extension Dept., 10; New Cradle Roll I>epts., 
13; New Sunday Schools, 2; Vacation Bible Schools, 25; Standard 
Sunday Schools, 10; Churches having Training Schools, 25; Training 
Awards, 300. 

Adjournment. 

C. F. MOTSINGER, Superintendent. 
IDA C. NADING, Secretary. 

MINUTES 

The Liberty Baptist Sunday School Association met in its second 
meeting of the year with the First Baptist Church at Lexington, N. 
C, on April 2, 1943, in the afternoon. 

The meeting was presided over by Mr. C. F. Motsinger, the As- 
sociational Superintendent. After the Devotional and the transac- 
tion of business matters the meeting was turned over to Mr. Law- 
rence of the Pilot Mountain Association. He brought a discussion 
on and an outline of a Calendar of Church Activities for 1943, his 
discussion and outline was interesting and very helpful. 

Rev. N. C. Teague, brought a message on evangelism. 

MRS. IDA C. NADING, Supt. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call Since 
Our Last Session 



''In My Father's House Are Many Mansions, I 
Go To Prepare A Place For You." — John 14:2 



ABBOTTS CREEK— Mrs. AlUe Wall, Mrs. Flora A. Davis, Mr. 
J. L. Green. 

CENTER HILL— Mr. Benjamin Saintsing, Mr. Marvin Sechriest. 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Mr. Gray Baker, Mrs. Edith Bill Hill. 
CHURCHLAND— Mr. Robert Simmerson, Mrs. J. M. Green, Mr. 

Alvery Kesler, Mr. W. H. Barnes, Mrs. Flora Darr. 
DENTON— Mr. James J. Snider, Mr. Roby A. Carroll, Mr. James 

E. Bean, Miss Adline Loftin. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mr. J. W. Dickens, Sr. 

LEXINGTON— Deacon Henry L. Beck, Mr. J. F. Burkhart, Mr. 

N. B. Eggleston, Deacon J. H. Greer, Mrs. Turner S. 

Wall, Sr., Mrs. G. D. Mamil, Deacon O. P. Pickett, Mrs. 

N. H. Radford, Efeacon Ed F. Smith. 
LIBERTY— Mr. Eli Wall. 
LICK CREEK— Mrs. A. W. Feezor. 
MILLS HOME— Mr. Edgar Green. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mr. B. H. Longworth, Miss Elizabeth My- 
ers, Mr. G. A. Hartman. 
OAK KILL MEMORIAI^Mr. John W. Rumple. 
REEDS— iVIrs. J. R. Graver. 
RICH FORK— Mr. Monroe Stout. 
REID STREET— Mrs. R. S. James. 

SHEETS MEMORIAI^Mr. L. E. Grubb, Mr. W. L. Gallimore. 
SMITH GROVE— Deacon I. E. Lassiter, Mr. H. F. banning. 
SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Pearl Overcash, Rev. S. G. Snyder, Mrs. 
Kallie Hill. 

SUMMERVILLE— Deacon Frank Davis, Mr. Lawrence Bean. 
THOMASVELLE— Mr. G. C. Guin, Mrs. Carl L. Rudlsill. 
WALLBURG— Mr. George W. Wall, Mrs. George W. Wall, Mr. 
Owen Reece. 

J. W. DICKENS, SAM J. SMITH, C. W. WILLBANKS, 
L. E. RICKARD, G. E. MOREFIELD, R. C. WALL, 

Committee On Obituaries. 



42 MINUTES OF THE 



CHOIR DIRECTORS 

CHURCHES Name and Address 

Abbotts Creek Gary J. Davis, JHigh Point, Rt, 2 

Carolina Avenue Willie Gilliam, Box 20, Thomasville 

Center Hill , William Lohr, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Kesler, Lexington, Rt. 5 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton 

Erlanger E. T. McDade, Erlanger 

Floyd Rev. Howard Hunt, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Holloways G. C. Palmer, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Jersey R, L. Palmer, Linwood, Rt. 1 

Lexington Mrs. T. B. Spencer, Lexington 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, Rt. 2 

Lick Creek Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, High Rock 

Mills Home W. B. Lord, Thomasville 

Mountain View None 

New Friendship Allan C. Jones, Winston-Salem, Rt. 6 

Oak Hill Memorial C. C. Roberts, Thomasville 

Pleasant Plains H. T. Hunt, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Reeds E. G. Fritts, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Rich Fork William Lewis, High Point 

Reid Street J. A. Martin, Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Mrs. John Craven, Lexington 

Smith Grove Mrs. Adam Lassiter, Linwood, Rt. 1 

Southside W. L. Rule, Thomasville 

Stoners Grove Mrs. Glenn Miller, Southmont 

Summerville Ruffin DavLs, Denton, Rt. 1 

Thomasville Mrs. Alva Boyles, Thomasville 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Ray Owen, New London, Rt. 2 

Welcome E. L. Davis, Welcome 

Wallburg Mrs. Ben King, Wallburg 

Walters Grove E. R. Klass, Lexington Rt. 2 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



43 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

QRDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Name 



Address 



Church 



Work 



Atkinson, C. B. 
Combs, J. A. 
Cox, J. A 
Digh, D. W. 
Eddinger, C. C. 
Plowe, Thomas B, 
Gaines, Louis S. 
Gallimore, A. R. 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Hunt, Howard 
Jarrett, J. F. 
Kyser, R. L. 
Lanning, H. Otis 
Maier, P. A. 
Matthews, L. J. 
Mitchell, B. A. 
Mumford, E. P. 
MoGee, W. K. 
McMillan, J. A. 
Neilson, J. A. 
Newton, J. D. 
Philpott, Harry 
Reid, C. B. 
Sims, E T. 
Stroup, H. M. 
Teague, N. C. 
Williamson, W. D. 
Young, C. S. 
Young, E. D. 



Erlanger, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C, R. 6 
South mont, N. C. 
Thomasville, Box 124 
Lexington, N. C. 
Wake Porest, N. C. 
China Grove, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C, R. 6 
Linwood, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C; 
Thomasville, N. C. 
W- Salem, N. C, R. 5 
Kernesv'e, N. C, R. 1 
High Point, N. C, R. 1 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
U. S Navy 
New London,, N. C. 
Winston- Salem, N. C. 
Denton, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C, R. 3 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Lexington, N. C. 
Demin Sta., Greensb'o 



Erlanger 


Pastor 


Thomasville 


Retired 


Carolina Ave. 


Pastor 


Center Hill 


Pastor 


Stoners Grove 


Pastor 


Southside 


Pastor 


Lexington 


Pastor 


Lexington 


Missionary 


Walters Grove 


Pastor 


Floyd 


Pastor 


Center Hill 


Teacher 


Reid Street 


Pastor 


Lexington 


Chaplin 


Thomasville 


Retired 


New Friendship 


Pastor 


Abbotts Creek 


Pastor 


Abbotts Creek 


Retired 


Thomasville 


Pastor 


Mills Home 


Editor 


Mills Home 


Pastor 


Thomasville 


Retired 


Lexington 


Chaplin 


Taylors Grove 


Pastor 


Welcome 


Pastor 


Denton 


Pastor 


Reeds 


Pastor 


Lick Creek 


Pastor 


Sheets Mem. 


Pastor 


Summerville 


Pastor 



ASSISTANTS TO PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 



Hensley, Miss Ila 
Barnes, Mrs. Beamer 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Church Secretary 
Church Secretary 


MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 


Philpott, Harry 


U. S. Navy 


Lexington 


Chaplin 



PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 

No Chiiirclli Hats A Brotherhood 



44 



MINUTES OP THE 



TABLE V; MEj^'S BROTHERHOODS LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION, YEAR ENDING AUGUST 28, 1943 

No Church iu the Association has a Brotherhood Org'anixation. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



IJamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting- H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

3Bigr Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

2Pine Meeting H 
High Point 
Kernersville 
Holloways 
Pleasant Grove 
Denton 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefcy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stoke.s 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H.' Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J K. Fanf 
Henry Sheets 
R. T.' Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurg-eon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
fi. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



CLERK 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



45 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 

1942 
1943 



WHERE HELD 



SPiney Grove 
Rich Pork 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 

JPine Meeting H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wallburg: 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Hollow^ays 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
Mills Home 
Reeds 
Churchland 
Denton 
Wallburg 
Center Hill 
New Friendship 
Liberty 

Abbotts Creek 
Lexington 



PREACHER 



W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 

0. A. Keller 

1. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 

G. A. Martin 
E. P. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 

J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 

H. M. Stroupe 
L. S. Gaines 
N. C. Teague 

I G. Greer 

Dr. R. A. Herring 

B. A. Mitchell 



MODERATOR 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A, Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 

G. W. Miller 

R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 

H. M. Stroup 
H. M. Stroup 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 

Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



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Liberty Baptist Association 



North Carolina 



1944 



One Hundred and Twelfth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
Thomasville, N. C. 

September 5th and 6th, 1944 




held September 25 th «i 
ly Church, Rt. 1, Linwood, 




Liberty Baptist Association 1 



(CORRECTION: Page 3, Line 7 should read THOMASVILLE) 



INDEX 

Addresses: Cooperative Program 12 

Evangelism 17 

Grouping of Churches ^ 13 

Public Morals 17 

Committees: Appointed by Moderator 6 

Changing Associational Year 13 

Constitution and By Laws 31 

Directories : Associational__- 24 

Choir 25 

Church 25 

Election of Officers 14 

Historical Table of Association 32 

Map 2 

Map, Presentation of 7 

Messengers 23 

Minutes, B.T.U 29 

New Pastors Recognized 7 

Our Home Goers 30 

Proceedings: Associational 3 

W.M.U 26 

Reports: American Bible Society 15 

B.T.U __--20 

Education, Christian 14 

Evangelism 21 

Finance Committee 21 

Grouping of Churches 22 

Hospital, Baptist 4 

Literature, Christian 5 

Missions: Foreign 11 

Home 10 

State 8 

Nominating of Reporters Committee 21 

Obituaries 22 

Orphanage, Baptist 19 

Program Committee 3 

Public Morals 17 

Relief and Annuity. 15 

Resolutions Committee 22 

Sunday Schools 6 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee 17 

Treasurer's __- — 8 

W.M.U. _-J-_l 17 

Roll Call of Churches ... 6 

Sermon, Annual : 8 

Statistical Tables: 

1. Pastors, P.O. and Church Membership 34 

2. Superintendents. P.O. and S.S 35 

3. Directors, P.O. and B.T.U 36 

4. Presidents, P.O. and W.M.U. 37 

5. Men's Brotherhood (None) 38 

6. Clerks, P.O. and Church Property 38 

7. Treasurers, P.O. and Gifts to Local Work____39 

8. Gifts to Missions, Education etc. 40 

Visitors 7 



Liberty Baptist Association 



3 



Proceedings 



of the 



One Hundred Twelfth Annual Session 
Liberty Baptist Association 

held with 

First Baptist Church 
Lexington, N. C- 
September 5 th and 6 th, 1944 

TUESDAY 

Morning Session, September 5 th, 1944 

1. On Tuesday, September 5th, at 9:45 a.m. The Liberty 
Baptist Association assembled in its One Hundred and Twelfth 
Annual Session with the First Baptist Church, Thomasville, N. C. 

2. R3V. H. M. Stroup, ths Moderator, called the Body to order 
for the transaction of business. 

3. The Oper.ing Devotion was conducted by Rev. J. A. Cox, 
pastor of Carolina Avenue Church. The song service was led by 
Mr. Carey Davis, Director of Associational Music. The song used 
was "Come Thou Almighty King." Rev. Cox used Luke 17:5 as his 
scripture for the opening message. 



4. A. L. Snider read the Report cf the Program Committee. 
The report was adopted, subject to any changes deemed advisable 
as the meeting proceeded . 

Th program adoped follows: 



REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



TUESDAY MORNING 



9:45 
10:00 
10:10 
10:40 
11:10 
11:25 
11:45 
12:30 



Devotion 

Program Committee 

Baptist Hospital 

Christian Literature 

Sunday School 

Roll Call — Appointment of Committees. 

Sermon 

Recess 



Rev. C. B. Atkinson 



Dr. David C. Smith 
___Rev. C. S. Young 



Mr. C. F. Motsinger 



..Rev. J. A. Cox 
Mr. A. L. Snider 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON 



1:45 
2:0a 



2:15 
3:00 



\ 



Devotion 

Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions 

2. Home Missions 

3. Foreign Missions 

Address 

State of Churches 

1 Digest of Letters 

1 Goals for ensuing year 



Miss Minnie Hayworth 



... Mr. A. L. Snider 
Mr. M. A. Huggins 
.Rev. J. A. Neilson 



Rev. T. B. Flowe 



Rev. V. W. Sears 



-4 Minutes of the 



3:25 "Grouping of the Rural Churches for more 

effective service" Dr. A. Paul Bagby 

4:00 Adjourn 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Devotion Rev. C. C. Eddinger 

10:00 Election of OfRceis and Business 

10:20 Christian Education Rev. A. C. Lovelace 

10:50 Relief and Annuity Rev. N. C. Teague 

11:05 American Bible Society Rev. C. B. Atkinson 

11:35 Public Morals Hon. L. A. Martin 

12:00 "Evangelism in All Our Churches" Rev. J. S. Hopkins 

12:30 Recess 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:45 Devotion Rev. B. A. Mitchell 

2:00 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. M. C. Teague 

2:30 Orphanage Mr. G. W. Miller 

2:45 Training Union Mrs. Austin Sink 

3:00 Report of Committees 



3:15 "Our Churches Magnifying the Living Christ". -Rev. B. F. Bray 
3:45 Adjourn 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital 

5. The report on the Baptist Hospital was made by Dr. David 
C. Smith, of the Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem. 

After motion to adopt the report, it was discussed by Dr. 
David C. Smith, Smith Hagaman, Superintendent of the Hospital 
at Winston-Salem, and G. W. Miller of Lexington. The report 
was adopted. 

More than two decades ago the Baptists of our state endeavored 
in establishing the North Carolina Baptist Hospital, to perpetuate the 
spirit of the good Samaritan. That is they desired to care for those 
who suffer from bodily disharmony and disease, but are dependant up- 
on others to provide place and means for treatment of their unfortunate 
conditions. Throughout the ensuing years the institution has furnished 
care and treatment to a progressively larger number of patients annu- 
ally. To-day it is a great channel through which the Baptists' growing 
realization and acceptance of their Christain responsibility is manifested. 

Since the opening of the hospital in 1923 approximately 77,000 
patients have been treated. Of this number about 28,000 were of these 
for whom the institution was primarily provided, the charity patient. 
During these years the hospital has rendered, in most instances, free 
service to 1,650 ministers, missionaries and ministerial students. Last 
year, that is in 1943, 10,333 patients were treated. Of this number 
3', 444 were free patients or paid for less than the expense incurred. The 
free service for last year alone represented a cost of over $145,000, while 
this service for the little more than twenty years of the hospital's his- 
tory represents a cost of about $2,302,000. This cost was covered by 
one dollar per patient from the Duke Foundation, a meager profit from 
"pay patients" but largely by the Mothers' Day offering by the churches. 

The Mothers' Day offering this year to date amounts to approxi- 
mately $90,000, the largest ever. This includes hospital linen donated 
by the W.M.U. and other church agencies in the amount of about $2,000. 

Notwithstanding the recent expansion of all the hospital facilities, 
it is constantly overcrowded and unable to render prompt and needed 



Liberty Baptist Association 



5 



service to all who apply. Planning for post war expansion is under way 
and it is hoped that this situation, with the continued support of ou^ 
people, may be remedied. 

In spite of the increase in the national income, about one third of 
OUT patients are in the group that can not pay for hospital treatment. 
The institution continues to keep uppermost in mind always the pur- 
pose for which it was created, primarily the treatment of this group of 
patients in a Christian Institution. Fortunately, the hospital in coop- 
eration with the medical school, has a staff of physicians capable of 
treating almost any condition of physical ills. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David C. Smith 

Christian Literature 

6. The Report on Christian Literature was made by Rev. C. S. 
Young, pastor of Sheets Memorial Church, Lexington. 

Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Dr. L. L. 
Carpenter, Editor of the Biblical Recorder. The report was adoped. 

The term Christian literature includes: 
1. The Bible, 2. Books dealing with religious problems, 3. The publi- 
cations of the Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, 4. The religious papers owned and controlled or fostered by the 
denomination, and 5. Study Course Books. 

1. Of the Bible most might be said though little is necessary, it is 
the Book on which our belief and hopes rest, there can be no question 
about that. Perhaps the chief consideration in connection with the 
Bible is whether we read and study it enough. 

2. Books Ecclesiastes, 12:12 says of making books there is no end. 
There are many books dealing with religious and allied subjects which 
vary widely in their objectives and method of approach. The field cf 
reading and studying should be cultivated by every Baptist. 

3. The list of publications of the Sunday School board are inten- 
ded to help solve problems; the Sunday School literature, the B.T.U. 
literature and the Daily Vacation Bible School literature supply 
the varied needs. In addition, there are the Commission, the Baptist 
Student and many others. In fact we have furnished a full quoto of 
tools in which to supplement and clarify direct study of the Bible and 
administer the work effectively. 

4. We have in our own state two publications. The Biblical Recor- 
der and Charity and Children. There are other papers and magazines 
that help us much. These come from tae Woman's Missionary Union 
headquarters and tell of the mission work. To be a well informed Bap- 
tist People we must read. 

5. The study course books give our people an opportunity to equip 
themselves for service, the Sunday School study courses, B.T.U. study 
courses, the Mission study course and the General Study through other 
books and papers are informational and instructive. Therefore if we 
are to interest our people in Christ's work and care we must provide 
and use Christian literature. It is said a reading Church is an informed 
Church, an informed is an interested Church, an interested is an acting 
Church, an acting is a serving Church, and a serving is a Christian Church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. S. Young. 



€ 



Minutes of the 



Report on Sunday Schools 

7. The report on Sunday Schools was made by C. F. Motsinger, 
Jay man of New Friendship Church. Upon motion to adopt the 
report, it was discussed by C. F. Motsinger and was adopted. 

Jesus commanded his disciples "to go and teach all nations; teach- 
ing them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you." In 
2nd Timothy 2:2 Paul exhorted Timothy to commit the things he had 
been taught to faithful men who shall be able to teach others also. 
Today the church has committed to faithful men and women this re- 
sponsibihty. Each Sunday morning, thousands, of Sunday school teach- 
ers stand before their classes with the Bible as their text-book and teach 
as they have been enlightened by the Holy Spirit. 

We have just passed through another year of war with our young 
people continuing to be called into the armed forces of our country, and 
many others working in defence industries which hinder them from at- 
tending Sunday school. Due to these causes and a tendency to make 
excuses and relax on Sunday, which has reached new heights, our at- 
tendance has decreased. Last year we reported an enrollment of 6,668 
and an average attendance of 3,769. Today we report an enrollment of 
6,381 and an average attendance of 3,249. 

The time for our boys to come marching home seems nearer today 
than it has at any time. To what extent will they find us carrying on 
the work at home? Will they find an army of Christian soldiers march- 
ing forward against the great enemy-Satan and all his hosts? Will they 
find trained officers and teachers to direct this army as they have had 
in the army in which they have been serving? With this situation before 
us we recommend that each church in the Liberty Association put on an 
INSIDE ENLARGEMENT campaign seeking to enroll every resident 
church member, and that every church have training classes to train 
officers and teachers that they may be better prepared to direct and 
teach this army in the way rnost pleasing to our COMMANDER who 
is Jesus Christ. We futher recommend that each church have a Daily 
Vacation Bible School in order to do more Bible teaching to our 
younger boys and girls. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. Motsinger. 

Roll Call of the Churches 

8. The roll call of the churches was made at th:s time by the 
clerk. All churches excspt one {Taylors Grove) were represented. 

Appointment of Committees by the Moderator 

9 At this time the Moderator appointed the following 
committees: 

On Finance: Rev, Chas. Young, Chm.., Sam J. Smith, C. C. Wall, 

Miss Elizabeth Smith, and Luther Morphis. 
On Time, Place and Preacher: Rev. C. B. Atkinson, Chm., L. C. 

Carrick, Paul Feezer, Ed Anderson and W. S. Disher. 
To Name Persons to Bring the Reports Next Year: Dr. W. K. 

McGee, Chm., Horace Myers, Bob Carroll, C. F. Motsinger, and 

John N. Peninger, Jr. 
To Nominate Officers for Next Year: Rev. J. A. Neilson, Chm., 



Liberty Baptist Association 



7 



Mrs. Ausin Sink, Mrs'. A. F. Wafford, Hugh Miller, and 
G. E. Morefield. 

On Obituaries: Rev. J. A. Cox, Chm., H. C. Myers,, J. L. Ward, Jr., 

D. L. O Areas, and Caas. Leonard. 
On Resolutions: Rev. B. W. Sears, Chm., J. L. Briggs, Mrs. Paul 

Palmer, J. J. Embry, and W. H. Beusse. 
On Grouping of Churches: R. D. Covington, Chm., Fred Wilson> 

T. B. Mow, C. C. Eddinger and Howard Hunt. 
On Program: Dr. W. K. McGee, Chm., Rev. B. A. Mitchell, and 

R3V. J. W. D.ckens. 

Presentation of IVlap 

10. Rev. H. M Strcup, Moderator, presented to the Association 
a map, showing location of each Church in the Liberty Baptist 
Association. 

Dr. W. K. McGee made a motion to accept the map and 
record it in the minutes of the Association. 

Dr. I. G. Greer, Supt. of Mills Home offered to absorb the 
expense of the cut for the Association. 

11. Mr. Car ay Davis led the Association in singing "All Hail 
The Power of Jesus' Name." Offering for miscelaneous expenses 
cf the Association, amounting to $21.36, was made. 

Announceonent in Regard to Serving Lunch 

12. Dr. W K. McGee, pastor of the host Church, Thomasville, 
announced the plans to be observed in serving the noon lunch. 

New Pastors Recognized 

13. The following New Pastors in the Association were recog- 
nized at this time: 

Rev. A. C. Lovelace, pastor of New Friendship Church. 
Rev. C. V. Talbert, pastor of Smith Grove Church. 
Rev. V. W. Sears, pastor of Rich Fork Church. 
Rev. W. H. Connor, pastor of Summerville Church. 
Rev. J. W. Dickeas, pastor of Centerville Church. 

Visitors 

13-B. The following Visitors were recognized: 
Rsv. & Mrs. M. O. Alexander, Beauford, N. C. 
M. H. Kendall, Prof. Bible, Mars Hill, N. C. 
L. L. Carpenter, Editor, Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C. 
M. A. Huggins, Gari. S3c. Baptist State Bd. Raleigh, N. C. 
Smith Hagaman, Supt. Baptist Hospital Winston-Salem, N. C. 
E. C. Roach, First Ciiurch, Kannapolisi N. C. 
Davis Morrow, China Grove, N. C. 
Dr. A. Paul Bagby, Louisburg, N. C. 
E. L. Spivey, Charlotte, N. C. 
Rev. W. D. Williamson, Salisbury, N. C- 
. Rev. Tom W. Bray, Faith, N. C. 
Mf. A. E. Dean, Star, S. C. 

R. H. Sattarfieli, Meredith College, Director of Public Rela- 
tions, Raleigh, N. C. 
Mrs. L. G. Farmer, High Point, N. C. 
M. L. Ross, Concord, N. C. 
L. B. Olive, Missionary to China, Raleigh, N. G. 
Mrs. W. C. Reed, Kinston, N. C. 
Rev. Julian S. Hopkins, High Point, N. C. 



8 



Ldherty Baptist Association 



Dr. & Mrs. David C. Smith, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

A. W. Feezor, Denton, N. C. 

W. C. Reid, Supt. Kennedy Home, Kinston, N. C. 

Mrs. W. H. Conner, Central Falls, N. C. 

Mrs. R. H. Carrick, Silver Springs, Md. 

W. H. Johnson, Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. v 

C. O. Leonard, Rt. 2, Lexington, N. C. 

Annual Sermon 

14. The Scripture was read by Rev. N. C. Teague, Pastor of 
Reeds Church. The readings were from Joshua 7th chapter, 10-15 
verses. Prayer was offered by Rev. Teague. 

The Annual Sermon was delivered by Rev. C. B. Atkinson, 
Pastor of Erlanger Church. His subject was, "MY CHURCH 
TOMORROW." 

Adjournment 

After prayer by M. A. Huggins, State Secretary, The Association 
recessed at 12:30 p.m. to reconvene at 1 :45 p.m. 



TUESDAY— Afternoon Session 

15. The afternoon Devotion was led Rev. V. W. Sears, Pastor of 
Rich Fork Church. His subject was "EVANGELISM" , taken from 
Matthew 28:20. 

The song "There is a Fountain Filled With Blood" was led 
by Carey Davis. 

'Treasurers Repbrt 

16. Sam J. Smith, former Treasurer for the Association, made 
his report for 1943, which was adopted. 

REPORT of SAM J. SMITH as TREASURER for 1943 



Receipts____.____,.__^ $209.98 

Balance froni last year .48 

TotalReceipts __. $210.46 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Pd. Fred O. Sink Co. Printing Minutes $140.00 

Pd. Charity & Children, Printing Programs _ 7.00 

Postmaster, Lexington, N.C., Postage 8.70 

Pd. Helen Smith, Clerical Help 10.00 

Retained as my Salary-as Clerk_ 44.76 

Total Disbursements $210.46 

Balance Due Sam J. Smith as Clerk $5.24 

To amount donated to Association 
by Sam J. Smith 5.24 



5am J. Smith, 

Treasurer for 1943. 

Cooperative Program 

17. The report on State Missions was rriade by Rev. T. B. Flow 
The report on Home Missions was read by Mrs. Moore, same 
having been prepared by Mrs. Minnie Hay worth. 

The report on Foreign Missions was made by A. L. Snider. 
These reports were adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 
The money for the support of our State Mission work comes from 



Liberty Baptist Association 



9 



the following sources: Undesignated Co-operative Program receipts, 
W.M.U., Sunday Schools, Interest from invested funds, the Sunday 
School Board. It has been estimated by our State Secretary that the 
State Mission Funds will reach $176,750.00 this year. This money is 
used in the following ways: 

1. General Missionaries: Only one full time missionary, or associate 
secretary is employed at the present time, E. L. Spivey of Charlotte, 
J. C. Pipes of Asheville is giving part time to this work. Their work 
consists of organizing association-wide efforts of all kinds, revival meet- 
ings, schools of missions, pastors school's. Stewardship revivals, etc. 

2. Associational Missionaries: The Board encourages the associations to 
employ missionaries. As a rule the Board pays one-half the salary, the 
association the other half. Their work consists of helping all the 
churches in any way they can to promote a well-rounded program of 
activity. 

3. Aid to Missionary Pastors: This part of the State Mission program 
has been carried on from the begining of our work. It is perhaps the 
most important part of the work. Many of the strongest churches in 
the state were at one time helped to support their pastor's till they be- 
came self-supporting. $30,000 was allocated to this in 1944. 

4. Help on buildings and purchasing lots: What money can be used for 
this has been used thus far to buy lots and erect buildings in defence 
and war areas, in growing sections around our towns and cities, helping 
churches to relocate on main highways, and helping with building ad- 
jacent to state colleges. 

5. Christian Education in the Churches: The work promoted by the 
Sunday Schools, Training Unions, and Student Unions. The secre- 
taries for this work are: L. L. Morgan, Harvey Gibson, and R. T. Howeron. 

6. Ministry to other races: Our Convention co-operates with the Negro 
Convention of N. C. in helping to provide a part of the salary of the 
executive Secretary and the Director of Religious Education. Only 
about $2,400 is spent here, and perhaps no other money is expended 
more wisely. 

7. Ministry to the Sick: Included here are the Veterans at Oteen, the 
sick at the Western North Carolina Sanatorium at Black Mountain, and 
the Sanatorium near Aberdeen. We have a full time chaplain at Oteen 
and part time men at the other places. 

8. Pastor's Schools and Conferences: Three pastors' schools were held 
this year with a total attendance of about 450. These schools are a 
great source of inspiration and help to all pastors who attend and to 
their churches. 

9. Work Around the Camps and Defense Areas: Much has been done 
here but not enough. Emmanual Church in Fayetteville, and Sunset 
Park Church in Wilmington are both self-supporting. Two other build- 
ings are in process of going up, one at Carolina Beach, the other in 
Fayetteville. A full-time woi-ker has been employed for the Spring Lake 
section near Fort Bragg. 

10. Support of the Allied Church League: Our Convention appropriates 
$5,500 to this work which is being carried on in cooperation with a 
number of the different denominations in the state. Results here have 
been gratifying so far. 

11. Other State Mission Work: Southwide and State Radio hours, print- 



10 



Minnies of the 



ing of the Convention Annual, preparation of the second volume of the 
History of North Carolina Baptists, city missions (this in co-operation 
with the Home Mission Board), the study of the rural church program. 

The support of the Baptist Orphanage, the Baptist Hospital, the 
colleges, ministerial education, the Ministers' Retirement Fund and Old 
Ministers' Relief is NOT a part of our State Mission Program. These 
objects are supported through the Undesignated Co-operative Program. 

Though much good has been done, much still abides. Let us, there- 
fore, with renewed zeal and with earnest prayers promote and further 
the activities in which we are now engaged. 

Thos. B. Flowe 

HOME MISSIONS 

We have been informed by the Home Mission Board that it now 
has 514 missionaries working in 1,050 churches and mission stations in 
every state in the territory of the Southern Baptist Convention and in 
Cuba, and Central America. In 1943 these missionaries preached 36,000; 
sermons, led more than 12,000 to make a profession of faith in Christ, 
and received 8,200 members into the fellowship of Baptist Churches- 
Seventy four missionaries have been added since January 1, 1943. 

We rejoice that the debt which burdened, not only the Board, but 
the churches also, for so many years, has been paid. We hope that we 
will never face another similar indebtedness on our denomination to 
hinder the progress of our missionary work. Since the debt has been 
paid, our missionary program has been enlarged. In 1943 the receipts 
of the Board were $992,708.76 which is more than $225,000 of the of er- 
ings of 1942. The Annie Armstrong Offering amounted to $290,111.82. 

We have missionaries working among the Spanish, Indians, French, 
Italians, Negroes, Jews, Deaf, Chinese, Japanese, Mountain people and 
Underprivileged groups. 

Never have the Baptists of the Southland been so challenged by 
the task to be accomplished and by the opportunities for missionary 
service. The world now looks to America for Christian leadership. 
Southern Baptists have a great responsibility in furnishing sucii leader^ 
ship. The progress of the Kingdom throughout the world can be help- 
ed or hindered by the response of Southern Baptists. The Home Mission 
Board is challenged to help establish and maintain a strong spiritual 
front at home from which the gospel may effectually be sent to th© 
ends of the world. , 

There are many evangelistic opportunities in the Southland. Of a 
population of 45,000,000 people, about 20,000,000 have come i6 
tlie years of accountability without a profession of faith in Christ. 
There are 11,000,000 Negro, 5,000,000 foreigners, nearly 1,000,000 Jews, 
and 350,000 Indians in the territory of the Convention. The harvest 
truly is great and the time for reaping is at hand. 

May we all be faithful and true to our blessed Lord and Master, 
and do our best to help spread the Gospel, not only in our honieland, 
but throughout the whole world; until every nation, kindred, and 
tongue shall have heard of Christ our Lord. Thus fullfilling His com- 
mand, "Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every 
creature." ^ 

Minnie Hcyworth 



Ldherty Baptist Association 



IT 



FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

Since our fathers launched this foreign mission enterprise 99 years 
ago, we have passed through the war between the States, three foreign 
wars and are now in the midst of a global conflict. No man can foresee 
or foretell the future. We believe in the eternal and unchanging purpose 
of God to bring a lost world back to himself. To this supreme and chal- 
lenging task the Foreign Mission Board is wholly committed now and 
for the glorious and compelling century that lies just ahead. 

Today we have a total of 482 active missionaries and 90 emeritus 
missionaries. During normal times one-fourth of our missionary's per- 
sonnel are on furlough at one time. Due to world conditions there are 
now 242 active missionaries in the United States or in our country's 
service elsewhere. 

The Board has been active in relief work. Between Dec. 1937 to 
March 1, 1944 it gave the following: To British Foreign Board $200,000; 
China Relief $657,858.86; Purchase of Bibles and New Testaments 
$40,688.69; European Relief exceeds $45,000. Other emergency calls 
were answered. The total disbursement for World Emergency relief 
is $1,207,700.14. 

The support given by the Woman's Mission Union of the South has 
been wonderful. Many needed gifts have been made, but the Lottie 
Moon Christmas offering is the most outstanding. This offering up to 
April 1944 was $755,231.02. 

In Richmond, Va., the details of the increasing work is carried on 
by Executive Sec. Dr. Charles E. Maddry and a staff of thirty workers. 
Here is published the Commission; The Foreign Mission Journal. A 
great deal of time and thought is given by the Board in writing and 
publishing books to be used in study courses. 

Because of war conditions some of our faithful Foreign Missionaries 
are still interned. Some have been repatriated. There are others yet in 
the hands of the enemy and our people are called to pray earnestly and 
incessently that they too may be delivered. i 

The Board has under consideration the advisability of establishing 
a course of training in first aid and instruction in the rudiments of 
modern medicine for missionary appointees for over-seas work. Such a 
course would prepare a missionary to take better care of himself and to 
minister in practical ways to the people whom he serves. 

Conditions have closed the doors in Europe and the Near East, but 
we may take courage from 2ad Timothy 2:9 "I suffer hardship unto 
bonds, but the word of God is not bound." 

The sunshine of publicity has been turned upon Africa. There are 
great difficulties. Nevertheless upon Nigeria "the light of knowledge of 
the glory of God" has been shining with increasing power, transforming 
human lives and illuminating entire villages. 

It is still a time like David's. Like David, we must sing and lay 
up materials ready for the day when peace shall make possible the 
building of a great and noble work in China. 

Every opening door to the gospel has faced it's terrific adversaries. 
Latin America is no exception. The Roman Catholic Church claimed 
that we have no moral right to send missionaries to so-called "Christian 
lands." Our mi^ionaries have had great difficulties in securing 
passports. That is changing now and we are able to send missionaries 



12 



Minutes of the 



to Argentina and Chile. ^ 

We must continue to build on foundations of the pioneers in closest 
co-operation with our Mexican fellow christians. 

The losses in other fields have been our gain in Hayaii in that the 
Board has been able, to a greater extent, to supply missionary person- 
nel and to help in the acquisition of valuable properties for tha Churches 
and the Bible School. This has helped to put Southern Baptists on the 
map in Hawaii and has commanded the attention of the local people. . 

To the spheres of influence in which Southern Baptist have been 
operating must be added Russia. The gross godlessness is being burned 
out of the Soviet system and literally millions of Russians are stretching 
forth their hands to God. Baptists and other evangelical Cli,ristians arp 
now openly expressing their faith. 

May God help the Liberty Association to do its share in helping 
to .advance this great and needy cause. , 
Respectfully submitted, 
I A. L. Snider. 

DISCUSSION of ABOVE REPORTS by Mr. M. A. MUGGINS, 
SECRETARY of BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION ■ 

18. Mr. Htiggins at this time delighted the delegates i^ith one 
of his masterful addresses. ~ ' ' r ^ 

He suggested that our Missionary program had ih creased some (21% 
in the past year. Also that we would give in North Carolina most 
$2,000,000 this year. i 

He alsof 'suggested it^at in the year 1944 the people of N, C. will 
^end $25,000i,000 for, liquors, wines and beers. v el ; 

, He told that one-half of all the Chureh members in North CaroliTia 
were Baptists and challenged us with the responsibility. . r 

He told us the glad news that by 1;he end pf the year we woul4 have 
our State Baptist debt paid. He (Stated that the ^ext twelve montjis 
would determine whether or npt we would bave a program to meet( the 
needs of tomorrow. ■ , • ■ r ^r,^ 

The speaker pleaded ,,f q^-r. a greater missionary spirit amongj our 
Churches— chaUei^ging :|is to win a mil4qn souls to Christ. 

Report of State «>f tS^e Chiitches ; . 

19. This report was hrod^ht by Rev. J. A. NSilsdn, P&st6¥'-idf 
Mills Home Church. ' The report Was adopted als follows: ■ t 
Membership.' The <!^Hurehes'of our A5so(^iation' report 7397 membets this 
year agaiinst 7362 reported last year, a gain of 35 members, but w^'hatf 
only 198 baptisms this year as compared v^h 320 last V^^r. Seven 
churches report no baptisms at all. As a matter of record, it should be 
stated here that this decline in baptism is due partly to the fact that 
our boys and girls were kept from attending church and Sunday School 
most of the summer because of the quarentine imposed upon them by 
the State Health authoritees, growing out of the spread of Infantile Par- 
alysis in the State. Eighteen of our churches show an increase in mem- 
bership, nine a decrease and one, no change. ! Total additions this year 
amount to 323 as against 486 last year. i 
Sunday School. The enrolment this year is 6432; a loss of 236 from last yef^ar: 
Training Union. We have 64 Training Unions in our Association this yeat, 
a loss of 11 from last year. Eleven of our churches repoft no B.T.U. at all. 
W.M. U. The W.M.U. reports 99 organizations with 1722 enrolled. Six 



Liberty Baptist Association 



IS 



churches have no W.M.U. work at all. 

Gifts: (a) To Local Church expenses___$71,632.05, a gain of $4,217.23 

(b) To Benevolences 35,983.80, a gain of 5,657.03 

(c) To the Orphanage 8,525.54, a gain of 1,633.51 

(d) To all Causes -$107,887.88, a gain of $10,146.29 

26 churches show an increase in total gifts, 5 a decrease. 

25 churches show an increase in gifts to Benevolences, 5 decrease, 1 same. 
24 churches show an incrase in gifts to Local Work, 7 a decrease. 
16 more homes are receiving the Biblical Recorder this year, now mak- 
ing a total of 314. 

Gifts Per Capita: 



Southside $39.34 

Reid St 26.07 

Sheets Mem'l__ 24.77 
Lexington lst__ 23.87 
New Friendship 23.24 

Erlanger 20.12 

Oak Hill 19.55 

Wallburg______ 15.64 

Mt. View 14.93 

Liberty 14.26 



Denton $14.13 

Thom'viile 1st 13.45 

Smith Grove 12.70 



Welcome $9.94 

Holloways 9.73 

Center Hill 8.88 



Carolina Ave 12.58, Reeds 8.48 

Abbotts Creek 12.47iChurcLland 7.50 



Rich Fork 12.12 



Floyds 6.50 



Walter's Grove___ 6.31 

Lick Creek 3.94 

Sum.merville 2.£5 



Stoners Grove 11.44 

Mills Home 11.29 

High R'k Mission. 10.80 

Jersey 10.34 Taylor's Grove___ 2.08 

In the past ten years, our gifts to local work has increased from 
$29,149.68 to $71,632.05; our gifts to benevolences from $15,187.38 to 
$35,983.80; our gifts to all purposes from $44,337.06 to $107,887.88; our 
gifts to the Orphanage from $3,899.72 to $8,525.54. 
Goals. We suggest the following goals: 1. The rebuilding of the Family 
Altar in more of our homes. 2. More of our churches giving at least as 
much to missions as they keep for themselves. 3. A W.M.U. organiza- 
tion in every church in our Association, with more emphasis on our 
Young People's organizations. 4. The deepening of the spiritual life of 
our churches by constant, earnest emphasis on evangelism, especially 
from the pulpit and through the Sunday School. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. Neilson. 

Appointment of Committee 

20. Motion was made that a committee be appointed to go in- 
to the matter of changing the Associational year. The committee 
appointed was as follows: Rev. J. A. Ne.lson. Chm. Rev. N. C. Teague 
and Rev. W. B. Sears. 

Address on Grouping of Churches 

21. Dr. A. Paul Bagby of Louisburg, N. C. made an address on 
grouping of churches, making the following suggestions; That we 
need resident pastors, which would stimulate brotherly love in the com- 
munity; stating that the grouping of churches required a great deal of 
Christianity to properly succeed with the matter. He also suggested 
that fields where formed, have a group of field deacons. 

Adjournment 

22. Tuesday's session was brought to a close at 4 o'cock p. m. to 
reconvene at 9:45 Wednesday morning. Benediction by Dr. Bagby- 



The SECOND DAY— Wednesday Morning 

53. Mr. Carey Davis was in charge of the Devotional Song Ser- 
vice. The song used was "Majestic Sweetness Sits Enthroned." 
The Devotion was conducted by Rev. C. C. Eddinger, Pastor of 
Stoner's Grove field of Churches. 



Minutes of the 



Election of Officers 

REPORT of COMMITTEE to NOMINATE OFFICERS for 1945 

24. Committee heretofore appointed to nominate officers for 
next year, made the following report which was adopted: 

We recommend for: 

Moderator ^ Rev. H. M. Stroup 

Vice Moderator D. S. Hay worth 

Clerk and Treasurer Albert L. Snider 

Orphanage Representative Carroll Wall 

Chm. Executive Committee Dr. W. K. McGee 

Associational Biblical Recorder Rep.__ Rev. B. A Mitchell 

Associational Sunday School Supt Elmo Woodleaf 

Director of Associational B. T. U Mrs. Austin Sink 

Choirester Carey Davis 

Pianist Mrs. Carey Davis 

Alternate Mrs. Austin Sink 

Members of the Associatianal T B. A. Mitchell 

Executive Committee: ] C. V. Teague 

( V. W. Sears 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Mrs. A. F. Warfford 
Hugh Miller, G. E. Morefield, J. A. Neilson 
Committee on Nominations 

Report on Ciiristian Education 

25. The report on Christian Education was brought by Rev. A.C- 
Lovelace, Pastor of New Friendship Church. The report was adopted. 
This report was discussed by M. H. Kendall, teacher of Bible at 
Mars Hill College. 

He said that the college was one of the first Christian Junior colleges 
in this state. He challenged the Association with the question of when 
our homes and schools are Christian. He discussed the wonderful work 
that Mars Hill College is doing. 

Mr. Satterfield in a discussion of the same subject used as his thought 
"power." He stated that the liquor business was the dominating pow- 
er in the country at present. He said that the most dangerous men we 
have in power are those who have no Christian foresight as many that 
we have in office today. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
The term, "Christian Education," must mean that education which puts 
the principles and teachings of Christ at the center of the program. To 
carry out such a program there must be trained leaders in pulpit and 
pew to direct, instruct, and inspire. 

These leaders must be found in the home, in the church, and in the pub- 
lic schools, as well as in our denominational institutions. We should be 
extremely careful about the selection of all our teachers, both public 
and private. 

Money is always needed to carry on our educational work. The Wake 
Forest Chapel is incomplete. There are insufficient rooms at the Bap- 
tist Seminary at Louisville to care for all the students. My own son had 
to move out of Rice Hall this summer because graduate students can no 
longer be provided room in the dormitories. Our other schools are al- 
ways in the receptive mood for money and they need it. We should 
support the program for Christian Education. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. C. Lovelace. 



Ldbert%:]^ci(0ist Association 



15 



, i r, vM j) Report on Relief and Annuity 

y xy,2^y The report on Relief and Annuity wais brought by Rev. N. 
,,Ct Teague. of Reeds Church. This report was adopted by the 
Association. ''. <, < - . . .k ; , ■ 

The report was discussed by Rev. Teague. He brought out the fact 
thatjbhirteen, Pastors out of e^gh,teen ii^ the Association were in the An- 
nuity and that nineteen churche^^.,^out of thirty wer^^nrolled in same. 
,. ,,^t this time Carey Davis led the Association in singing 
"How Firm a Foundation." 

' \ REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

Our responsibility as individual Chri,§t^,ans and churches to support and 
relieve those who preach the G^pspel goes tjack to the ^ew Testament, 
to Paul and others. In-^n organized way Southern Baptists began their 
work for ministers when the Relief and Annuity Board was organized in 
1918. After 23 years, of splendid service we can i;ejoice with this board 
in its accomplishments and cooperate more fully to meet the opportun- 
ities of the yeafs,^head. , . 

Our board now has total assets of over $6,000,000. During 1942 the 
income from all sources which this board administered amounted to 
$1,383,000. There was paid out in benefits during the same year 
$629,000 to 2,900 ministers, missionaries, denominational workers, and 
widows of ministers. 

In July, 1938 South Carolina was the first state to work out with 
and through our Southern Baptist Relief and Annuity Board a Minis- 
ters' Retirement plan. Today — 6 years later — all 19 states; and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia have such plans. The District of Colu,mbia and Cal- 
ifornia were the last to put in operation a state retirement plan. A^out 
7,500 pastors (which is 64 per cent of our total pastors) and 10,000 churches 
(40 percent of tptal) are cooperating and participating in this plan 

In North Carolina we have a retirement plan with the Relief and 
Annuity Board which we think one of the best in the South. About, 45 
per cent of our pastors and 24 per cent of our churches are in this plan. 
In relation to other states we stand near the bottom. We must and will 
change this fact in the near future. , 

In this association we are glad to report that 12 out of 21 pastors 
with membjsrship in the association and 18 of the 30 churches are in this 
retirement plan. We hope for 100 per cent cooperation soon. Let each 
church and pastor do something about this important matter at the 
beginning of their new year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
; ^ , ■ N. C. Teague. 

Report on American Bible Society 

i 27 This report was brought by Rev. C. B. Atkinson of Erlanger 
Church. The report was adopted and discussed by Rev, C. B. 
Atkinson and Rev. SatterReld. ; ^ ) .irr '^ji 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

^ For more than, a century the American Bible Society has been ded- 
icated to the single purpose of widening the circulation of God's Word. 
It aids in the translation of the, Book, publishe3[it in more than 150 
languages, and distributes it in upward of fortyjcbun tries— never at a 
profit and often below cost. There is a hunger! for the Bible in many 
great areas of the world's life. If funds were available, the Society could 
effectively distribute hundreds of thousands;m;ore :\^olume3 of Scriptures 
in, such areas; . : .■..„! ^ ou ^.I.^j /' > , :/.„/x,.f'v .W'^-n 



16 



Minutes of the 



For almost three years now it has been the privilege of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society to distribute the Scriptures to men in prison camps 
and refugees in Germany, Italy, France, India, South Africa, Egypt the 
West Indies, Canada, and the United States. Distribution to March 1, 
1944, was 563,694 volumes at a cost of $503,926. The Bible has been 
gratefully received and appreciated. In two of the tamps the prisoners 
have voluntarily taken up a collection, and requested the amount that 
was received be used for printing of Scriptures for their fellow prisoners. 

The Society through chaplins in the Army, Navy and Air Forces and 
other key persons, distributed throughout the year to men and women 
in the armed forces, 48,193 Bibles, 2,254,045 Testaments, and 346,880 
Gospels, without expence to them. This brings the total of such issues 
during the war to 71,605 Bibles, 2,161,343 New Testaments, and 779,470 
Gospels. To these again must be added the provision this year of 566,661 
additional New Testaments purchased by churches and others for ser- 
vice men and women in their own constituencies. 

The most significant new department in this service in 1943-4 was 
the furnishing of over 40,000 New Testaments in water-proof containers 
for the life-boats, life-rafts and rubber rafts of the Merchant Marine and 
Navy vessels and larger Navy airplanes and the Flying Fortresses. Af- 
ter all, the thing the Society wants to do is, "to supply the Scriptures 
effectively to persons who otherwise might not have them." 

In 1943 the Amerscan Bible Society distributed in the U.S. a total of 
7,091,405 volumes of Scriptures of which 1,900,806 were donations. The 
distribution in the South Atlantic district of Virginia, West Virginia, 
and North Carolina amounted to 304,083 volumes. Since the Society is 
doing such a fine job placing the Bible in the hands of all the world in 
more than 150 different languages, let every church in Liberty Associa- 
tion send in an offering for this great work. Send the offering from your 
church through the regular channels to the Baptist State Headquarters 
office, stating that it is for the American Bible Society. 

Our greatest force for peace, is to give the war prisoners the Bible. 
Millions of people now learning for the first time must have the world's 
best Book. The American Bible Society is the agency of American 
Christians for meeting this need. 

The American Bible Society deserves your support because it is carry- 
ing a large share of giving the Scriptures to the peoples of the world in 
their own tongues. How fine it is to have the Bible in the home. The 
strength of a nation is the home life of its people. From the Bible mil- 
lions in our history have drawn courage, guidance and joy. Almost with- 
out exception, our greatest leaders have acknowledged the influence of 
a home devoted to the Bible and its teachings. In the training of 
children and youth there is for it no substitute. Here is what a small girl 
said in a letter about the Bible she received from the Bible Society this 
spring in the Vacation Bible School. 
"The Bible is the best book I ever read. It prepares us for a life ahead 
It is a guide we should follow every day, as we journey on our way. 
In this world of confusion, by studying its pages. 
We can find peace, joy and contentment through the ages." 
Just these words from that family that had the Bible placed in their 
home where the little girl could read it is enough to cause us to say, The 
American Bible Society is doing a grand work. The Word of God, em- 
bodied in the Bible, has become and is becoming so deeply integrated 
with the world's life that, no matter what may become of the institu" 



Liberty Baptist Association 17 



tions of man, it is evedent that "The Word of our God shall stand for 
ever." "The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God 
shall stand for ever." Isaiah 40:8. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. B. Atkinson. 

Report on Public Morals 

28. This report was brought by Hon. L. A. Martin of Lexington- 
He told the Association that "we are all in the liquor business, 

whether we know it or not." To prove this he said "our schools, our 
State Colleges and our State Hospital are being supported by money 
from taxes derived from sale of whiskey. In actual figures he said, that 
this state sold more than 66 million dollars worth of whiskey, wine and 
beer in a year. His statistics showed that we could have in Davidson a 
Church, school, hospital, library and play-ground each costing a hun- 
dred thousand dollars, then have 16 million in the state to spend on 
Wake Forest and Meredith if money spent for drink could have been 
turned in these channels. {No written report was made on this) 

Report on Time, Place and PreacEier 

29. Committee recommended the following which was adopted : 
TIME: Tuesday and Wednesday after the 4th Sunday in Sept. 1945 
PLACE: Jersey Church, Linwood, N. C. 

PREACHER: Rev. V. W. Sears 
ALTERNATE: Rev. Jesse Dickens 

L. C. Carrick, C. B. Atkinson, 
Paul Feezer, Ed Anderson, W. S. Disher, 

Committee. 

Message on Evangelism 

30. This was brought by Rev. J. S. Hopkins of Green Street 
Church, High Point. His subject was "Winning. "He said there were 
five thousand Baptist Churches in the Southern Baptist Convention which 
did not report a single baptism during the year and that the Liberty 
Baptist Association had six churches without a single baptism. He es- 
timated that less than 2 per cent of the unsaved people are attending 
church services. He said if we are to win, we must pay the price in pray- 
er and that we would win souls according to the way we prayed. 

Adjoyrnment for the Noon Hour 

Benediction by Rev. J. S. Hopkins - 



WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

31 . The body was called together at 1:45 by the Moderator. The 
song "I Need Thee Every Hour" was led by Carey Davis. The after- 
noon Devotion was conducted by Rev. B. A. Mitchell. 

W. m. U. Report 

32. The report on W. M. U. work was brought by Mrs. N. C. 
Teague. The report was adopted. 

This report was discussed by Dr. I. G. Greer, Supt. of Mills 
Home. He spoke on "The Youth of Today" bringing out the fact Jesus 
taught by principal rather than by rule. "The safety of this nation lies 
in the youth of today, walking together for Christ in the future" said 
Dr. Greer. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
During the past year, 1943, Woman's Missionary Union of the Lib- 



18 



Minutes of the 



erty Baptist Association experienced a good year. We did not reach the 
A-1 Standard, as in 1942, but considering the unusual conditions, due to 
the war, we have much for which to be thankful. 

We give special mention to New Friendship Church for having been 
A-1 for 10 consecutive years; also Mills Home and New Friendship 
Churches have the honor of receiving a Missionary gift from every resi- 
dent woman church member. 

Woman's Missionary Union encourages the following: 

1. Individual and United Prayer 

2. The teaching of the Bible and World Missions 

3. Giving of Tithes and Offerings 

4. Missionary Education of Young People 

5. Cummunity Missions 

As we seek to follow these aims we note that 87 organizations took 
part in the week of Prayer for Home Missions — 78 organizations had a 
part in the week of Prayer for State Missions, and 83 organizations had 
a part in the week of Prayer for Foreign Missions. More of our women 
are finding strength for these days in observing the hour of Prayer. 

In the field of Mission Study there has been more Bible Study; .also 
books on Stewardship, State, Home and Foreign Missions, and Commun- 
ity Missions. 130 Mission Study classes were held with an enrollment of 
1,233. Two schools of Missions were held. 

There is a widespread and deeply felt conviction that our direst need 
is a great, genuine stewardship revival. Not a revival of singing and 
preaching only, put one that will reach mind, heart and life, and will 
actually open the pocketbook. In our Liberty Association there has been 
a substantial increase in the number of tithers. 

From a financial standpoint we have gone forward in a remarkable 



way. The 1943 gift to Special Offerings were: 

Annie Armstrong Home Mission Offering $ 530.98 

Heck Memorial Offering 303.56 

State Mission Offering 458.89 

Lottie Moon Foreign Mission Offering 1,021.34 

Total____$2,314.77 

This represents an increase of nearly 300 per cent over last year. 

Gifts to Cooperative Program $ 5,316.37 

Gifts to the Hundred Thousand Club 1,849.40 

Gifts to Other Objects 1,915.68 

Total Gifts to all Objects $11,396.22 



I wish that I might speak in the same terms of our enrollment, but 
here we have suffered a loss of 324 members. This is due to the restric- 
tions on gasoline, and to the larger employment of women in industry, 
both in our association and at a distance. In many instances our young 
people have suffered for lack of leadership. Therefore we have made 
special efforts during the year for the young people. 

In August, under the consecrated leadership of Miss Beatrice Coun- 
cil a Young People's Rally was held at Mills Home Church. 

In October Miss Mary Christian visited our association in the inter- 
est of the Business Woman's Circle. 

In November the Divisional Royal Ambassador Conclave was held 
at the First Church, Lexington. I. J. Bishop, Southwide R. A. Sec. was 
present and won the hearts of our boys. 

The Community Mission report reveals an increase in number of 
community surveys, number of cottage prayer meetings, the reaching of 
more unsaved, and in ministering to our men in service. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



19 



The theme for our annual meeting this spring was "Face Today- 
Plan for Tomorrow." As we face today we see many organizations, both 
good and bad bidding for our young people. Should not each match 
this outside call by fostering junior organizations? As we Plan for To- 
morrow we want to make special efforts to encourage every church in 
our Association to provide organizations for boys and girls of all ages. 
The children of today will be the men and women of tomorrow. So may 
we realize our opportunities and "Take our children for Missions today 
so we CAN take the world for Christ Tomorrow." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. N. C. Teague. 

Orphanage Report 

33. This report was brought by G. W. Miller and presented by 
Sam J. Smith and adopted without reading, to save time. This re- 
port was discussed by Rev. W. C. Reid of Kennedy Home, useing 
as his theme Luke 1:66, "What manner of child shall this be"? 
This was a masterful message. 

The object of the orphanage is the support, caring for and training 
of dependent children. There are two officials of the orphanage, a general 
superintendent and a treasurer. The institution is controlled by a board 
of trustees who are elected by the Baptist State Convention. The 
trustees elect the general superintendent and the treasurer. 

The Baptists maintain two homes, the Mills Home in Thomasville, 
and the Kennedy Home near Kinston. Each home has a superintendent. 
Miss Sarah E. Elmore is superintendent at Mills Home, and Rev. W.C. 
Reed is superintendent of Kennedy Home. The finances of both homes 
are handled by the general treasurer at Thomasville. 

Mrs. Louise L. Blake is director of the Social Service Department 
and receives all applications for the admission of children. After an in- 
vestigation she makes recommendations to the general superintendent 
who makes the final decision. If a child is accepted he places it in the 
home best suited to its needs. If it seems best, he places the child in a 
boarding home or establishes a mothers aid home. The orphanage cared 
for during 1943, 698 children in the two homes, 23 in boarding homes and 
60 in their own homes. It has been able to place a larger number than 
ever before; thus enabling it to be of service to more children. The at- 
tendance in school reached almost 99 per cent due to the general good 
health of the children, and the almost total absence of contagious diseases. 

As a result of good food, regular hours, and the cooperation of all 
workers, the health of the children is far above that of the outside pop- 
ulation. Many activities are involved in the production of food. On the 
farms vegetables are produced in abundence. Much pork and beef is 
grown, and dairy supplies each child with a quart of milk daily. The 
poultry yard produces chickens and eggs sufficient to meet all needs. All 
surplus products are cured, dried or canned for winter comsumption. 
In addition hundreds of jars of canned fruits and vegetables are sent in 
by friends from all over the state of North Carolina each year. All these 
are distributed among the 19 kitchens at the two homes where they are 
used to prepare well balanced meals under the supervision of trained 
workers. Clothing to a great extent is made by the children with the aid 
of a competent supervisor. More than 10,000 pieces pass through two 
laundries each week. The greater part of this work is done by the girls. 

The physical education program goes on the year round with trained 



20 



Minutes of the 



directors in charge. A graded Sunday School, B.T.U. and W.M.U. at 
both Kennedy and Mills Home help in rounding out the lives of the 
boys and girls. "Charity and Children" is published each week at Mills 
Home and covers the activities of the entire orphanage. Along with 
the paper a profitable commercial printing shop is maintained and a 
large number of our boys are trained there. 

On account of the increased cost of living the monthly contributions 
and Thanksgiving offering should be larger this year than ever before. In 
the name of Christ whose love for the orphan child was supreme, and as an 
opportunity for enriching our lives, let us rededicate ourselves to the task 
of supporting and training the boys and girls committed to our care. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. W. Miller. 

Report on B. T. U. 

34. This report was made by Mrs. Austin Sink, of Liberty 
Church. No one discussed this report. This report was adopted. 

Training Union work in Liberty Association show some gains over 
the year 1942-3. 

The satistics given in this report come from the office at Raleigh and 
represents the reports that you have sent to that office during the past 
year. From our reports we find we have 18 churches with some form of 
Training Union work. Of the 18 organizations, all have directors. We 
have 12 Adult Unions. This is the same as last year. We have had a 
gain of 4 Young Peoples' Unions. Making a total of 14 unions. We have 
17 Intermediate Leaders with a total of 25 unions. This is a gain of 4 
unions over last year. We have had neither gain nor loss of Junior Unions. 
We have 15 Junior Leaders and 22 Junior Unions. The Story Hour has 
9 unions. This is a loss of 1. This makes a total of 82 unions. A gain of 
7 over last year. 229 Study Course Awards have been issued to the As- 
sociation since November, 1943. This is a gain of 122 over last year's 107. 
There is no way to determine the total Training Union enrollment for 
the Association until the Associational Minute is made up. We all real- 
ize there has been a severe loss in every church. 

The Associational Organization is complete and a very fine work has 
been done by our leaders during the past year. But we need to remem- 
ber that our officers cannot do any thing worth while without the coop- 
eration of every church. May we take this opportunity to stress upon 
you the importance of receiving your quarterly reports. Your coopera- 
tion is certainly needed in this matter, as we receive such a small num- 
ber of them. We would like to secure the help of our pastors in this 
problem. This information is so vitally needed in the Associational work. 

The Libety Association truly challenges each of us when we think 
of the 30 churches in our association — 18 with some form of Training 
Union work and 12 without any form of Training Union. 

TWELVE CHURCHES! Are we ready as officers, leaders, direc- 
tors, and individual members to say, "I am ready to give myself to the 
task freely without oeasing, standing steadfast and true until these 
chuches are reached for the training program, the aim of which is to 
reach every church and every church member and train him for greater 
service in the work of his church. 

Sometimes we are asked the question "Why have Baptist Training 
Union?" We might answer this question broadly by saying that the 
Training Union carries out Christ's command: "Grow in grace and in the 



Liberty Baptist Association 



21 



knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ." (2 Peter 3:18) 

Last year we set some rather high goals. We have not reached them. 
With a new vision of the work, a new zeal for the work, and a new sur- 
render to His will, we will go out in a way we have never gone before. 
Be strong members of your church. "Be ye doers of the word." Will 
we accept the challenge of these twelve churches, keeping all of them in 
our minds, our prayers, and in our work? In Isaiah 54:2 we find "En- 
large the place of thy tent; and let them stretch forth the curtain of 
thine habitation: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy 
stakes." We have great possibilities and can make this a progressive 
year, if we "have a mind to work." Let us see the need and prepare for 
a bountiful harvest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Atistin Sink. 

Report of Finance Committee 

35. The following recommendation was made and adopted. 

1 st We have carefully audited the report of Sam J, Smith as Treas- 
urer of the Association for 1943. We find his receipts and disbursements 
exactly as reported in his report of receipts and disbursements. 

2 nd Since it will cost more to print the minutes this year than it 
did last year, we recommend that each church increase its minute fund 
to at least 4 per member; and if they have not already paid this much 
they take an additional collection and forward it to the Clerk of the 
Association. 

Rev. Chas. S. Young, 
Elizabeth Smith, Luther Marphis, 

Committee. 

Report on Evangelism 

36. This report was brought by Rev. A. C. Lovelace and 
Mrs. Beamer Barnes. The report was adopted. 

We, the committee on Evangelism recommend: 

1. That each church in the association through its deacons and a band 
of personal service workers go over the church roll and visit those 
not active in the work, thus starting a revival within the church. 
Then follow up with evangelism for the lost of the community. 

2. Actually use the EVANGELISM POINT on the Standard of Excel- 
lence in the Sunday School, with the pastor and Sunday School sup- 
erintendent leading in this effort. 

3. Since only two of your committee named were present, we wish to 
add to this committee: Bro. Stroup, our moderator, Bro. J. A. Neilson 
and Bro. C. B. Atkinson. 

4. Any church needing help in securing outside assistance for revivals 
contact this committee. 

Respectfully submitted 

A. C. Lovelace , 
Mrs. Barnes 

Report of the Committee to Nominate Persons 
to Bring tiie Reports Next Year 

37. The following recommendations of the Committee were 
adopted: 

Your Committee recommends the following persons to make reports 
on the following objects of our work at our Associational meeting in 1945 



22 



Minutes of the 



Christian Literature _B. A. Mitchell 
Baptist HospitaL^Mrs. Ben Carroll 
State Missions-- Mrs. J. B. Powell 
Home Missions- -Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 
Foreign Missions W. H. Conner 



Music. W. B. Lord 

Public Morals Jesse W. Dickens 

American Bible Society _F. A. Maier 

Sunday School Elmo Woodleaf 

Training Union.- -Mrs. Austin Sink 

Christian Education. C.C.Eddinger W. M. U Mrs. N. C.Teague 

Relief & Annuity B'd.Sam J. Smith State of Churches N. C. Teague 

Orphanage Mrs. I. P. Frazier 

W. K. McGee, Horace Myers, Boh Carroll, 

C. F. Motsinger, John N. Penninger, Jr. 

Committee. 

Report on Grouping of Churches 

38. The report was adoped. The Committee reported as follows: 
We the Committee on grouping of churches, report as follows: At 

the present time we do not see any thing that can be done to improve 
the present grouping of churches in the Association. We do, however* 
recommend that a Committee of 3 be appointed to serve through the year, 
and render whatever service they can in this matter. We recommend 
that the following serve on this Committee, V.W. Sears, Chm,,W. K- 
McGee, Mrs. Fred Wilson. In regard to Associational Missionaries this 
Committee to bring report on possibilities of working with some adjoin- 
ing Association. 

Thos. B. Flowe, Howard Haret, 
Clydv C. Edinger. 

Committee. 

Report of Committee on Obituaries 

39. The Association stood in honor of the members, who have 
died during the year. 

The list was read by J. A. Cox. After the reading of the names, 
prayer was offered by Dr. I. G. Greer. 

{See Index for page number of Our Home Goers) 

Report on Resolutions Committee 

40. The following resolution was offered and adopted: 
Be it resolved that: 

This Association express its deepest appreciation to the First Bap- 
tist Church, Thomasville, for the hearty welcome received by the mes- 
sengers and for the hospitality which the pastor and his people extended 
to every one by attending to the comfort and needs of one and all. 

V. W. Sears, J. L. Briggs, 
Mrs. Paul Palmer, J. J. Emhry, W. H. Bussel, 

Committee. 

Closing Message 

41. Rev. B. F. Bray, now a resident of Thomasville, brought 
the closing message. His subject was, "Our Churches Magnifying 
the Living Christ." He stressed the fact that we need more confidence 
in our leaders in churches, schools, and colleges. He also pointed out 
the fact that no one in our Churches, as individuals, has any authority 
to take any leadership unless so directed by the Church. He said 
"before you criticise, pray." 

42. The closing prayer of the Association was offered by 
Dr. W. K. McGee, pastor of Thomasville First Church. 

ADJOURNMENT 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, A. L. Snider, 

Moderator. Clerk. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



23 



f^essengers to Association 

Abbotts Creek— Mrs. Ruth Spurgeon, Mr.&Mrs. John Spurgeon, Mrs. B.J. Hay- 
worth, Miss Lucille Hayworth, Mr. & Mrs. Carey Davis, Mrs. Roy Hayworth, Miss Eliza- 
beth Hayworth, Mrs. WiUie Bodenheimer, Mr. & Mrs. A. M. Bodenheimer, B. A. Mitchel, 
Mrs. Nina Hayworth, Mrs. I. S. Hayworth, D. S. Hayworth, Mrs. W. C. Motsinger, Mrs. 
D. E. Warner, Mrs. Laura Moore, Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Green, Clarence F. Moore, Mrs. C. H. 
Bodenheimer, Miss Bess Wheeler. 

Carolina AVENUE—Mrs. J. J. Carrick, Rev. J. A. Cox, Vernelle Gillium, Mrs. Mc- 
Caskill, Mrs.H. D. Bradshaw. 

Center Hill— Mrs. Lloyd Owen, Troy Jarrett, Mrs. J. P. Lopp, John F. Jarret, Hazel 
Jarrett, Magdalene Jarrett, Rev. J. W. Dickens, Mary Hunter Miller, Ehzabeth Owens, 
D. O. Jarrett. 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. R.G. Snider, LenaRickard, Mr.&Mrs. L.E.Rickard, Mrs. Glenn 
Barnes. 

Denton— Mr.&Mrs. H. M. Stroup, Mrs. Ben Carroll, Robert C. Carroll, A. L.Snider, 

Mrs. V. K. Skeen, R. C. Wall, W. R. Snider. 
ERL ANGER— Mrs. I. L. Koontz, Mrs. J. B. Powell, Rev. C. B. Atkinson, Lola Atkinson. 
Floyd— D. L. Owen, Mrs. Maggie Floyd. 

Hollow AYS— G. C. Palmer, Geo. C. Workman, Grace Palmer, Mrs. Hugh Palmer. 

High Rock Mission— Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Davis. 

Jersey— Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Roach, Mr. & Mrs. S. A. Sharp, Mrs. J. N. Penninger, Mrs- 
C. A.Smith, Sarah Penninger, Mrs. W. L. Smith, Elizabeth Smith, Mrs. R. A. Tate. 

Lexington— G. W. Miller, Mr. & Mrs. Sam J. Smith, P. A. Myers, Miss Bessie Goss, 
Miss Roxie Sheets, Helen Smith, Polly Stokes, L. A. Martin. 

Liberty— Mr. & Mrs. D. F. Hu'jjhes, Mr. & Mrs. E. F. Kennedy, Mrs. Bessie Kindley, 
Mrs. A. E. White, Mr. & Mrs. Haywood Lambeth, Mrs. Ausrin Sink, Mrs. W. L.Hepler,' 
Mrs. Lina Buie, Mrs. Clifford Lambeth, Mrs. Sam Pierce, Mrs. Dolon Dennis. 

Lick Creek— Mr. & Mrs. David A. Kenney, Earnest Wall, Mrs. A. L. Bean, PoUyFeezer, 
Sadie Cole, Carrie Cole, Ruth Cole, Paul Feezer, Henry McDowell. 

Mills Home— C. C. McKoin, Dr. &Mrs. I. G. Greer, Rev. J. A. Neilson, Mary Hedge- 
cock, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Romulus Skaggs, Miss Sallie McCracken, Miss Sarah E.Elmore. 

Mountain View — Mrs. Cuther Carrick, Essie Parker, Lucy Carrick, Julie Carrick. 

New Friendship— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Rev. & Mrs. A. C. Lovelace, Florence Mot- 
singer, Mr. & Mrs. C. F. Motinger, Mrs. Geo. Nading, Mrs. Farris Swaim. 

Oak Hill Memorial— Mrs. C. C. Beck, Mrs. Raymond Underwood, Mrs. Carl 
Trotter, C. C. Roberts. 

PLEATANT Plains— Mrs. Mary Jane Garner, Mrs. Raymond Smith, Mr. & Mrs. H. 
T. Hunt. 

Reeds — Mrs. Thurman Myers, Mrs. N. C. Teague, Mrs. Alta Craver, Mrs. Clyde Snider, 

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Morphis, Mrs. R. L. Myers Mrs. A. R. Craver, Luther H. Morphis. 
REID Street— J. J. Embry, Mrs. S. A. Reneger. 

Rich Fork— A. S. Everhart, W. W. Sears, Mrs. Sally Ordender, Mr, & Mrs. T. H. Small, 
Mrs. T. Everhart, Giloert Myers, Mrs. Willie Bowers, Mrs. W. M. Eddinger. 

Sheets Memorial— Mr & Mrs. Chas. Young, Mrs. June Snider, Mrs.Z.V.Fullbright, 
Mrs. Vestal Yates, Ed Anderson, Odis Frank, Mrs. O. G. Jenkins. 

Smith Grove— Mrs. Grady Clement, Mrs. Roy G. Orrell, Mrs. C. V. Talbert. 

Souths IDE— Mrs. Coy Hicks, Margie Epps, Julia Beck. 

STONHRS GROVS— Lloyd E. Lookabill. 

Su MMERVILLE— Mrs. Robbin Bean, Mrs. S. M.Surrat, Gladys Carrick, Mr. & Mrs. 

L. C. Carrick, Mrs. Will Davis, Mrs. W. H. Carrick. 
Taylors Grove — Not Represented. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Raymond Boaz, Mrs. I. J. Turner, M rs. W. K. Sounders, Mrs, 
C. L. Berrier, Mrs. E. A. Pegg, Mrs. J. R. Blair, Mr. & Mrs. B. F. Bray, Mrs. B. H. 
Barnes, Nell Loftin, Betty Rose Cranford, Florence Waters, J. D. Newton, Mrs. May 
Barnes, Mrs. C. R. Yarbrough, Mrs. J. W. Spoolman, W. K. Briggs, Jackie Ward, Danna 
Wright, Mrs. Mary Barnes, Mrs. R. S. Green, Paul Ward, Mrs. T. H. Thomilnson, Mrs. 
Argie Dickens, Rena Bray, Mrs. Alice Elliott, Mrs. Clyde Debose, B. L. West, Miss Wanna 
Fay Laws, Maurine Ferryman, F.A.Maier, Mrs.C. M.Howel, Mrs.W. K. McGee, Mrs. 
Wake Stone, Mrs.R. G. Jennings, S. B. Laws, Mrs. J. L. Ward, Jr., Mrs. B. L. West, Mrs. 
Ben Cox, J. A. Combs, Mrs. N.L.Bryant, Mrs. W. O. Poole, Mrs. M . L. Howard, Louoda 
Brooks, Mrs. Homer Beck, Mrs. Odell Blair, Mrs. May Matthews, Mrs. Paul Craver, J. A. 
Combs, Ruth Scraggs. 

WallBURG— Mr. & Mrs. J.W. Tuttle, Louise King, Mr. & Mrs. Maskey M. Smith. 

Walters Grove— Mrs. Carl Gallimore, Mrs. David A. Surratt, Mrs. E. P. Pierce, 
Mrs. John Yates, Mrs. John A. Gallimore. 

Welcome— Mrs. E. L.Davis, Mrs. C. S. Haynes, Mrs. Norman Pickett, Mrs. F. O. 
Leonard, M. L. Craver, Oscar Hartman, Mrs. M. L. Craver, Mrs. T. H. Mills. 



2k 



Minutes of the 



Directory of Association 

Oncers 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, Moderator Denton, N.C. 

Dan S. Hayworth, Vice Moderator R. 2, High Point, N.C. 

Albert L. Snider, Clerk and Treasurer Denton, N.C. 

Promotion Executive Committee 

NAME CHURCH , ^ ADDRESS 

Rev. W. K. McGee, Chm Thomasville "^....Thomasville, N.C. 

Dan S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek '. R. 2, High Point, N.C. 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill R. 6, Lexington, N.C. 

L. E. Rickard Churchland R. 1, Linwood, N.C. 

R. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue Thomasville, N.C. 

A. L. Snider Denton Denton, N.C. 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger Erlanger, N.C. 

G. C. Palmer Holloways R. 6, Lexington, N.C. 

H. L. Palmer Jersey R. 1, Linwood, N.C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington Lexington, N.C. 

O. F. Hughes Liberty R. 2, Thomasville. N.C. 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek High Rock, N.C. 

C. F. Motsinger New Friendship R. 5, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

I. G. Greer Mills Home Thomasville, N.C. 

Jeff L. Carrick Mountain View R. 6, Lexington, N.C. 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial R. 2, Thomasville, N.C. 

F. M. Smith Pleasant Plains , Denton, N.C. 

J. C. Le:)nard .....Reeds R. 3, Lexington, N.C. 

Millard Wilson Reed Street 206 Green Ave., Thomasville, N.C. 

Willie Bowers Rich Fork R. 1, Thomasville, N.C. 

J. W. Byars Sheets Memorial. Lexington, N.C. 

G. E. Morefield Smith Grove ...R. 4, Salisbury, N.C. 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove Southmont, N.C. 

Edd Epps Souths-de Thomasville, N.C. 

L. C. Carrick Summerville R. 1, Denton, N.C. 

S, R. Laws Thomasville, Thomasville, N.C. 

Add Cranford Taylors Grove New London, N.C. 

J. W Tuttle Wallburg Wallburg, N.C. 

Joe Pierce Walters Grove R. 2, Lexington, N.C. 

M. L. Graver Welcome Welcome, N.C. 

D. L. Owens Floyd R. 6, Lexington, N.C. 

The Moderator, Clerk, and all Pastors of the Association being Ex Officio Members. 
(See Page 13 of 1933 Minutes) 

Associational Executive Committee 



Rev. H. M. Stroup Denton, N.C. 

A. L. Snider Denton, N.C. 

Dr. W. K. McGee Th jmasville, N.C. 

Rev. V. W. Sears Thomasville, N.C. 



Rev. N. C. Teague... R. 3, Lexington, N.C. 

C. V. Teague Wallburg, N.C. 

Re V . B . A . M itchell . . . R . 1 , Kerner sville , N.C. 



Associational Missionary, or other Paid Employees — NONE. 

Standing Committees^NONE. 
ASSO CIA TIONAL A UXILI ARIES 

W. M. U. Convention 

Mrs. N. C. Teague, Supt R. 3, Lexingtpn, N.C. 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Secy, and Treas. . Thomas wille, N.C. 

Miss Betrice Council, Young People's Director Thomasville, N.C. 

(See Index for page number of 1944 Annual Meeting Proceedings.) 

Sunday School Convention 

Elmo Woodleaf, General Supt Thomasville, N.C . 

Mrs. Ida C. Nading, Secy, and Treas Lexington Road, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

(No report of 1944 Meetings made) 
B. T. U. Convention 

Mrs. Austin Sink, President R. 2, High Point, N.C. 

Miss Ruby Batten, Secretary Thomasville, N.C. 

Associational Represenatives of the Brotherhood — NONE. 
STATE INSTITUTIONS 
Located Within the Bounds of the Association 

MILLS HOME, THOMASVILLE, N. C. 
I. G. Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville, N.C. 

B. .W. Spillman, Chairman Committee Kinston, N.C' 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer Thomasville, N.C.' 

Officers Baptist Schools, State Boards and Institutions 

• (Residing within the Association) 

L. A. Martin Trustee, Meredith College Lexington, N.C. 

W. K. McGee Trustee, Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N.C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharp Trustee, Wake Forest Callege Lexington, N.C. 

J. A. McMillian Trustee, Wake Farest College Thomasville, N.C. 

C. C.Wall Trustee, Mills Home Lexington, N.C. 

J. A. Neilson Member General Board Thomasville, N.C. 

W. K. McKee ...Director, Biblical Recorder, Inc Thomosville, N.C. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



25 



Church Directories 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 
Holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association 



NAME 



WORK 



CHURCH 



ADDRESS 



Atkinson, C. B Pastor Erlanger Erlanger, N.C. 

Bray, Dr. B.F. Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N.C. 

Clifford, J.Roy Pastor Lexington Lexington, N.C. 

Combs, J. A Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N.C. 

Clark, J. B Pastor High Rock Mission Lexington, N.C. 

Cox, J. A Pastor Carolina Avenue Thomasville, N.C. 

Connor, W.H Pastor Summerville R. 1, Denton, N.C. 

Dickens, J.W Pastor Center Hill R. 6, Lexington, N.C- 

Dills, J.N Retired South Side Thomasville, N.C- 

Eddinger, C. C Pastor Stoners Grove Southmont, N.C. 

Flowe, Thos.B Pastor South Side Box 124, Thomasville, N.C. 

Gallimore, A. R Missionary Lexington Wake Forest, N.C. 

Hopkins, W. B Pastor Walters Grove China Grove, N.C. 

Hartman, O.M Pastor Welcome Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Hunt, Howard Pastor Floyd Lexington, N.C. 

Jarrett, J. F Teacher Center Hill Linwood, N.C. 

Kyser, R.L Pastor Reid Street Thomasville, N.C. 

Lovelace, A.C Pastor New Friendship, R. 5, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Lanning, H. Otts Chaplin Lexington Navy, U.S- 

Maier, F. A Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N.C. 

Mitchell, B.A Pastor Abbotts Creek R. 1, Kernersville, N.C. 

Mumford, E.F Retired Abbotts Creek High Point, N.C. 

McGee, W.K Pastor Thomasville Thomasville, N.C. 

McMillian, J. A Editor Mills Home Thomasville, N.C- 

Neilson, J. A Pastor Mills Home Thomasville, N.C. 

Newton, J. D Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N.C. 

Philpott, Harry Chaplin Lexington Navy, U.S. 

Reid, C. B Pastor Taylors Grove New London, N.C. 

Sears, V.W Pastor Rich Fork Thomasville, N.C. 

Stroup, H.M Pastor Denton Denton, N.C. 

Teague, N. C Pastor Reeds Lexington, N.C. 

Thompson, Zeb Not Stated Walters Grove China Grove, N.C. 

Talbert, C. V Pastor Smith Grove Salisbury, N.C. 

Young, C. S Pastor Sheets Memorial Lexington, N.C. 



MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 

Conrad Lanning Churchland Church 

Gilmer J, Beck Churchland Church 

Luther Morphis Reids Church 

G. E. Morefield Smith Grove Church 

Roby C. Clodfelter Wallburg Church 

MISSIONARIES 

Rev. A. R. Gallimore Lexington Church 



MINISTERS 
Ordained This Year 

Rev. Jesse W. Dickens ..'Holloways Church 
Rev. Zeb Thompson... Walters Grove Church 

CHAPLINS 

Rev. H. Otis Lanning Lexington Church 

Rev. Harry Philpott Lexington Church 



ASSISTANTS TO PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Mrs. Beamer Barnes Thomasville Church Secretary Thomasville, N.C. 

PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 

NO CHURCH HAS A BROTHERHOOD 



CHURCH 



Choir Directors 

NAME 



ADDRESS 



Abbotts Creek Carey J. Davis R. 2, High Point 

Carolina Avenue Willie Gilliam Box 20, Thomasville 

Center Hill William Lohr R. 6, Lexington 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Kesler R. 5, Lexington 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Clyatt Denton 

Erlanger E. T. McDade Erlanger 

Floyd Rev. Howard Hunt R. 6, Lexington 

Holloways G. C. Palmer R. 6, Lexington 

Jersey R. L. Palmer R. 1, Linwood 

Lexington ' Mrs. T. B. Spencer Lexington 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink R. 2, Thomasville 

Lick Creek Mrs. Z. L. Morgan High Rock 

Mills Home W. B. Lord Thomasville 

Mountain View None 

New Friendship Allen C. Jones R. 6, Winston-Salem 

Oak Hill Memorial C. C. Roberts Thomasville 



26 



Minutes of the 



Pleasant Plains H. T.. Hunt R. 6, Lexington 

Reeds E. G. Fritts R. 6, Lexington 

Rich Fork William Lewis High Point 

Reid Street J. A. Martin Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Mrs. John Craven Lexington 

Smith Grove Mrs. Adam Lassiter R. 1, Linwood 

Southside W. L. Rule Thomasville 

Stoners Grove Mrs. Glenn Miller .\ Southmont 

Summerville Ruffin Davis R. 1, Denton 

Thomasville Mrs. Alva Boyles Thomasville 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Ray Owen R. 2, New London 

Welcone E. L. Davis Welcome 

Wall burg Mrs. Ben King Wallburg 

Walters Grove E. R. Klass R. 2, Lexington 



PROCEEDINGS 

WOMAN'S IVBBSSBONARY UNBON 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The Annual Meeting of the Liberty Association Woman's Mission- 
ary Union was held at Thomasville First Church on April 18, 1944, The 
meeting was called to order at 10:00 a.m., Mrs. N. C. Teague presiding. 
The period of Praise and Worship was presented by the Mills Home 
W.M.S. Those taking part were Miss Sallie McCracken, Mrs. I. P.Fra- 
zier, Mrs. J. N. Thackey, and Mrs. D. G. Green. The theme "Face to- 
day — Plan for Tomorrow with Courage, Faith, Love, Vision" was 
very inspiringly presented. Dr. McGee led a prayer for those on our cal- 
ender of prayer, for our men and wom.en in our country's service, for 
their parents, and for a righteous peace. Mrs. Wakefield Stone brought 
greetings to the guests and Mrs. A. R. Craver responded. 

The reading of the 1943 minutes was omitted as they were publish- 
ed in the 1943 minutes of Liberty Association. 

The following committees were appointed to report at the afternoon 
session: Committee on resolutions— chairman, Mrs. H. M. Stroup, Mrs. 
I. G. Greer, Mrs. A. F. Wafford. Time ond place— Chairman, Mrs. S. O. 
Hinkle, Mrs, J. A. Cox, Mrs. C. A. Reneger. Nominating Committee — 
Chairman, Miss Roxie Sheets, Mrs. P. M.Hendricks, Mrs. J. B. Powell, 
Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, Mrs. R. L. Palmer. 

The roll call revealed 84 present with 17 churches represented. Each 
church gave a brief report. The following visitors were recognized: Miss 
Olive Lawton, China; Miss Kathrine Abee, State Young People's Lead- 
er; Mrs. H. A. Knight, District Mission Study Chairman. The annual 
report of the different standing committees was presented in the form of 
an original playlet — written by our superintendent, Mrs. N. C. Teague. 
This was most inspiring and informative. As a very fitting close of this 
Mrs. Alvah Boyles very beautifully sang "Are Ye Able". 

At this time an offering was taken for the World Relief Fund which 
amounted to $26.46. The Secretary was instructed to forward this fund 
to Mr. M. A. Huggins. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 

During the past year, 1943, Women's Missionary Union experienced 
a good year. We did not reach the A-1 Standard, as in 1942, but con- 
sidering the unusual conditions, due to the war, w e have much for which 
to be thankful. 

Special Meetings 
1. August 1 — Young People's Rally at Mills Home Church. Mrs. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



27 



Gilmer Cross, Young People's leader, Greensboro Division and Rev. 
N. C. Teague, Asssciational R.A. leader led in Recognition Services 
for the girls and boys. 

2. October 25 — Business Woman's m.eeting — Miss Mary Christian. 

3. November 12-13— Royal Ambassador Conclave at First Church Lex- 
ington, with I. J. Bishop, Southside Royal Ambassador Secretary 
present. 

Honor Roll 

W. M. S. Y. W. A G. A. R. A. SUNBEAMS 



New Friend. 

Reeds 

Wailburg 



New Friend. 



A-1 



New Friend. Int. 
New Friend. Jr. 
Reeds Int. 
Reeds, Jr. 



Lex. Xst 
New Friend. 



Mills Home 1st Lex., Int. lBtLex.,Jr. T'ville 1st 

Ist Lex. Jr. Gallimore, Mills H, 

Lockett, Mills H. 
Herring, Mills H. 



B 



1st Lex. 
C 1st T'ville 



1st Lex. 
Liberty 
1st, T'ville, 



Grayson, Mills H. 
Schell, Mills H. 
New Friend. Int. 
New Friend. Jr. 
Reeds 
T'ville, Int. 



Elanger, Jr. 
Page, Mills H. 
Sheets Mem. Jr. 
Wailburg, Jr. 
T'ville Jr. 



Vance, Mills H. 



Jersey 
Mills H. 
Reeds 



Special Mention 
New Friendship, A-1, fully graded for the 10th year. 
Mills Home and New Friendship have the honor of receiving a mis- 
sionary gift from every resident woman church member. Also each 
organization had part in the Hundred Thousand Club. 

Financial Report — 1943 
Co-operative Other 

ProgTam Objects Total 

1st Quarter $1,308.29 $1,257.74 $ 2,566.03 

2nd Quarter 1,340.15 1,088.68 2,428.83 

3rd Quarter 1,307.73 1,226.61 2,534.34 

4th Quarter 1,360.20 2,506.82 3,867.0 2 

Year $5,316.37 $6,079.85 $11,396.22 

Raised for Co-operative Program $5,316.37 

1943 Co-operative Program Goal 5,097.08 

Overage $ 219.29 

1944 Co-operative Program Goal $5,582.19 

Our Southwide agencies are free from dept. The next step — Let's pay 
our North Carolina debt. If every individual and every organization do, 
in 1944, what they did in 1943, we can lift the North Caroiinn debt 

Associational Standard of Excellence Requires: 

1. *Regular Asssociational Organization. 

2. Annual Meeting. 

3. Regular Meetings of Executive Committee. 

4. An adequate expense fund. 

5. At least one fall graded Union, 

6. At least two W.M.U. organizations of different grades in 

one-fourth of the churches. 

7. *Ten per cent net increase in total enrollment. 

8. Three-fourths of the organizations reporting on time. 

9. *A i^et increase of 10 'fo in number of organisations. 
10. Payment of financial apportionment. 



28 



Minutes of the 



11. Every Associational officer subscribing to one 

missionary magazine and the Biblical Recorder. 

12. Representatives present at Divisional meeting. 

(* Points we failed to attain in 1948) 

We have lost 324 members from our organizations; also lost our 
most efficient superintendent, Mrs. Louis S. Gaines. 

We have moved forward in gifts and in helping to pay the South- 
wide debts. Our Young People's work is encouraging. So may we, in 
1944, work with more zeal, remembering the words of Paul, "Forgetting 
those things which are behind and reaching forth unto those things 
which are before, let us press toward the mark for the prize of the high 
calling of God in Christ Jesus." Mrs. N. C. Teague, Supt. 

Miss Olive Lawton, Baptist Missionary to China, gave a very inter- 
esting and inspiring address on "China — it's hopes for the Future." Miss 
Lawton captivated her audience by her absolute sincerity and complete 
devotion to her privilege as she expressed it. We were glad she came. 

At the adjournment, a delicious lunch was served by the ladies of 
the hostess church. 

AFTERNOON SESSION— Young People's Hour 

After the devotion, an inspiring and challenging message "Today 
Molds Tomorrow" was delivered by Miss Kathryn Abee, State Young 
People's Leader. 

The Nominating Committee — Miss Sallie McCracken, Chairman, 
reported the following: 

Superintendent Mrs. N. C. Teague YoungPeople'sLeader. -Mias Betrice Council 

Associate Supt Mrs. I. G. Greer Community Mission Chm. ...Mrs. Reid Smith 

Sec. and Treas, Mrs. Fletcher Wall R. A. Leader Rev. N. C. Teague 

Mission Study Chm.. . .Mrs. A. S.McCormick Training School and Margaret Fund Mrs. 

Stewardship Chm Mrs. P. M. Hendricks R.G.Jennings 

THE COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS— Mrs. I. P, Frazier, Chm, 
We wish to express our appreciation to the members of the W.M.U. 
of this church for their hospitality as expressed, not only for their words 
of welcome to us, but in their acts and deeds as well as shown in flowers, 
special music and generosity at the noon hour. 

We also wish to thank our visitors and State workers for their words 
of inspiration. We appreciate the presence of tne pastors and ask God's 
blessings on all churches and W.M.U. organizations of Liberty Associa- 
tion for this coming year. 

Memorial Service was in charge of Miss Roxie Sheets, as follows: 
It is fitting that we pause awhile and pay tribute to those of our 
members who have passed to their reward since we last met. Faithfully 
they labored with us in life and we will long cherish their memories. 
"And their works do follow them." 

And as we pay tribute to our own number who have answered the 
call, let us not forget to include Southwide Stewardship Chairman, Mrs. 
Carter Wright, who has just recently been called home. Also I want us 
to remember one who labored with and for us for fifty seven years, Mrs. 
Sally Bailey Jones. From the organization of the W.M.U. in the year 
1 886 until her death she served faithfully and well as corresponding Sec- 
retary and Treasurer and, after the death of Miss Fannie Heck, she be- 
came State President of the W.M.U. In 1936, the Golden Anniversary 
Year, she resigned and was made President Emeritus. Her name and 
her work will be honored as long as there is a W.M.U. 
Those we have lost are: 

Lexington First Mrs. G. D. Howel Wallburg Mrs. G. W. Wall 

Reeds Mrs. Jeff. Craver Jersey Mrs. C. B. McCrary 

Thomasville First... Mrs. S. M. Waters Denton Mrs. Earnest S. Gallimore 

Mrs. H. A. Knight, in the closing prayer of the 1944 Session of 
W.M.U. of Liberty Associotion, implored God's protection, his love and 
a renewed vision for each church represented. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



29 



MINUTES 
Baptist Training Union 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Upon the resignation of Mr. Wilbur Lewis as Assooiational B.T.U. 
Director, the organization was left without a director. Upon the request 
of the Moderator of the Association a program was planned and meet- 
ing held Nov. 27, at the First Church, Lexington. 

Appropiate Praise and Worship was conducted by Mr. Carey Davis 
There were 70 present at this meeting. 

A committee to nominate officers was appointed consisting of Rev. 
B. A. Mitchell, Ila Hensley and Mr. A. L, Snider 

The Nominating Committee reported as follows: 

Associational Director Mrs. Ausitn Sink Sec. and Treas ..Lucille Hayworth 

Adult Leader Mrs. R. A. Allen Pastor Advisor Rev. C. B. Atkinson 

Young People Mrs. M. D. Woodleaf Chorister Carey Davis 

Intermediates Elizabeth Smith Pianist Margaret Ward 

Juniors Helen Tate Story Hour Stella Cook 

Special music was rendered by Carey Davis and Lucille Hayworth. 

The Inspirational address "TO THE UTTERMOST" was brought 
by Dr. L. S. Gaines. 

The meeting adjourned to meet Jan .30, 1944, with the First Church, 
Lexington. Lucille Hayworth, Secretary 

The Liberty Associational B.T.U. held its regular 5th Sunday meet- 
ing Jan. 30, 1944 with the First Church, Lexington. 

The Devotion was conducted by Rev. C. B. Atkinson. 

The Attendance Banner was won by Carolina Ave. with 42% present. 

A motion was carried that for the year we adopt as our goal to en- 
list in B.T.U. work the following: 6 new Unions; 11 Adult, 11 Young 
People's, 6 Intermediate, 8 Junior, and 10 Story Hour departments. 

The Reid Street Church, Thomasvile, invited the B.T.U. to their 
church for the next meeting. 

Due to the resignation of the Story Hour and Adult Leaders, Mrs. 
J. W. Byars was elected for Story Hour, and Mr. H. L. Banks, Sr. 
was elected for Adult Leader. The meeting closed with song and prayer. 

Lucille Hayworth, Secretary 

The Liberty Associational B.T.U. meeting was held April 30, with 
the Reids Street Church, Thomasville. 

The meeting opened with appropiate praise and worship, the song ser- 
vice conducted by Mr. Carey Davis, the Devotional by Rev. R. L. Kiser. 

The attendance banner was won by Southside with an average of 86% . 

A motion carried that a collection be taken for expense of director. 

A Nominating Committee; Rev. B. A. Mitchell, Chairman, Mrs. 
M. D. Woodleaf, Mr. Elmo Woodleaf, was appointed to have a report 
at the July meeting. 

The collection for expense was taken and amounted to $20.63. 

After prayer the meeting adjourned to meet again the 5th Sunday 
in July with the Erianger Church. Lucille Hayworth, Secretary. 

The Liberty Associational B. T. U. Meeting was held July 30, with 
the Erianger Church. 

The meeting opened with quiet music by Mr. and Mrs. Carey 
Davis and Miss Lucille Hayworth. 

The Devotion was conducted by Rev. V. W. Sears. 

The attendance banner was won by Erianger with an average of 379! . 

The Nominating Committee recommended the following officers: 
Director, Mrs. Austin Sink; Associate Director, Mr. H. L. Banks, Sr.; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Lucille Hayworth. 

Department Conferences were conducted by Associational leaders. 

The meeting adjourned to hold its next meeting with the First 
Church, Thomasville. Lucille Hayworth, Secretary. 



30 



Minutes of the 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call Since Our Last Session 

^ (So mo prepare ^ flace ^or Tgou." Slol^n 14:2. 

Abbotts Creek — Mrs. Alma Mumford, Mr. John Bodenheimer. 
Carolina Avenue — Mr. Joe Ingram, Mrs. Nancy Jefferson, Mr. 

Walter Evans (Died in service), Mr. Paul Smith (Killed D. Day). 
Cenfer /ff//— Mr. J. H. Rickard. 
Churchland—Mr. J. L. Alley. 

Denton— Mrs. E. 0. Lane, Mr. J. W. Cashatt, Mrs. Ernest 
Gallimore. 

Erlanger— Mrs. L. O. Bishop, Mr. W. Fairbanks Walker (Killed 

in action). 
Holloways — Mrs. Emmy McCarn. 
Jersey— Mrs. C. B. McCrary. 

Lex/n^^on— Deacon Chas. M. Wall, Sr., Mr. Oscar M. Stokes. 
Liberty— Mrs. Lou Stout, Mrs. Cora Bell Grubb, Pfc. Austin 

Watford (Killed in action). 
Lick Creek — Mrs. Eliza Owens, Mr. B. R. Kinney. 
Mills Home — Mr. Wilbur Spaul (Died in Service). 
Mt. View — None. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Sarah Alice Charles. 

Oak Hill Memorial — None. 

Pleasant Plains — Mr. Glen Hunt (In Service). 

Reeds — Deacon C. H. Fritts. 

Reid Street — None. 

Rich Fork— Mrs. Mittie Wagoner, Mrs. M.S. Clinard, Mrs. John 
Eddinger. 

Sheets Memorial— Mr. Roy Bean, Mrs. C.U. G. Biesecher, Mrs. 

C. H. Lovett. 
Smiths Grove — None. 

South Side — Mrs. Ray Eddinger, Mrs. Geneva Hunt. 
Stoners Grove — None 

Summerville — Miss Annie Cameron, Mrs. Dora Davis, Mrs. 

Minnie Shipton, Mr. Johnnie Bean (Died in Service). 
Taylors Grove — One dead (No name Given). 
Thomasville— Mrs. A. Z. Boles, Mr. D. N. Godby, Mr. A. J. 

Hudson, Mr. H. R. Kyser, Mr. L. E. Teague, Mrs. G. C. Waters. 
Wallburg — None. 

Walters Grove— Mr. N. H. Prevost, Mrs. W. B. Hopkins Mrs. 

Lessie Segears. 
Tye/come— Deacon F. 0. Leonard, Sr. 
(Seven, as noted, died Serving in the Armed Forces of the U.S.) 
J. A. Cox, Chm., J. L. Ward, Jr., 
H. C Myers, Chas. Linard, D. L. Owen, 

Committee. 



Liberty Baptist Association 



31 



Constitution and By-Laws 

(See Page 14, 1929 Minutes) 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "Thfe Liberty Baptist Association." 
OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this Association to furnish the Gospel (as we hold it) 
to the people within the bounds of the Association, and to co-operate with the Baptist 
State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of the Association, pastors of the 
churches of the Association, and messengers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to 
three messengers and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction thereof 
over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall be a moderator, vice-moderator, a treas- 
urer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the Association at its annual 
meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organizations, or as defined by the 
Association from time to time. 

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The Association shall elect an Executive Committee each year whose duties 
shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the Association, and to at- 
tend to all business in the Association between the session and to make such reports as they 
deem advisable at the annual meeting of the Association. The Association may appoint or 
elect such other boards or committees from time to time as circumstances may require. 
TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the first Sunday in 
September. The modarator may at the request of the Executive Committee change the 
time or place of meeting of this Association when it may be deemed by him not expedient 
to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may fill any 
vacancy occuring between meeting of the Association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the Association 
by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. This Association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for Parliam- 
entary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
Ordination of New Ministers 

(As recommended by the Executive Committee and Adopted by the Associatioon. See 
page 27, 1939 Minutes) 

1. That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examination and approval 
for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, an Examining Council be summoned 
by written invitation of at least one week in advance from the church nominating the can- 
didate, the Council to include the pastor and one member-at-large from each Baptist 
Church in the fellowship of the Association. 

2 That the examination of the candidate be conducted pubicly in the auditorium of 
the nominating church, and prior announcement given in good time so that all the brethren 
who wish to do so may attend the examination. 

3. That we ordain only those who have received definite call to become pastor of a 
Baptist Church in regular standing in its Association which church shall have requested 
his ornination. 

Organization and Admission of New Churches 

It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to organize themselves into a 
new church with the purpose of seeking the recognition of and the fellewship and coopera - 
tion with this Association, be requested to fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Notice shall be given to the Moderator of the Association of the desire to organize 
a church before any such organizatipn takes place. The Moderator will then ask the Pro- 
motion Executive Committee to study and pass upon the need of and the practicability for 
such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as not to interfere with 
the work or encroach upon the territory of the churches already affiliated with the Associa- 
tion.' This will be determined by the Promotion Executine Committee. 

3. Upon being approved by the Promotion Executive Committee the group will then 
request a council to examine the church covenant and the articles of faith of the proposed 
church. It is recommended that this council consist of three pastors and three laymen of 
the Association appointed by the Moderator. Should this council approve the covenant 
and articles of faith, the group will then proceed to be constituted into a Baptist Church of 
the same faith and order. 



32 



Minutes of the 



4. The new church, having been duly organized and constituted, may at the next annual 
Association present a letter to the Association asking far recognition and seeking fellowship 
with the Association, including with this letter a copy of the Articles of Faith and the 
church covenant adopted by the body, as well as a report af the work since time of organiza- 
tion as it regards all phases of our Baptist Program of Missions, Evangelism, Education, 
Social Service, Training and Worship. 

5. The previously appointed council of three pastors and three laymen will examine 
the letter and reports of the newly organized church, and will recommend to the Associa- 
tion its acceptance or rejection as the case may be. (See Minutes of 1941, Page 20.) 

Resolution in Regard to Program Committee 

The following resolution was offered and adopted: 

That the Program Committee consist of the officers of the Association, pastors of the 
entertaining churches and three persons, named by the Moderator during the session of the 
Association. (See page 31, 1941 Minutes) 

Resolution in Regard to Messengers 

Rev. W. K. McGee offered a resolution as follows, which was adopted: 
That the names of messengers printed in the minutes include only those actually at- 
tending the Association from the delegations elected by the churches. 
(See Page 31, 1941 Minutes.) 

Associational Executive Committee 

(The following was adopted at the 1942 session. See page 38 of 1942 Minutes.) 
Your committee recommends that: 

An executive committee of the Association be formed of seven members, including the 
Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the chairman of the exective-promotion committee, 
and four other members elected by the Association along with the other officers of the Asso- 
ciation: the committee to attend to associational business between the annual meetings, 
their actions to be reported to and reviewed by the Association annually. (This executive 
committee will transact associational business; the promotion-executive committee will pro- 
mote the interests of the Association and co-operative program as formely.) 



Historical Table of the Association 



Year WHERE HELD PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



1832. 
1833. 
1834. 
1835. 
1836 
1837 
1838. 
1839. 
1840 
1841. 

1842. 
1843. 
1844. 
1845. 
1846 
1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 
1851 

1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861 

1862. 

1863 

1864. 

1865. 

1866. 

1867. 

1868 

1869., 

1870.. 

1871 



.1 Jamestown Geo. W. Purefoy ...Wm. Burch Peter Owen 

. HoUoways losiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. Abbotts Creek Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. Liberty John Culpepper Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. Jersey Eli Carroll Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. Lick Creek Peter Owen :. Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier EH Carroll Peter Owen 

.2 Pine Meeting H. ...Eli Carr 11 Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

. HoUoways .losiah Wiseman Eli Carroll Peter Owen 

New Friendship ...Benjamin Lanier Gershom Tussey ...Peter Owen 



. Reeds X Roads Barton Roby Benjamin Lanier. 

. Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier. 

. Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner ...Benjamin Lanier. 

. Jersey Alfred Kinney Benjamin Lanier. 

. Lick Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier. 

. Abbotts Creek ....^..Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier. 

Reeds X Roads Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier. 

.3 Big Creek Azariah Williams Benjomin Lanier 

.1 Jamestown Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier. 

. Liberty Wm. Turner Wm. Turner 



.Azariah 
.Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 



Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 
Williams 

. HoUoways Z. Minor Wm. Turner Azariah Williams 

. Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier ...Azariah Williams 

. Reeds X Reeds Alfred Kinney Joseph Spurgeon .. Azariah Williams 

Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier ...Azariah Williams 

. Abbotts Creek Unknown Benjamin Lanier ...Azariah Williams 

. Reeds X Roads Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

. HoUoways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah WiUiams 

. New Friendship ...Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier ...J. H. Owen 

. Abbotts Creek Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier ...Azariah Williams 

. Jersey J, B. Jackson J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

. Lick Creek F. H. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

. Abbotts Creek T. W. Tobey I.B.Jackson Azariah Williams 

. Thomasville W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier ...Azariah Williams 

. No Session held On account of Conditions caused By Civil War 

. Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier... J. H. Owen 

. Abbotts Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier. ..J. H. Owen 

Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier... J. H. Owen 

. Abbotts Creek A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner J. FL Owen 

.3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm, Turner J. H. Owen 

.2 Pine Meeting H. ...W. M. Wingate Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 



Liberty Baptist Association 



33 



Year WHERE HELD PREACHER MODERATOR CLERK 

1872... New Friendship ...H. Morton J. H. Brooks ..J. L. Pleasant 

1873... Holloways Thomas Carrick H. Morton Thomas Carrick 

1874... Lick Creek A. F. Reid Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1875. .4 Muddy Creek C. T. Bailey Wm, Turner Thomas Carrick 

1876... Reeds X Roads H. W. Reinhart Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1877... High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1878. .3 Big Creek H. W. Reinhart H. W. Reinhart ...Henry Sheets 

1879... Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart ...Henry Sheets 

1880... Holloways S. F. C mrad H. W. Reinhart ...Henry Sheets 

1881... Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart ...Henry Sheets 

1882. ..4 Muddy Creek S. H. Thompson H, W. Reinhart ...Henry Sheets 

1883 .2 Pine Meeting H. ...O. F. Gregory H. W. Reinhart ...Hensy Sheets 

1884... Summerville S. H. Thompson Wm. Turner Henry Seeets 

1885... Lexington J. B. Richardson... Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1886 .. Abbotts Creek J: B. Richardson Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1887... Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1888... Reeds X Roads C. Durham : Wm. Turner Henry Sheets 

1889 New Friendship W. F. Watson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1890... Jersey J. M. Bennett James Smith Henry Sheets 

1891. .2 Pine Meeting H. . J. K. Fant James Smith Henry Sheets 

1892... High Point .Henry Sheets.... James Smith Henry Sheets 

1893... Kernersville R. T. Bryan James Smith Henry Sheets 

1894. . Holloways R. Vande venter James Smjth Henry Sheets 

1895... Pleasant Grove J. H. Hilliard James Smith Henry Sheets 

1896... Denton Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1897 . 5 Piney Grove W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1898... Rich Fork J. H. Lambeth James Smith Henry Sheets 

1899... Aobotts Creek S. B. Wilson James Smith Henry Sheets 

1900. .. Reeds X Roads W. H. Rich James Smith Henry Sheets 

1901... Lexington C. A. G. Thomas James Smith.. Henry Sheets 

1902... Lick Creek Henry Sheets James Smith Henry Sheets 

1903... .iersey .W.A.Smith James Smith Henry Sheets 

1904 . .2 Pine Meeting H. . Geo. P. Harrill James Smith Henry Sheets 

1905... New Friendship ...John R. Miller James Smith .., Henry Sheets 

1908... ThomasviUe J. S. Farmer James Smith Henry Sheets 

1907... Wallburg Dr. R. T. Vann J. W. Nowell P. S. Vann 

1908... Denton M. L. Kesler J. W. Nowell "...P. S. Vann 

1909... Liberty S. D. Swaim Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1910... Orphanage O.A.Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

19li... Abbotts Creek G.A.Martin Henry Sheets ..P. S. Vann 

1912... Stoners Grove O.A.Keller Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1913... Rich Fork M. L. Kesler Henry Sheets P. S. Vann 

1914... Holloways G.A.Martin G.A.Martin Henry Sheets 

1915... Centei Hill O.A.Keller O.A.Keller Henry Sheets 

1916... Wallburg .....I.M.Mercer O.A.Keller Henry Sheets 

1917... Smith Grove ..FreJ D. Hale R. S. Green Henry Sheets 

1918... Lezington M. L. Kesler R. S. Green Archibald Johnsort 

1919. .. Denton R. E. White R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1920... New Friendship J. S. Hardaway R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1921... Churchland M. L. Kesler...., R. S. Green Archibald Johnson 

1922 .. Summerville W. A. Hough R. S. Green Paul C. Newton 

1923... Abbotts Creek W. L. Barrs Archibald J ohnson.Paul C. Newton 

1924... Reeds C. H. Trueblood Archibald Johnson. Sam J. Smith 

1925... Liberty C.A.Owens Archibald Johnson. Sam J. Smith 

1926. .. Rich Fork E. N. Gardner Archibald Johnson. Sam J. Smith 

1927... Thomasville H. T. Penry Archibald Johnson. Sam J. Smith 

1928... Holloways M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson. Sam J. Smith 

1929... Stoners Grove J. M. Hays... Archibald Johnson.Sam J. Smith 

1930... Abbotts Creek M. L. Kesler Archibald Johnson.Sam J. Smith 

1931... Denton M.O.Alexander ...G. Wilson Miller. ..Sam J. Smith 

1932... Lexington G. A. Martin G. Wilson Miller... Sam J. Smith 

1933... Lick Creek E. F. Mumford G. Wilson Miller. Sam J. Smith 

1934... Jersey W. L. Warfford G. Wilson Miller... Sam J. Smith 

1935... Mills Home E. C. Roach R. D. Covington... Sam J. Smith 

1936... Reeds J. A. Neilson R. D. Covington.. . Sam J. Smith 

1937... Churchland W. K. McGee R. D. Covington... Sam J. Smith 

1938... Denton John A. McMillan G. Wilson Miller . Sam J. Smith 

1939... Wallburg H. M. Stroup R. D. Covington. .Sam J. Smith 

1940... Center Hill L. S. Gaines R. D. Covington... Sam J. Smith 

1941... New Friendship N. C. Teague R. D. Covington... Sam J. Smith 

Liberty I. G. Greer 

1942... Abbotts Creek ...... R. A. Herring H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1943 ... Lexington B. A. Mitchell H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

1944.,, Thomasville C. B. Atkinson H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 



1 Now is High Point 

2 Now is Churchland 

3 Now is Eldorado 

4 Now is Clemmonsville 

5 Now is Wallburg 



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Special to Associational 
Missions 



Special to State 
Missions 



Special to Home 
Missions 



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Missions 



Special to Schools 
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Theological Seminarie; 



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Minister's Relief 



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Total for Missions 
and Benevolences 
Giver h-<' the Church 
and all Departments 



Grand Total All 
Purposes Given 
Last Year 




LIberliy Baptist: Association 

North Carolina 
19^5 

* ★ ★ 

One Hundred and Thirteenth Annual Session 

Held Wlih 

JERSEY BAPTIST CHURCH 

LINWOOD, N. C. 
September 25th and 26th, 1945 
★ * ★ 



The next Session will be held September 24th and 25th, 19^6 
With the Denton Baptist Church, Denton, N. C. 



INDEX 



★ ★ * 



Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 5 

Auxiliaries — Assoclational 3-30-44 

Baptist Institutions "Within Association 4 

- Church Clerks 54 

Choir Directors 5 

Chaplains 5 

Church Treasurers 56 

Committees: Appointed by Moderator 15 

On Time. Place and Preacher 15 

To Rrinp Reports for 1946 15 

Constitution and By-I^aws 7 

Deceased Members 37 

Directories: Asso< iatlonal 3 

B. T. U. 4-in 

Choir 5 

Church 51 

Centennial Crusade 25 

Christian Education 25 

Christian literature 12 

Committee Appolntjpents 15 

Conmilttee on Nominations of Officers 15 

Ordained Ministers 51 

Klectlon of Officers 23 

Historical Tables 48-49 

Map - 50 

Messengers 5 

New Pastors 15 

Order of Business 9 

Ordained Ministers 4 

Orphanage Representative . 17-34 

Pastors of Association 51 

Reports: Baptist Periodicals 12 

American B11)le Societv 32 

Proceedings, Associatlonal 9 

Committee on Obituaries 37 

Committeee on Programs 9 

Committee on Resolutions 37 

Committee on Time. Place and Preacher 36 

Finance 36 

Koreig'n Missions 31 

Home Missions 28 

Hospitals 1^ 10-27 

Mills Home 17 

Ministerial Relief 34 

Music 34 

Public Morals 20 

State Missions _ 27 

State of the Churches 24 

Sunday Schools 13 

•Treasurer's 14 

Training Union 19 

W. M. U. Work 16 

Woman s Missionary Union 39 

Sunday School Associatlonal Meetings 3 

Statistical Tables 51-57 

Sermon, Annual 1 15 

Sunday School Superintendents , 52 

Visitors 14 



I.TBKRTV BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



— Officers — 



N. C. Teague. Moderator 

Dan S. Hay worth, Vice Afodrrator 

Albert L. Snider Clerk and Treasurer 



Route «, Lexington 
Route 2. High Point 
__ Denton 



PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Name Church Address 

Rev. W. K. McGee, Chni.ThoniasvUle . Thomasville 

Dan S. Hayworth Abbotts Creek Xo. 2. High Point 

D. L. Tyaing'er I'enter Hill Xo. 6. I^exington 

Ij. E. Riekard Churchland Xo. 1, Mnwood 

R. Ij. Bostie Carolina Avenue Thomasville 

A. Ij. Snider Denton Denton 

K. C. Haynes Krlanger lOrhinger 

(i. C. Palmer Holloways Xo. fi, Lexington 

H. \j. Palmer .lersey Xo. 1, T,in\vood 

Sam J. Smith Lexington Lexington 

O. F. Hughes Liberty Xo. 2, ThomaHvllle 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek High Roek 

C. V. Motsinger New Friendship Xo. Winston-Salem 

I. G. Greer Mills Home 'I'hoinasville 

Jeff L. Carriok Mountain View Xo. (i. Lexington 

K. C. I.rfimbeth Dak Hill .Memorial Xo. 2, ThonmsviHo 

F. M. Smith Pleasant Plains Denton 

J. C. l.,eonard ReeciS) Xo. :?, Lexington 

Millard Wilson _ _Reed Street 20') Green Ave, T'vllle. 

AVillie Bowers ^_Ri< h Fork Xo. 1. Thomasville 

•L W. Byars Sheets Memorial Lexington 

G. K. Morefleld Smith Grove Xo. 4, Thomasville 

Ij. K. Lookablll Stoners (Jrove Southmont 

Kdd Bpps Southside Thomasville 

J J. C Carriok Sununervllle Xo. ^, l>enton 

S. R. Laws Thonuisvllle Thomasville 

Add Cranford 'I'avlors (Jrove \'<-w London 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg Wallburg 

Joe Pierce VVaUers Grove Xo. 2, Lexington 

M. L. Graver Welcome Welcome 

D. L. Owens Floyd Xo. fi, I..exington 

The Moderator, Clerk and all Pastors of the Association I'^x Officio 
Members. (See Page 13 of litS.I Minutes.) 



ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. N. C. Teague N'o. 3, Lexington 

A. L. Snider Denton 

J. Roy Clifford (..exington 

C. V. Teague Wallburg 

V. W. Sears . Thomasville 

Theodore Koontz '. Krlanger .' 

J. A. Nellson ThotnasvlUe 

Assoclational Missionary, or other paid employees None 

Standing Committees None 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 

W. M. U. CONVENTION 

Mrs. N. C. Teague, Superintendent No. 3, Lexington 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Secretary and Treasurer , Thomasville 

Miss Beatrce Council, Young People's Director ThomasvlUe 

(See Index for page number of 1945 Annual Meeting Proceedings). 



SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

Marvin Hedrlck, Superintendent - Walil>urg 

Mrs. Ida C. Nading, Secretary and Treasurer, Lexington Rd., Wlnston-Saleni 
(No report of 1946 Meetings Made) 



4 



MINUriOS OF THE 



B. T- U. .CONVENTION 

Mrs. Austin Sink, President 1 No. 2, Thomasville 

MIhs liiH'ile Hayworth, Seeretury Rt. 2, High Point 

Assoclntional Representatives of the Brotherhood — None 

STATE INSTITUTIONS 

Located Within the Bounds of the Association 
Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

I. C Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville 

1?. W. Si)ilinan, Chairman Committee ^ ■ Kinston 

R. I). Covinpton, Treasurer . Thomasville 

Officers Baptist Schools, State Boards and Institutions 

Ij. a. jrartin. Trustee, Meredith t^ollei^e Ijexington 

W. K. MiOee, Trustee, Baptist Hospital Thomasville 

Dr. C. R. Sharp Trustee, Wake Forest College Lexington 

J. A. McMillian, Trustee, Wake Forest College Thomasville 

C. C. Wall, Trustee, Mills Home I^exington 

J. A. Neilson, Member, Cienerai Board Thomasville 

W. K. ftrcCee Director, Bil>lital Recorder, Inc. Thomasville 

CHURCH DIRECTORY ORDAINED MINISTERS 
Holding Membership in the Liberty Baptist Association 

Name Work Church Address 

Atkinson, C. H. Pastor Krlaii{;er Krlanger, N. C. 

Bray, l>r. B. F. Retired I'liomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

Clifford, .1. Roy i'astor Lexington Lexington, N. C. 

Coml)s, .1. A. Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

Clark, ,1. B. Pastor High Rock Mis. Lexington, N. C. 

Cox, Ben Chai)lain 'IMiomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

(^ox, J; A. Pastor Carolina Avenue, Thomasville, N. C. 

(^onner W. H. Pawtor Summerville Central Falls, N. C. 

Dickens, .L \V. Pastor Center Hill Tjcxington, No 6 

Dills, J. N. Retired South Side Thomasville, N. C. 

Kddinger, C. C. Pastor Stoner.i Grove Southmont, N. C. 

Flowe, Thos. B. Pastor Soiithside Box 124, Thomasville 

Gallimore, A. R. Missionary Lexlni^toji Wake Forest, N. C. 

Hopkins, W. H. • Pastor Walters Grove China Grove, N. C. 

Hartman, O. M. Pastor Welcome Winston-Saleni, N. C. 

Hunt, Howard Pastor Floyd Lexington, N. C. 

larrett, J. F. Teacher Center Hill Linwood, N. C. 

Kyser, R. Jj. Pastor lieid Street Thomasville 

Lanning, H. Otts Chaplain Lexington Navy, U. S. 

I^ovinggood, Paul, Phy. Director Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Maier, F. A. ■ . Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

Mitchell, B. A.' Pastor Ahbotts Creek Kernersville No. 1 

Mc(>ee. W. K. Pastor Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

McMillian, .1. A. lOdltor Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Neilson. J. A. Pastor Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D. Retired Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

Phllpott, Harry Chaplain Lexington Navy, U. S. 

F. C. Roach Pastor Denton Denton, N. C. 

Sears, Y. W. Pastor Rich Fork Thomasville, N. C. 

Teague, N. C. Pa«tor Reeds Lexington, N. Cv 

Thontpson, Zeh Not Stated Walters Grove China Grove, N. Ci 

Talbert, C. V. Pastor Smith Grove Salisbury, N. C. 

Young, C. S. Pastor Sheets Memorial Lexington, N. C. 



Ministerial Students 

Conrad Lanning Churchland Church 

Bill Everhart Lexington Church 

G. E. Moorefleld Smith Orove Church 

Ministers Ordained 

None ^ 

MISSIONARIES 

Rev. A. R. Galilmdre Lexington Church 



I.IBKRTV MAPTIST ASSOOIATIOX 



5 



CHAPLAINS 

Rev. H. Otis Tjnnnlnp T^exin^rtoll (^hiirch 

Rev. Harry Phllpott F^exinKfon ("'h<irch 

Rev. Ben W. Cox Thoinasville Church 

Assistants to Pastors or Educational Directors 

Afrs. Beanier Barnes Thomasville Church Sec. Thomasvillo, N. C. 

PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 

No Church Has a Brotherhood 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Church Name Address 

Abbott.s Creek Carey J. Davis No. 2, iiiph Point 

Carolina Ave. I. \V. i^ritt Thomasville 

(J'enter Hill Mrs. Opal f^opp No. (i, I>exinf^ton 

Churchland Mrs. .lack I^cslor No. '>, I^cxington 

Denton Mr.-i. C. K. Clyatt Denton 

Krlanger K. T. Mri;>ade Krlanper 

Floyd Row Howard Hunt No. fi, ticxinnton 

Hollowa.vs Ci. C. Palmer Xo. l^cxington 

Jersey R. 1^. I'almer No. 1, hinwood 

I.iexinfi:ton Mrs. Paul H. Miller I.exinpton 

Ijihert.v Mrs. Austin ^^ink N'o. 2, Thomasville 

I..lck (^reek None Kcported 

Mills Home W. M. Ix^rd Thomasville 

Moimtain View Lucy Tysinper No. 1, Denton 

New I'^'riendship Allen Jones No. fi, "W nston- Salem 

Oak Hill Memorial Richard .Farratt Thomasville 

Pleasant Plains Tloward Hunt No. (i. I.cxinpton 

Reeds K. C.. Kritts No. fi, lAxinpton 

Rich F'ork Mrs. Haiina ICddinper __Thomasville 

Reid Street 10. \j. Ryerly ThomasvUla 

Sheets Memorial Rji.v Yarhorouph Dekota Ave, Ijcxinpton 

Smith drove Lee Swinson No. 1, TAnwood 

Southside \V. L. Rule Thomasville 

Stoners (Jrove Mrs. (\ li. Monsees Southmont 

SummervlUe ftirt •> . H. Conner Central Falls 

Taylors (Jrove Mrs. Rny Owen N'o. 2, New J^ondon 

Thomasville Flizalteth Hamrick Thonuisviile 

Wallburg Mrs. Hen King Waliburg 

"Walters rjrove Kverett Pierce No. 2, Lexington 

Welcome K. \j. Davis Welcome 



MESSENGERS TO THE ASSOCIATION 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Afrs. B. A. Mitchell, B. A. Mit.hell. Airs. Willie Boden- 
heimer, Clarence F. Moore. Minnie Hayworth, Mrs. D. S. Hayworth. 
Laura Moore. John Spurgeon. Mrs. John Si^urgeon. Carey J. Davis, Mrs. 
Roy Hayworth, L. B. Moore, Mrs. 1j. H. Moore, D. S. Hayworth. Clyde 
Spurgeon. Mrs. Marg'aret Spurgeon, C. E. Spurgeon. 

CAROLINA AVBNUP: — Rfrs. J. A. Cox. C.aye Lanier, Nat Buckner, Mrs. 
.Joe Ingram. 

CENTE'R HILLr— J. W. Dickens. Mrs. J. P. Lopp. Mrs. R. B. Sheets. 
Mrs. J. W. Dickens. Mrs. Hugh L. INIilier. Mrs. W. S. Hunt, Mrs. Clinton 
Mabry. Mrs. John Jarratt. Annie Owen, Mr.s. liloyd Owen. 

CHURCHLAND — Victory I... Andrews. Glenn r?arnes. Caleb .Shayce. :\rrs. 
Glenn Barnes. Mrs. John Wilson, Mrs. Sidney Simerson, W. 11. Lomax. 
Mrs. Graham Barnes. Mrs. Ray Hilton. Mrs. Victor Ij. Andrews, John 
F. Jarratt, Mrs. H. O. Walser, Mrs. Gilmer J. Beck, Rev. Gilmer J. Beck. 

DENTON — E. C. Roach. Mrs. E. C. Roach. Mrs. A. Jj. Plummer, Mrs. Bon 
Carroll. Ross Henderson, Mrs. Ross Henderson. Mrs. Ross Wall, Ross 
Wall. Mrs. H. C. Keever, Mrs. S. L. Murray, Mrs. V. K. Skeen, Mrs. 
B. V. Morris, Uzlna Morris. W. R. Snider. 

ERLANGER— C. B. Atkinson. Mrs. C. B. Atkln.son. Mrs. V. I. Snyder, 
Mrs. S. Crow, Mrs. E. T. RfcDade. Mrs. J. B. Powell, Mr. B. L. Holmes. 

FLOYI>— None 

HOL.LOWAYS — Mrs. Hugh Palmer, Mr. Grover Palmer. Ida Beanblossoni, 
Mrs. D. R Beanblo.ssom, Mrs. S. D. Brlggs, Mrs. Paul Palmer, Mrs. 



6 



MINl'TKS OF' THE 



Ij. C. Cross. Ti. r. Cross, Myrtle Reanblossom. Grace Palmer, George 
Worknmn. 

HIGH llOCK MISSION — Rev. J. B. Clark. Mrs. C. A. Aycock, Mrs. Z. Li. 
AforKan. Mrs. 1. R. InRratn. Mrs. W. T^. Bradshaw, Mrs. J. B. Clark, 
Mrs. Clyde Woolard. 

.TERSKY — C C. Edinper. Mrs. Roy Smith, Roy Smith, Mrs. J. N. Penning- 
er Mrs. R. Ij. Palmer. Mrs. W. C. Roach, Held Smith, Mrs. R. A. Tate, 
ISIrs. iv. Ij. Smith, Afrs. J. S. Barnes. Mrs. C. H. Pennlng'er, C. H 
PenninRer. R. A. Tate, Mr. J. T. Barnes. IMrs. Kenneth Lannine, 
Bol)l)ie Sharpe. Mr.s. Banks Sharpe. Mrs. S. A. Sharp, Sara Sharpe, 
Mrs. S. M. Smith. Mr. Charles t^ippley, liorcas Tate, Mr. C. A. Smith, 
Mrs. r. A. Smith, Helen 'l^ttc. Elizabeth Sinith. Carey Sharpe, I. A. 
.Sharpe. S. A. Shariie. l->Uhcr Sharpe. Mrs. I. A. Sharpe. Sara Pen- 
nlnper. Mr!K Walter Yow. C. T. Yow, Mrfe. C. T Yow, Mr. Will Smith. 
.Tohn X. PenninKcr, .Tr.. AV. E. Smith. Mrs. Joe Pope W. K. Trexler, 
Mrs. S. AV. McCachem. 

LEXINGTON — J. Rov Clifford. Miss Roxie Sheets. Miss Lizzie Hanes 
Mrs. Sam .1. Smith, Sam .f. Smith. V. V. Everhart. Ci. W. IMiller, Mrs. 
B. F. Lee. Mrs. !>. V. Conrad. B. F. T..ee, Mrs. S. E. Miller, Mrs 
G W. Miller, Afrs. O. K. Sharpe. Mrs. .1. T. .Tackson, Mrs. P. A. 
Mvrev;, H. C. :Myres. P. A. Afyres, ^Slrs. F. B. Edwards. Mrs. .1. N. 
.Tenkins. Mrs. .1; F. Goodrum. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. Austin Sink. Ti. E. Heliiler. Mrs. Haywood Lambeth, Mrs. 
Clifford Lambeth. Clifford Lambeth. E. T. Kennedy. Mrs. E. T. Kennedy. 

TJCK CREEK— Henry McnoNvell, David Kinney, Ernest R. Wall. Kather- 
ine Freozor, Mrs.'w. A. .Tarvis, Mrs. .1. A. Kinney. 

FEEZOR— .1. A. Ncllson. Mrs. C. C. McKoin, Beatrice Council. Paul 
Lovinjrood. .1. A. McMillan, :Mrs I. P. Frazier. Mrs. Maud«' Seagle. 
I. G. Greer. 

MOCNTAIN VIEW— Mr. Cuthor Carrlck. Mrs. Cuther Carrick. Mrs. .Titlia 

Carrick. Essie Parker. Lucy Mai.> Carrick. Mrs. (May Carrick, Harris 

Wall. Nan Wall, Sadia <\-»rrick. Orlcn Carrick. 
NEW FRIEXHSHIP— :Mr.s. Glennie Swain, Mrs. S. O. Hinkle. 
OAK HlLI.n-:Mrs, .John Rumi>lc. Mrs. Coy Kennedy, Mrs. Carl Trotter, 

Mrs. Richard .Tarrett. 
REEOS — N. V. Teapuc, Mrs. L. P. (Vaver. Mrs. G. F. Koontz. INIr. W. L. 

Craver, R. W. Hege, Mrs. R. W Hege, Edwin V Hunt. Mrs. N. C. 

Teague Mrs. Thurman Myres, Airs. Alda Craver. Mrs. .1. W. Morphls. 
REin STREET— Rev. R. L. Kjzer. Mr. H. J. Embry. Mrs. J. J. Kmbry. 
RICH FORK— Mr. Tom Small. O. F. Tate. V. AV. Sears, Mrs. AV. M. 

lOdingcr. 

SHEETS AIEAlORTAI^Mrs. (Miarlie Blesecker. Mrs. Odls Frank. Mrs. 

T. J. Peter.s. Mrs. Z. A'. Fulbrlght, Mrs. Irvin;;' Cooper. 
SMITH (;R0A'I'>- C. A'. Talbert. Mrs. T. AV. Lanning. Mrs. Rov G. Orrell, 

Mrs. C. A'. Talbert. 
SOUTHSli:>l'>-Rev. Thomas B. Flowe. Mrs. Roy Eddlnger. Julia Beck, 

J. D. AVllliams, Mr. Kenny A. Myres. Nannie Byerley. 
STONEH.S GROA'E— AV. J. Parker, Mrs. H. T. Penry. Mrs. Joe Long, Hugh 

AVafford. lAlrs. Hugh Wafford. Loyd E. Lookabill. 
SUMAfERVILLE — Rev. AV. H. Conner, Mrs. W. H. Conner. Mrs. Robins 

Bean. Mrs. Will Davis. 
THOMASA'ILLE— W. K. McGee. F. A. Maier, Mrs. AV. K. McGee, Mrs. 

R. S. Green. Mrs. H. S. Embry, Mrs. G. C. Guin. Mrs. R. G. Jenrilugs. 

S. B. I.iaws, Mrs. Ben Cox. Mrs. Beamer H. Barnes. 
WALTERS GROA'I-:— Mrs. J. A. Galllinore. Mrs. Millard Surratt, Mrs. John 

A'ates, Mrs. Carl Gallimore. Mrs. !>avld A. Surratt. 
AVELCOMb>- Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman. Mrs. C. S. Hayes, Carrie N. Haynes. 

Mrs. J. P. (^rotts. 

AA'EST END MISSION— Rev. Thomas B. Flowe, Mrs. Woodrow Stevenson, 
Mrs. Tominie Trotter, Mrs. Paul Maley. 

VLSITORS— -Mrs. Robins Bean. Mrs. O. B Carrick. Pearl Stout, Herbert 
Bowers. Mrs. Shclton Surratt, Mrs. R. Terry F>itts. Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlie Bodenhelmmer. Janet Lambeth, Mrs. D. A. Kinney, Mrs. R. A. 
Hill, Ruth Teague. Mrs. AV. L. Craver. Mrs. N. C. Carter. Mrs. Paul 
(5alllmore, Mrs. Joe Cecil. Jr., Mrs. Foy Trantham, R. C. Foster. Ruby 
Zlglar. S. E. Miller. Mrs. Robert Hunter. Geneva McCachern, S. E. 
Jarrett. L. L. Caipenter. R. H. Satterfield, D. R. Kesler, Mrs. D. R. 
Ke.sler Shirleln Davis, 1). A. Simpson, H. M. Stroupe, Mrs. H. M. 
Stroupe. Hoyt Black well. Earl L. Bradley. Mrs. G. Mannings, C. E. 
Parker. Carothes Bodenhelmer, Dean B. Bryan. Mrs. D. B. Bryan. 
Mrs. I. S. Bodenhelmer. 



I.IRIOUTY JIAI'TIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

XAMK 

Article 1. The name of th" l>of1y shill l)e "The I.Hicrty BaiUist Asso- 
ciation." 

on.Ti=:cT 

Article 2. It shall ho the object of this Association to furnish tlio Cos- 
pel (as we hold it) to the people within the l)oun(ls of the Association, iu\<l 
to co-operate with the Haptist State fonventlon. 

Mi:.Mr5i:i{.sHn» 

Article 3. The Association shall consist of the officers of (he Assoiia- 
tion. pastors of the churches of the Asso< lat ion. and messcnpers from tho 
churches. ICach shall he entithd to three mcsscnRers and one additional 
niessenper for every SO members or fraction thereof over and above 100 
jnembers. 

OFFiriOllS 

Article 4. The officers of this Association shall bo a moderator, vico 
moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall b»> elected each 
yenr by the Association at its annual meotinp: and shall hold office until 
their successors arc elected. The duties of the officers shall correspond 
to the duties of the same officers in like orjianizat ions, or as defined by 
the Association from time to time. 

■ nOAlin ANO ("OMMITTIOKS 
Article r>. The Asso<iation shall elect mti lOxecutive Committee oacli 
year whose duties shall be to look after havin^^ tho pospel preached in 
all ))arts of the Asso<iation. and to attend to all business in the Asso- 
ciaion between tho s«\ssion and to make such rciiorts as they doom ad- 
visable at tho annual meeting of the Association. The Asso( iation may 
apjioint or elect such other board.---, or committees from time to time as 
circutnstances may require. 

TiMK oi'^ mi:kti.vc. 

Article r>. The Association shall nicct amnially on 'J'vusday after the 
fourth Sunday in September. The mrrtbrator may at the recinest of the 
Executive Committee change the time f)r i»lace of meeting of this Asso- 
ciation when it inay be deemed hy him not ixpcMlli-nt to meet at the 
time or place appointed. (Articl No. fi was amended Sept. ti, 1".M4 to rc-atl 
on Tuesday after 4th Sunday in Septendier.) 

VA(\\NtMi:S 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the lOxecutive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occurinp between mcetiiiK of the Association. 

a]mi':m>:mki\ts 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any rec'ular session of 
the Association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

HY-I.AWS 

No By-Laws ado)dtd. This Association follows Kerfoot's ftuUs of l)r- 
dcr for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

OKDINATIOX OK N'ICW MlXISTKdlS 

(As recommended by the 10x(>cutlv(> Committee and Adoi)ted liy the 
Association. See pape 27, in:!!> Minutes). 

1. That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for examination 
and approval for ordination to the full work of the Oospel Mitiistry, an 
KxaminiuK Council be summoned by written invitation of at least one week 
in advance from the church nominatinfi the candidate, the Council to in- 
clude the pastor and one member-at-larKc from each Baptist Church in 
the fellowship .of tho Association. 

2. That the exandnation of the candidate be conducted publicly in the 
auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announcement Riven in 
good time so that all the brethren who wish to do so may attend the 
examination, 

3. That we ordain only those who have received definite call to become 
pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its Association whch 
church shall have requested his ordination. 

ORGANIZATION AND ADMISSION OK NEW CHURCHES 
It is recommended that any group of individuals desiring to organize 
themselves into a new church with the purpose of seeking' the recogni- 
tion of and the fellowship and cooperation with this Association, be re- 
quested to fulfill the following requirements: 



MINUTES OF THE 



1. Xotire sliall be piven to the ^foderator of the Association of the 
desire to orKanize a ehurch l)efore any such orpanization takes place. The 
aioderator will then ask the Promotion Executive Committee to study 
and pass upon the need of and the praclcability for such an organization. 

2. The location of said church shall be sufficiently removed so as 
not to interfere with the work or encroach upon the territory of the 
churches already affiliated witli the Association. This will be determined 
by the Promotion Executive Committee. 

.1. ITpon beng approved by the Promotion Executive Committee the 
jiroup will then re(|uest a council to examine the church covenant and 
the articles of faith of the proposed church. It is recommended that this 
council consist of thrie pastors and three laymen of the Association ap- 
pointed by the Moderator. Should this council approve the covenant 
and articles of faith, the groui) will then proceed to be constituted Into a 
B.aptlst (^hurch of the .same faith and order. 

4. The new church, bavin^j been duly organized and constituted, may 
at the next annual Association i>resent a letter to the Association asking 
for recogn-itlon and seekinK" fellowship with the Association, Including 
with this letter a copy of the Artcles of Faith and the church covenant 
adopted by the body, as well as a report of the work since time of or- 
ganization as it regards all phases of our Paptlst I'rogram of Missions. 
Evangelism, Education. Social Service. Training and ^Vorship. 

.'i. The previously a|)pointed council of three pastors and three lay- 
men will examine the letter and reports of the newly organized church, 
and will recojumend to the Assoi-lation its acceptance or rejection as the 
case may be. (See Minutes of 1041, Page 20.) 

RESOLUTION IN RE(5ARI> 'I'O PIIOC.UAM COMMITTEE 
The following resoluti(.n was offered and adopted: 

That the program committee consist of the officers of the Associa- 
tion, pastors of the entertaining' (burches and three persons, named by 
he Moderator during the session oi" the Association (See page .SI, 1!>41 Alln- 
utes) 

UESOlvUTlON IN UEOAHO TO MESSENC.ERS 
Rev. W. K. McC^ee offered a resolution as follows, which was adopted: 
That the names of messengers ))rlnted In the minutes Include only 

those actually attending the Association from the delegations elected by 

<he churches. 

(See Page 31. 1!>41 Minutes.) 

ASSOCIATIONAl> EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
(The following was adojited at the 1042 session. See page 38 of 1042 
Minutes.) 

Your committee recommended tl.at: 

An executive committee of the Association be formed of seven mem- 
bers. Including the Moderator and Clerk of the Association, the chairman 
of the executive-promotion committee and four other members elected by 
the Association along wlt^ the other officers of the Association: the com- 
mittee to attend to associational business between the annual meeting, 
their actions to be reported to and reviewed by the Association atinuallv. 
(This executive committee will trau-nact associational business; the pro- 
motion-executive committee will promote the Interests of the Association 
and co-operative program as formerly.) 



MRKUTV HAI'TIST ASSOOIATIOX 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

One Hundred and Thirteenth Annual Session 
of the 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 25 — 26, 1945 
Held With 

JERSEY BAPTIST CHURCH 
L I N W O O D, N. C. 

THEME: "JESUS SAVES" 

TUESDAY 
Morning Session — Sept. 25th, 1945 



1. On Tuesday, September 25'th, at 9:45 A. M. The 
Liberty Baptist Association assembled in its One Hundred 
and Thirteenth Annual Session with the Jersey Baptist 
Church of Linwood, N. C. 

2. Rev. N. C. Teague, the Moderator, called the Body 
to order for the transaction of business. 

3. The Opening Devotion was conducted by Rev. V. L. 
Andrews, pastor^ of the Churchland church. The song serv- 
ice being led by Mr. Carey Davis, Director of Associational 
Music. The song used being "Come Thou Almighty King." 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

4. A. L. Snider read the Report of the Program Com- 
mittee: the report was adopted, subject to any changes 
deemd advisable as the meeting proceeds. 



TUESDAY MORNING 



9:45 Devotion _ 

"10:00 Program Committee 

10:10 Baptist Hospital 

10:40 Christian Literature 

11:10 Sunday Schools 

11:25 Roll Call-Appointment of Committees 

11:45 Sermon _ 

12:30 Recess 



Victor L. Andrews 

A. L. Snider 

. Mrs. Ben Carroll 

B, A. Mitchell 

Elmo Woodleaf 



V. W. Sears 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON 



1:46 Devotion _ 

2:00 Woman's Missionary Union 



R. L. Kizer 



Message 

2:30 Orphanage 

2:56 Training Union ... 
3:15 Public Morals 



Mrs. N. C. Teague 
Dr. W. K. McGee 

Mrs. I. P. Frazier 
. Mrs. Austin Sink 
. Jesse W. Dickens 



10 



THEME: JESUS SAVES 

Message _ ». Dr. I. G. Greer 

4:00 Adjourn 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

9:45 Diction ... . — -a,..:;. JCf'y^ Talbert 

10:00 Election of Officers and Business 

10:20 Cliristian Education „ C C. Edinger 

11:00 Relief and Annuity Sam J. Smith 

11:15 Cooperative Program . , 

1. State Missions Mrs. J. B. Powell 

2. Home Missionaries .1.- Mrs. S. O. Hinkle 

3. Foreign Mission.s .^....i,.^ W. H. Connor 

11:30 Message _ _ Sec. M. A. Huggine 

12:30 Recess 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

1:45 Devotion _ E. C. Roach 

2:00 American Bible Society ' F. A. Maier 

2:20 Report on Music W. B. Lord 

2:35 State of Churches and Report of Centennial Crusade 

- J. Roy Clifford 

3:00 Report of Committees 

3:15 Message — "Our Churches Continuing Their Evangelistic 

Efforts" Rev. R. Knolp- "-'-eld 

4:00 Final Adjournment 

5. Rev. Roy Clifford made announcements regarding 
Centennial Crusade. 

REPORT ON HOSPITAL 

6. Report on the Baptist Hospital was made by Mrs. Ben 
Carroll, cf Denton Church. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPORT OF NORTH CAROLINA 
BAPTIST HOSPITAL— 1945 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital was incorporated in 1922 
and received its first patient May 28, 1923. Originally planned as a 
100-bed institution, it was enlarged in 1942 to a capacity of 247 beds 
and 55 bassinets. 

The underlying purpose of the Baptist Hospital has always been 
medical care for the poor. Since the day it received its first patient 
it has offered a high type of hospital care on a statewide basis. Its 
caliber of service was enhanced many times over when the Wake 
Forest Medical School became a four-year school in 1941 and was 
located adjacent to the Baptist Hospital. When the Baptist Hospital 
became a teaching hospital, its purpose became twofold — teaching 
and healing, the twin endeavors of Christ. 

The Baptist Hospital operates one of the fullest approved schools 
of nursing in the South, and at the present time has an enrollment 



T.IMKIITY HAFTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



of about 150 young ladies receiving professional training under 
Christian auspices. The students are selected under very high stand- 
ards. These students come from all over North Carolina and repre- 
sent the highest type of womanhood — mentally, physically and mor- 
ally. While the most rigid scientific training is given the girls, the 
hospital takes great pride in the Chri-^tian and humane attitude it 
develops in these girls. 

Of the 8,000 patients admitted as bed patients each year, slightly 
ever 4,000 of these are service patients who pay no doctor's fee, and 
pay but a slight portion of their hospital expenses. During 1944 ap- 
roximately 3,000 of these service patients paid absolutely nothing to- 
ward their hospital bill. It is toward the expense of the^^e patients 
that the money given on Mother's Day each year is u-sed. In addition 
to the free bed patients the hospital, as stated above, gives diagnos- 
tic examinations to approximately 20,000 free patients who are not 
admitted to the hospital each year. The cost to the hospital of free 
service rendered during 1944 was $198,648.92. 

The hospital has developed into one of the top ranking hospi- 
tals of our nation in the caliber of its medical work. In developing 
its medical program care has been taken that the spiritual atmos- 
. phere of the hospital should develop to the same measure. Emphasis 
is given at every turn, in its educational program, in its employees, 
and with its patients to the spiritual needs of all coming in contact 
with the hospital. The religious program is under the direction of a 
full-time Chaplain and Student Secretary. This fine and fruitful 
service is made possible in part by the generosity of Mr.' C. M. Scott 
of High Point, North Carolina, who contributes toward the cost 
of the program. Due to the close touch with the nature of sickness 
allows the Chaplain to have with the patients, we have had many 
conversions and rcdedications in the hospital. 

North Carolina Baptists have developed in their hospital one 
of the greatest medical centers in our country, and at the same 
time one of the strongest influences for the cause of' Christ that 
I exists in any land. Its huge opportunities for serving as an agency 
of mercy, as a means of teaching, and as a means of spreading the 
influence of Christ are a challenge to the generous heart of our 
great denomination that its program will not be restricted for lack 
of finances. All of its activities are operated on the highest of stand- 
ards, and hence it requires a tremendous budget. It is self-support- 
ing with the exception of its charity work, and it is for this merciful 
side of its program that North Carolina Baptists this year are giv- 
ing over $100,000 through the Mother's Day program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Ben Carroll 

After motion to adopt the report, it was adopted and 
on motion of Dr. W. K. McGee, in the absence of the hospi- 
tal representative, that we have report on Christian Lit- 



\ 



12 



^lINmMOS OF THE 



erature and have Hospital discussion at a later date. Motion 
was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

7. The report on Christian Literature was made by Rev. 
B. A. Mitchell, pastor of Abbotts Creek and Wallburg 
Churches. 

7. REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

If "reading make.3 a full man", reading also makes our church 
constituency full in knowledge. 

The press is a recognized agency in the spi-ead of truth and in- 
formation. The reach of the printed page commends itself to us. 
Our literature is not designed to take the place of the spread of 
truth by word of mouth and personal witnessing, but is an effective 
aid and ally to us in getting the job done. As such, it is to be ad- 
vantageously used and heartily supported among us. 

The Bible is the corner stone of all our literature, and supplies 
the motive for all our other publications. Among them are our state 
baptist papers, home and foreign mission magazinee, lesson and 
training materials, published by the Sunday School Board, and 
many good bcoks of a high order. Each of these is a help to spiri- 
ually enriching our people and the churches, and deserves to be 
well used. 

Two of these publications command our interest more specifi- 
cally — The Biblical Recorder, and Charity and Children — because 
they are our very own. 

Dr. L. L. Carpenter, editor of the Recorder, reports a circula- 
tion of better than 34,000. What is more, with such a circulation, our 
paper is financially self supporting. We particularly commend the 
"Every Family Plan" which puts the Recorder in every church home 
for $1.20 per year. Besides, this is very favorable to the increasing 
of circulation. 

Charity and Children, our Orphanage publication, is dear to 
the hearts of North Carolina Baptists, and continues to do a great 
service. We have discovered clubs of Charity and Children in nearly 
all the churches we have visited from the mountains to the sea. This 
publication is an effective instrument in keeping the hearts of 
North Carolina Baptists open and responsive to the needs of the 
orphan child. 

Your committee commends the service of all our Baptist litera- 
ture, and recommends its use. 

Respectfully submitted, 
B. A. MITCHELL. 

The report was adopted, and Bro. B. A. Mitchell dis- 
cussed the report. Further discussion was made by Bro. 
C. B. Atkinson, in behalf of the publication of "TO- 



13 



MORROW" telling us that the whiskey business cost Am- 
erica $7,000,000,000 last year, costing every citizen $54.00. 

Also Bro. J. Roy Clifford made some remarks regard- 
ing our Baptist Literature. Further discussion was made 
by Bro. Sam J. Smith. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

In the absence of Brother Elmo Woodleaf and at the request 
of our moderator, Rev. N. C. Teague, I have prepared this brief, hist 
minute report which of necessity must be brief. 

The Sunday School continues to hold a most important place 
in the work of the church, for it is the church teaching the Word of 
God. 

Dr. J. M. Frost said of the Sunday School 34 years ago: 
"While holding steadfastly to the one basal purpose of teaching 
the scriptures, the Sunday School ha's yet greatly widened in it^ aim. 
As a force for study and teaching the Word of God. as a force for 
evangelizing and bringing lost sinners to the Saviour, as a force 
for instruction and education in the mightiest things claiming the at- 
tention of men; as a force for mission operation in the world-wide 
sense; as a force for making Christian character in men and wo- 
men; and for opening the door of usefulness on a large scale — in 
all these things so essential in 'the life and mission of the church, 
the Sunday School holds rank among its very first and chosen 
"gencies. 

Such a comprehensive and all-inclusive program has never been 
. needed more than today as we face this most difficult period of re- 
adjustment and reconversion. 

But such a program is impossible without faithful, dependable 
spirit-filled teachers who love God's work and who love the souls 
of men. A Sunday School cannot rise higher spiritually than it<5 
teachers. 

That we have many such fine teachers in our Sunday Schools 
goes without saying, but we need many more. 

We are able to report this year in our Liberty Association, an 
enrollment of 6487, an increase of 301 over the enrollment last year. 
The average attendance this year was 3892, 523 more than last year. 

Baptisms from the Sunday School almost trebled this year, for 
we report 318 baptisms an increase of 200. 

I would pay tribute here to those who have helped to make this 
report possible — to that noble band of men and women and young 
people who are faithfully carrying on the work of the S. S. week 
after week, with no renumeration other than the joy of rendering 
service in the Master's name. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON. 



14 



MINITTKS OF TMK 



8. Report on Sunday School was made by Rev. J. A. 
Neilson in the absence of Bro. Elmo Woodleaf. Upon motion 
to adopt the report, it was discussed by Bro. W. K. McGee 
and the report was adopted. 

9. We were led in a song by Bro. Carey Davis. Song: 
"Jesus Saves." 

VISITORS 

Visitors were recognized; Rev. R. C. Foster, of Leaks- 
ville, Miss Ruby Ziegler, Miss Elizabeth Smith and Rev. 
R. M. Hauss of Shelby, N. C, Rev. H. M. Stroup, Kannapolis, 
Former moderator. Men who have been in service were 
recognized at this time. New Pastors were Rev. E. C. Roach 
and V. L. Andrews. 

10. Treasurer's Report 

TREASURER'S REPORT 



Money Received $220.08 

DISBURSEMENTS— 

Postage, programs, envelopes _ $ 19.15 

Printing Minutes 135.00 

Mrs. A. L. Snider, typing 10.00 

Clerk _._ 50.00 

Balance In Treasury $ 5.93 

Special Collection % 21.36 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Telegram Rev. Louis Gain«3 $ .57 

Rev. J. S. Hopkins 1.50 



TOTAL $ 2.07 

Balance In Treasury _ | 19.29 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $214.15 



Totals Combined in Treasury $ 25.22 



Report adopted. , -,„•: f.,,., 

11. Roll call of Churches was made at this time. All 
Churches except the following were present — Carolina 
Avenue, Floyd, New Friendship, Pleasant Plains, Taylor's 
Grove. (New Friendship and Carolina Avenue representa- 
tives came in later.) 

12. Appointment of Committees. 



l.inKUTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



IS 



COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE— W. K. McGee, Chairman, V. W. 
Sears, D. S. Hayworth, Mrs. Austin Sink, Mrs. V. L. Andrews. 

COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE and PREACHER — Sam J. 
Smith, Mrs. Paul Palmer, R. C. Wall, John Reid, O. R. Bean. 

COMMITTEE TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING REPORTS 
NEXT YEAR — E. C. Roach, Chm., Mre. S. 0. Hinkle, Miss Sallie 
McCracken, J. W. Dickens, C. S. Young, D. S. • Hay worth, G W. 
Miller. ' 

COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR 
— C. C Eddinger, Chm, Mrs. C. C. Wall, Mrs. Beamer Barner, W. H. 
Connor, Miss Etta Teague. 

COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES — J. A. Neilson, Chm., Thom- 
as'B. Flowe, D. L. Owens, Mrs. Alta Graver, Mrs. C. S. Haynes 

' COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS — J. A. Cox, Chm., Mrs. 
G. E. Morefield, R. L. Kizer, L. C. Carrick, D. L. Tysinger. 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM — J. Roy Clifford, Chm, V. W. 
Sears, J. A. Neilson. 

•is. Collection was asked for by the Moderator to care 
for any miscellaneous expenses of the Association. Same 
amounted to $29.47. 

14. Number of Pastors present 14. - 

15. Host Pastor C. C. Eddinger made announcements 
regarding noon hour. 

16. Services were then turned over to Rev. V. W. 
Sears who brought the Annual message. Bro. J. W. Dickens 
read some words from the 16th Chapter of Matt, then led 
in prayer. Bro. Carey Davis sang "Wondrous Cross." Bro. 
Sears took as his subject the following scripture: "If any 
man will deny himself, let him take up his cross and fol- 
low Me.'* At the close of the master message the congrega- 
tion was dismissed by Mr. Sears, to reconvene in the after- 
noon session at 1 :30. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

17. The Devotion was led by Rev. R. L. Kizer, Pastor 
of Reid Street Church, Thomasville. "Romans 12, 1-3. Subr 
ject "A Living Sacrifice." The song "There is a fountain 
filled with Blood" was sung, with Carey Davis leading. 

18. Rev. R. M. Hauss, Ailed Church League Leader, of 
Shelby, N. C, was given 15 minutes to speak on the liquor 
question of N. C. and the U. S. We were told that the United 
States was first in every thing, even in the whiskey busi- 



16 MINUTKS OF THK 



ness, costing each citizen $54 last year. $66,000,000 worth 
was used in North Carolina in one year. 85^^of those taken 
to Court in North Carolina go because of beverage alcohol. 
We've had an increase of $1,000,000 per year each year for 
th past five years in the whiskey business in North Caro- 
lina. 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY UNION REPORT 

Woman's Missionary Union fills a large place in all of our. 
Baptist enterprises. The object is to stimulate a missionary spring 
among the women of our churches by prayer, enlistment, Bible and 
mission study, giving, missionary education of young people, and 
community mit^ions. 

On October 3, 1944 North Carolina lost an efficient leader in 
the home-going of Mrs. L. S. Gaines. "Dur Liberty Association feels 
very keenly this loss since she was our faithful Supt. for four years. 

The Annual meeting of the Liberty Woman's Missionary Union 
wae held with New Friendship Church in April. Sixteen churches 
were represented and splendid reports were given by the leaders 
of our work. Reports reveal that there are thirty churches and one 
mission in the Liberty Association: twenty-three have a Woman's 
Missionary Society; seventeen of these have Young People's or- 
ganizations. Eight churches have fully graded unions, composed of 
W.*M. S., Y. W. A., G. A., R. A, and Sunbeams During the Special 
seasons of prayer sixty-five societies had a part both in prayer and 
gifts. The Mission Study leader reported 124 classes and 8 Schools 
of Mission were held Our Stewardship Chairman reports an increase 
in the number of tithers. For the past five years offerings have 
made a steady increase. • . 

The 1944 gifts to Special Offerings were: 

Annie Armstrong Home Mission Offering_-.$ 636.36 

Heck Memorial Offering 329.14 

State Mission Offering 543.17 

Lottie Moon Foreign Mission Offering — 1.502.07 



$3,010.74 
$5782.84 
1,362.80 
1,747.10 
152.21 



TOTAL to all objects — $12,055.69 

Under the capable and consecrated leadership of Miss Beatrice 

Council the Young People of our Association enjoyed their yearly 

Rally in November with the Mills Home church. 

Through our Community Missions Chairman we are being led 

to seek the lost, help the needy, visit the shut-ins, minister to the 

men and women in service, and to work with the Negroes. 



TOTAL _ 

Gifts to Cooperative Program - - 

Gifts to the Hundred Thousand Club 

Gifts to Other Objects 

Gifts to Worid Relief 



17 



During 1944 there were 19 tiocieties to reach the A-1 Standard. 
Special recognition is here given to the following Churches: 

Lexington First for havin a fully raded A-1 Union. 

New Friendship for reaching the A-1 Standard. This is the elev- 
enth consecutive year they have had this honor. 

Mills Home and New Friendship i*eceiyed a gift from every 
woman resident, member. 

We hope these churches will challenge others to work toward 
their achievement. 

We are stressing soul-winning and enlistment for the year 
1945. Worthy Centennial Goals were adopted at the Annual meet- 
ing in April. If we meet these we shall rejoice for having had a 
part in "Consecrating the Centennial to Christ.*' 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. N. C. Teague. 

19. Report on the "Woman's Missionary Union" was 
brought at this time by Mrs. N. C. Teague, of Reeds Church. 
The report was adopted and Dr. W. K. McGee, Pastor of 
Thnmasville Church, spoke to the report bringing a message 
"The Church and Missions." 

20. Special song "Majestic Sw.eetness" by Carey Davis, D. S. 
Hayworth, B. A. Mitchell and E. C. Roach. 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 

21. The Orphanage Report was brought by Miis. I. P. Frazier 
of the Mills Home. The report was adopted and two messages in 
song were brought by the little children of the Orphanage. 

In the report last year, you were given the general set-up of 
the officers of the Orphanage, so we will not repeat that, but will 
give more in detail the activities of the children, and their cottage 
life. 

We have sixteen cottages and an Infirmary at Mills Home, seven 
cottages at Kennedy Home, The central dining room has given way 
to a kitchen and dinmg room in each cottage, which is more home- 
like and more conducive to" better behaviour while eating. 

It is a task to try to transform a large building into a home, 
when there are twenty-four or moiie children to run into the house 
and litter up the floors after they have been cleaned up each morn- 
ing, but this is the goal for which we strive, to make each building 
a home and not just a house. Flowers are grown around each cot- 
tage and the children learn to help in caring for them and also to 
protect them from stray balls and running feet. 

There is only one matron in the girls' cottages, as the girls do 
much more of the housework, and two matrons in the boys cottages 
The dietitian has the oversight of preparing and serving the meals, 
the house mother the care of the remainder of the house, the boys 
themselves and their clothing, which is no small task. 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



The children help with the work, going tb school one half day 
and worlcing the other half. In order to have the statfe required six- 
hour day school, a supervised study hour must be kept by the mat- 
ron each night of the school week. A teacher relieves' the matron one 
night a week. ' n > : 

Our school has twelve grades and have vocational and home 
economics departments, which are of great value to the boys and 
girls. Now that Mr, Paul Lovingood has come as Physical Educa- 
tional director, all children will have a chance to liave some ex- 
ercise in the gymnasium, and not just a few on the ball teams. 

• You have noticed the splendid health record made by the boys 
registering for Service. Only 1.5'7r rejected from boys reared in 
Orphanages while the state record is over 56%. The entrance ex- 
amination, followed by balanced diet and regular hours with vaccina- 
tions for communicable diseases have helped to bring this about. 

We have an all-time pastor, with full graded Woman's Mission- 
ary Union, with 18 organizations. Also a Baptist Training Union and 
Graded Sunday School. We had 65 baptisms from the Sunday School 
this last year. 

This has been one of the best years financially, as money has 
been more plentiful than for a decade, but when we learn it costs 
$676.00 per day to care for our Orphanage family, we realize that it 
will amount to a large sum in a year's time. 

Some parents or relatives have been enable<l to take their chil- 
dren from the orphanage this year, but there are still many seeking 
admission to the Institution. The report of August 31st was 325 on 
the waiting list, 66 having been discharged and 44 admitted this 
year. 18 are in boarding homes and 38 have been given Mother's Aid. 

Wouldn't you like to be a pal or a close friend to some child 
who has no one to write to him or visit or send him little gifts? 

A Royal Ambassador Counselor from Arkansas, who was at Ft. 
Bragg, heard Mr. Greer speak and wrote wanting to be a friend to 
some boy and was given the name of one of my boys, but this sold- 
ier readily included the younger brother and the fine fellowship and 
wholesome influence continues .even though this friend has gone 
overseas. Mrs. Blake or Miss Elmore will furnish you with the name 
of some lonely child to whom you can bring a bit of sunshine by re- 
membering them, so he will not feel so left-out when other children 
are receiving letters, packages and visitors.. 

We cannot build orphanages large enough to care for all needy 
children. Wrecked homes are the greatest tragedies of the present 
generation. We win military victories in vain, at the expense of 
our fine boys and girls, unless we can here at home win moral and 
spiritual victories, that will unshackle the children of tomorrow. 

Mrs. I. P. Frazier. 



l.IMKHTY HAPTIST ASSO("IATION I'J 

The report was spoken to by Rev. Paul Lovingood, Phyfiical Di- 
rector of the Mills Home. 

TRAINING UNION REPORT 

22. In the absence of Mrs. Austin Sink, of Liberty Church, the 
report on the Training Union was read by Mrs. Beamer Barnes, of 
First Church Thomasville. This report was adopted, but wa6 not 
discussed. 

Marked progress has been made in the past year toward the 
achievement of the dominant purpose of the Training Union de- 
partment of our Liberty associational work. Our leaders have sought 
to emphasize our theme, "BAPTIST PRINCIPLES FOR A BETTER 
WORLD" as they endeavored to accomplish the following purposes: 

1. — To lead all churches to undertake Training Union work as a 
church task. 

2. — To improve the quality of Training Union work by enlistment 
and development of a higher type of leadership. 

3. — To lead each church to have study courses to instruct their 
officers and leaders. 

4. — To emphasize reverence. 

5. — To cooperate with all local and denominational activities;. 

6. — To make Jesus Christ the very center of every Training 
Union activity. 

Since our last report, Jersey Church has organized an active 
Training Union. Training Unions are functioning each Sunday night 
in eighteen of our churches with a total of eighty-three unions, in- 
cluding thirteen Adult unions, fourteen Young People's unions, 
twenty Intermediate unions, and twenty-four Junior unions with 
twelve Story Hour group. We attribute much of our growth to the 
organization of new unions. 

Our goals for the year were four new Training Unionc>, eight 
Adult unions, eight Young People's unions, six Intermediate unions, 
six Junior unions, eight Story Hours, with the association being 
Standard for the year. 

Executive committee meetings were held each quarter. Very 
helpful and inspiring programs have been presented at the quarterly 
mass meetings. 

On March 18, at Abbotts Creek church, the elimination contests 
were held with the following contestants as winners: 

Junior Memory Work Drill— Laura Kay McGee, First Church, 
Thomasville. 

Better Speakers' Tournament — Bill Everhart, First Church, 
Lexington. 

We thank them for their preparation and fine performance. Due 
to the ban on Regional and State meetings we could not enter them 
in that contest and those names were published in the Biblical 
Recorder. 



20 MINITTKS OK THii: 



Our Central Training School was held the week of March 25, 
at Carolina Avenue church with Rev. Law Mobley of Raleigh direct- 
ing. While all the churches could not co-operate this particular week, 
schools were held at other dates, presenting a total of five hund- 
red twelve awards. Our goal for the year was five hundred. 

April 24 at Rich Fork church we observed Southwide Simul- 
taneous As?oc'alional Night with an attendance of two hundred 
eighty-four present. An inspirational program was presented. The 
address for the evening "THE TRAINING UNION TASK IN THE 
CENTENNIAL PROGRAM" was delivered by Rev. J. Roy Clifford 
pastor of First Church, Lexington. 

A new Century of Southern Bapiist life was ushered in with 
1945. During this great year we have pressed toward these lofty 
objectives: 

1 — A functioning Training union in every Baptist church. 

2. — The enrollment of all our people in Training Union. 

3. — The enl'istment of all our people in soul-winning, the practice 
of christian stewardship, missionary endeavor, and sacrificial living 
for Chrst in all areas of Ife. 

We must go on. Our trust is in the living God. Our faith lights 
the road to the future. May we truly continue the work with a song 
in our heart and a prayer on our lips, always remembering this: 
"Go ye," Christ said, "to all the world," 
He calls to you and me; 
. O let us gladly answer Him, 
"We'll go to make men free." 
When men shall know the truth, 
The truth shall make them free. 
Go tell the blessed news. 
Press on to victory. 
The truth shall make men free. 
' B. B. McKinney, 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Austin Sink, 

Thomasville No. 2. 

23. The Congregation was led in singing "I Need Thee Every 
Hour" by Carey Davis. 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT . 

This report was brought by Bro. J. W. Dickens, Pastor of Cen- 
ter Hill Church. The report was adopted, and discussed by Dr. I. G. 
Greer, Gen. Mgr. of Mills Home; discussing public morals and law 
enforcement, giving statistics that twelve great denominations had 
passed resolutions condemning the illicit liquor business. He also 
stated that the Church is the most dynamic organization in existence, 
if it will functon. He stated luxuries should always be taxed but 



LlHKllTY MAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



vice should be put down refjardless of cost. He also made the state- 
ment that "we have as ?:ood ripht to legalize prostitution and collect 
tax on same as we do liquor." 

The great World War number two is over, and certainly there 
is cauise for great rejoicing on the part of every one that the car- 
nage of this the world's greatest conflagration has come to an end. 
I am sure that all of us, as Christians, are thankful to God who 
has given us this great victory. During war, there is a tendency 
on the part of the nations involved, t6 drift in the wrong direction, 
rather than the right from a moral standpoint. Thiis' war has been 
no exception to this rule, but has perhaps been more so than any 
other. With the war over, we find ourselves confronted with many 
grave and seiious problems from a moral standpoint. These prob- 
lems present to the churches of America the greatest challenge 
that hai3 ever confronted them. 

One of these great problems, that confronts us with greater 
force than ever before, is alcohol as a beverage. We are istaggered 
when we learn that our drink bill last year, in this country, was 
$7,000,000,000 or $54.00 for every man, woman and child in America. 
We now have 1 saloon for every 61 families; 2 saloons for every 
church; 5 saloons for every schoolhouse. In our own state of North 
Carolina, we expended last year, not including bootleg cases, $G6,- 
797,831.05 for alcoholic beverage. We expended, during this period, for 
all church work $20,000,000, for public schools $26,000,000. If we 
will deduct the $46,000,000 expended for church work and public 
education from the amount expended for drink, we will find that 
we expended for drink $20,797,831.05 more than for all church work 
and public education. Do these figures present to us as a nation and 
a state a very pleasant picture? I am sure that all clear thinking 
Americans should be aroused over thiis tragic picture. This is only 
the financial side. What about the other side of suffering, crime and 
distress that comes from this terrible traffic? We are grateful to 
the Allied Church League, the W. C. T. U. and other organizations, 
that are doing so much to inform the public about this great evil 
that is spreading so much destruction throughout our land. 

Another problem that presents itself to us today, is the break- 
down in the home life of our country. This institution that is the 
very foundation on which nations rest. Our divorce rate is stag- 
gering. Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, has said: "The American home is still the basis of our 
social order, and the nation will never be any stronger than the 
home. The rising youth problem in crime, streams directly from the 
home. The one thing that most juveniles have in common is the 
lack of proper home training. There is no character building agency 
that can take the place of a good home." We wonder what the result 
of so many hasty marriages, that have taken place in the past few 



22 



years, will mean to our already great divorce problem. May God 
help us as ministers and christian people, to stress the sacredness 
of the marriage vow, and the importance of the home in the life 
of a nation. 

Then there is our problem of crime. The report of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, July and August, 1944 shows that the 
age group, male and female, in which the largest number of arrests 
occur, is eighteen to twenty-two. For the first three months of 
1944, the increase in arrest at seventeen years of age and under 
amounted to 40.1 per cent. The inci-ease in female arrests in the 
eighteen to twenty age group for the same period was 41.4 per 
cent. The arrest of girls under 21 years of age for drunkenness, va- 
grancy, disorderly conduct, prostitution and sex crimes in the first 
half of 1944 increased 89 per cent over the record of 1943. There are 
in America moie than 4,300,000 criminals actively engaged in their 
criminal business of robbing and murdering. Our national crime bill 
is $15,000,000,000 fevery year, or $111.10 for every man, woman and 
child in this country. The Bureau reports a major crime every 22 
seconds throughout the year, or 1,300,000 major crimes in 1944. 
Eighteen year old boys and girls were guilty of committing these 
crimes more than any other age group. The tragedy of crime in Am- 
erica has a direct connection with the decline in religion. 52 per 
cent of the population of the country are out of touch with any 
church, and millions cf our children receive no Sunday School in- 
struction. It is estimated that 95 per cent of the youth in jails and 
penitentiaries today come from families untouched by religion. 

In view of these things, what will the righteous do? What 
ought to be done? What can the church do? Mr. Hoover in an ad- 
dress, makes some fine suggestion that we do not feel that we can 
improve upon. Therefore, we give some of them to you in part: 
First: "With united voice demand of the government, city, state 
and national, that it act in behalf of morality and religion. That 
is what we ought to expect of the government, of our city, of our 
state and our nation, that they help the church in its battle with 
crime and iniquity. 

In the second place: Abandon all thought and hope of mending 
the situation by discussions, conferences and the appointment of di- 
rectors of Religious Education. What we must do is to dig again 
the choked wells of Biblical preaching and of personal accountabil- 
ity to God and of joy in His salvation. 

Third: In teaching and in preaching press home the claims of 
Christ for immediate decision. No one becomes a Christian, a dis- 
ciple of Christ, without decision, and no one will decide unless he is 
called upon to decide. 

Fourth: Do what we can to awaken the membership of our 
churches to their individual responsibility and opportunity as 



LimORTY HAPTKST ASSOriATION 



23 



Christians. Make it plain to them that the last meseape of our 
Saviour applies to them as much as it does to the minister. "Ye 
shall be witnesses unto me." 

Fifth: United prayer. At the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 
tury religion and morals were at a low ebb in America. There in 
the fastnesci of Kentucky a few Godly folks under the leadership 
of James McCready, assembled together and made their famous 
Covenant of Prayer, that they would meet together "Saturday at 
the setting of the sun and every Sabbath at the rising of the 
sun" to plead with God for a revival of His work. Ere long there 
was a "sound of going in the tops of the mulberry trees" and the 
flame of the Great Revival, the greatest religioue movement in the 
history of America, broke out. 

What will the righteous do? Shall we remain inactive in our 
safe retreats and utter the plaintive sigh, "After us the deluge"? 
Or shall we arise and build the walls of Jerusalem? Shall we call 
upon the Name of God, and "strengthen the things that remain, 
that are ready to die?" What shall our answer be? 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. Dickens. 

4:05 P. M. 

Benediction by Rev. Thos B. Flow. 



THE SECOND DAY 



WEDNSDAY MORNING 



25. Mr. Carey Davis was in charge of the Devotional Song Serv* 
ice. The song used was "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name," The 
Devotion was conducted by C. V. Talbert, pastor of Smith Grove 
Church. The Scripture used was Hebrews 11:1-6. 

26. A Song "Am I A Koldier of The Crose" led by Mr. Carey 
Davis. 

27. ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

Report of Committee to Nominate Officers for 1944. The Com- 
mittee heretofore appointed to nominate officers for next year, 
made the ollowing report which was adopted: 

Moderator Rev. N. C. Teague 

Vice Moderator D. S. Hayworth 

Clerk and Treasurer A. L. Snider 

Orphanage Representative Carroll Wall 



JS4 MINITTKS OF THE 



. Chairman Executive Committee Dr. W. K. McGee 

Asso. Biblical Recorder Representative .. Rev. C B. Atkinson : 

Asso. Sunday School Supt Marvin Hedrick 

Associate Sunday School Supt - B. A. Mitchell 

Director of Asso. B. T. U. - Mrs. Austin Sink 

Chorister - - Carey Davis 

Pianist Mrs. Carey Davis 

Alternate - Mrs. Austin Sink 

Members of Asso. Executive Committee: > 
J. Roy Clifford 
C. V. Teague . 
V. W. Sears 
Theadore Koontz. 

Respectfully .submitted, 

C. C. Eddinger Chm. 
• Mrs. C. C. Wall 

Mrs. Beamer Barnee 
W. H. Conner 
Miss Etta Teague 

28. REPORT OF STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

and 

CENTENNIAL CRUSADE 

This report was brought by Rev. J. Roy Clifford, Pastor of 
Lexington First Church, The report was adopted as follows: 

1. THE STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

The reports submitted by the churches indicate that the year 
1944-45 was the most successful ever experienced by Liberty Asso- 
ciation. It will be borne in mind that the following figures do not 
include the report of the one church in this association which has 
not sent a letter at this writing. 

1. MEMBERSHIP: A net gain of 440 is indicated, bringing the 
total membership in the association to 7666. There were 522 bap- 
tisms, an increase of 319. Five churches reported no baptisms. 21 
churches or missions showed a net gain in numerical strength, 7 a 
loss. Total increase in numbers is 733, a gain of 374. 

2. SUNDAY SCHOOL: An enrollment of 6585 is reported. Thie 
is a gain of 399. Average attendance totaled 3892, a rise of 523 
above last year. 

3. TRAINING UNION: 75 units exist in the churches, a drop of 
3 from last year. Enrollment rose 118 over last year to a total 
of 1049. 



4. The W. M. U.: 99 organizations report a membership of 2076, 
an advance of 415. 



25 



5. GIFTS: 

(1) For local causes : $137,380.03, a gain of $65,007.03 

(2) For Missions $ 41,854.93, a gain of $ 5,925.13 

■ (3) For the Orphanage _ $■ 8,920.01, a gain of $ 470.67 

(4) For all causes $179,544.08, a gain of $71,266.41 

All but 2 of our 32 churches and missions showed an increase 
in contributions. Those long familiar with Liberty Association assert 
that this is the greatest record of giving in the history of the as- 
sociation. 

6. RECOMMENDATIONS: 

(1) That the churches continue to feed the fires of evangelism 
by prayer and faithful witnessing to the lost. 

2) That an intensive effort to train new converts be put forth 
during this year. 

(3) That every church seek to be fully informed concerning 
the Co-operative Program of Baptists in North Carolina, 
and bend every effort to the support of that Program. 

III. THE CENTENNIAL CRUSADE 

1. The Crusade for 1.000,000 souls has resulted in increased 
evangeli.5tic activity by the churches. The marked advance in the 
number of baptisms indicates this. Exact figures for the current 
calendar year are not available at this writing. 

2. The churches have more than three months in which to press 
the campaign to win a million to Christ in 1945. Pastors and people 
are urged to continue unabated all evangelistic endeavor, 

3. This evangelistic effort, oince it is the normal activity of a 
New Testament church, should be carried foi*ward in 1946. 

4. The efforts of the area chairman, the pastors, and all key per- 
sons is appreciated. Your help during the remainder of 1945 is 
earnestly requested. 

Respectfully submitted, • 
J. Roy Clifford. .; 

29. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The i-eport on Christian Literature was made by Rev. C. C. 
Eddinger, pastor of Jersey, Holloways and Stoners Grove churches. 

In 1830 the North Carolina Baptist State Convention was or- 
ganized for a two-fold purpose: Christian education and Missionary 
Endeavor. In 1834 Wake Forest Institute, Now Wake Forest Col- 
lege, was founded. For one hundred and eleven years this institution 
hae trained Young men for the Christian ministry and for Christian 
citizenship. 

From time to time other institutions have come into being to 
join hands with Wake Forest. In 1856 Mars Hill opened its doors 



■■■■ : :H 'C i| 
, bar 



■ .■ U.I \: 



26 



MIXI'TRS OF THE 



to both boys and grirls in western North Carolina, with a glorious 
record for growth and service/ In 1887 came Buie's Academy, now 
Campbell College, located in central North Carolina with an unsur- 
passed growth and an unparalleled service. In 1899 Meredith College 
opened for education of young women. Other schools such as Win- 
gate College and Gardner Webb, although not a part of our State 
Convention are doing a fine work. 

In addition to our State Baptist Schools we have four South- 
Wide institutions for the education of ministers and Christian 
workers. At Louisville, Ky., The Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, also the Baptist Training School for Women. At Fort Worth, 
Texas, the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and the 
Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans, La. 

Through the years these institutions have made a valuable 
contribution to the Southern Baptist life and progress. And yet, 
there never has been a time when real vital Christian Education 
waG more needed than now. With all the opportunities for new mis- 
sion work and the ether openings before us now, there arises an 
urgent need for more trained, consecrated, Christian leadership. 
These institutions are vital in carrying to completion the Christian 
training begun in the Home and nurtured in the Church. On this 
trinity of Divine institutions rests our future progress, security and 
happiness. 

There is at the present a glorious opportunity for these insti- 
tutions to render a service greater than at any time in their his- 
tory. This is due in part to the service men who are going to seek 
an Education under the G. I. Bill of Rights. Too, there are many 
young men who have been cpnvei'ted during their Military service. 
They have come feeling that the Lord has some definite work for 
them to do. Even this yprtv these institutions have had to refuse 
many who would like to h»ve started their training there. We must 
give these schools adequate support at once. Else a most glorious 
opportunity will be lost. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

C. C. Eddinger. 

Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Dean D. B. 
Bryan of Wake Forest College, and R. H. Satterfield, of Meredith 
College, director of public relations, Raleigh, N. C. 

3U. At this time the Association was led in singing "More Love 
to Thee", led by Carey Davis. 

Following the singing L. L. Carpenter, Editor of Biblical Rec- 
order represented our Baptist Paper for a few minutes. He stated 
that the paper had increased more than 300% in subscriptions in 
the last three years. 



MIIIOIITV HAFTISr ASSCWMATION 27 



31. REPRESENTATIVE OF BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Rev. C. E. Parker, of the Baptist Hospital of Winston-Salem, 
discussed the hoo>pital and its needful situation. He stated the hos- 
pital had only 270 beds to serve five hundred and fifty thousand 
people in North Carolina. He also stressed tiie frreat need of oui 
hospital for enlargement to care for more people in Christ's Name. 

32. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

The report on State Mis=;ions was made by Mrs. J. B. Powell, 
cf Erlanper Church. 

STATE MISSIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA— 1945 

The purpose of State Missions is to provide a program of activi- 
ties in which each of the churches can share to the end that Christ 
may become regnant in North Carolina in all relationships. In order 
to do thi-5 many activities, which we list here, are undertaken. 

1. Aid is provided for part payment of the salaries of mission- 
ary pastors in needy and strategic places. The fact that about one- 
half of our church members in North Carolina are Baptists is due 
in large measure to the fact that we have provided help for churches 
that could not help thcm-selves. During the year ending September 
1944 we had 65 pastors who were thus being aided. These pastors 
were serving 121 churches, in which they preached nearly 0,000 ser- 
mons, made around 22,000 visits, and repoited f02 baptisms. Apart 
from the amount which these 121 churches paid on pastors' salaries 
and church buildings, namely $135,700, they gave to Convention 
causes S.34,292. Incidentally, during the past calendar year, that is 
1944, we paid a little over 829,000 in salaries to these missionary 
pastors. 

2. The Stnte Mission progiam jirovide-^ for three general mis- 
sionaries: J. C. Pipes, E. L. Spivey and Earle L. Braflley. They assist 
the General Secretary in the promotion of all the work of the con- 
vention. 

3. The Convention does not have money with which to help in 
church building, except in unusual situations. It docs seek, however, 
to buy lots in growing sections of our cities and in the ruial dis- 
tricts where a new church is being establi.shcd, or an old church wish- 
es to move its location in order to be near a good highway. The Con- 
ventin could use to good advantage .$100,000 a year in stimulating 
churches to erect better building, better educational plants, etc. 

4. The Convention also promotes the work among the Indians in 
Robeson County, and joins with the Negro Baptists of the State in 
their work. Our Convention helps the Negro Convention to provide 
for a General Secretary, and a Sunday School and Training Union 
Secretary. The good will created through this endeavor is far more 
valuable than can be said in terms of dollars. 

5. The Convention also provides for a visitation program for the 
sick in the Veterans' Hospital at Oteen and in the sanatoriums at 



L'S • IVriNl^TES OF THE 



Aberdeen and Black Mountain, and ministers to the girls at Samar- 
cand through Brother E. M. Harris. 

6. The Convention, through State Missions, cooperates with 
many of the associations in providing for Associational Missionaries. 
As a rule the Convention provides about $750 a year toward the 
salary and expenses, and the Association provides the rest. There 
are about twenty of these Associational Missionaries now employed, 
and there ought to be at least fifty. 

7. The Convention cooperates with the Home Mission Board in 
the work of City Missions. We now have four such centers in North 
Carolina: Raleigh, Greensboro, Durham and Charlotte. 

8. The Convention also promotes through the State Mission pro- 
giam Christian Education in the churches. This includes the work 
of the Sunday School Division, Training Union Division and the 
Student Union Division. These three divisions aid many churches 
during the period of a year in planning for better Sunday Schools 
and Training Unions, and in helping our students in the colleges. 

9. Of particular interest is a new and enlarged work which we 
have undertaken durmg this past summer. About one hundred of 
our finest young people from our colleges have been working in the 
churches and associatiohs this summer. It would be difficult indeed 
to overestimate the value of the work that has been done by these 
young people during the summer. 

10. Other items that come under the head of our State Mission pro- 
gram are the woik of the Allied Church League, Pastors' Schools 
and Conferences, the Noi-th Carolina Radio Hour. 

The abcve only lists the various activities that are carried on 
under our STATE MISSION PROGRAM. 

For this work the STATE MISSION ACCOUNT was provided 
during the year 1944 with ll^^^^ of the Undesignated Cooperative 
Program, plus the special designations for State Missions. The total 
amount received for this purpose from these two sources was $182,- 
862.22. We believe the amount this year will be more than $200,000. 
The W. M. U. has set the goal for the offerings during the month 
of September at $30,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. J. B. POWELL 

HOME MISSIONS LOOKING TO THE FUTURE 

The report on Home Missions was prepared and brought by 
Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, New Friendship Church. 

The survey we have made of Home Mission fields and Home 
Mission work reveals that our homeland is not evangelized. There 
is greater need today for missionaries to go to the waste places 
than ever before. The fields are gi-eater and the needs are more im- 
perative than at any time in our history. 

1. The Unchurched 

There are 25,000,000 unchurched people in the territory of the 
Southern Baptist Convention and at least 12,000,000 in Home Mis- 



LIMKIITY HAPTIST AKS(1( 'I ATION 



sion fields in Cuba, Panama and Central America. If the unchurched, 
the spiritually stranded souls in the territory of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, were placed in states the size of Mii^sissippi, they 
would fill ten states. 

2. The Foreigners and Indians 

There are 1,500,000 Mexicans and Spanish-speakinp: people and 
only 15,000 Baptists; that is, one to every one hundred. There arc 
400,000 French in southern Louisiana, with only 4,000 Bapti.>ts, one 
to every one hundred; G00,000 Italians, with less than 2,000 Baptists; 
7,000 Chinese, with about 500 Baptists; 250,000 Indians, with about 
12,000 Baptists with many thousands in New Mexico and Arizona 
as pap:an ais they were when our fathers settled this country. There 
are sixteen pueblos in New Mexico without a missionary. 

3. The Cities 

Sixty per cent of the population of our cities are unchurched. 
In the south as a whole one out of every 8.G people is a Baptist, but 
in our cities only one out of every 34 people, is a Baptist. In the sixty 
largest citie-Si in our territory thei'e are 13,000,000 people and 7,- 
800,000 of these are unchurched. 

4. In The Rural Sections 

The drift to the citirs and industrial centers, are affecting jural 
life with the result that our country churches are becoming depleted 
and, in many instances, inactive. Five thousand Baptist chuches in 
the country have fewer members than they had ten year.^ ago. Six 
thousand, three hundred had no canven^^ions last year. Three thou- 
sand are without pastors. Four thousand gave nothing to missions. 

5. The Mountain Sections 

In the mountain sections of the territory of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention there are 2,300,000 people. Seventy per cent of these 
are unchurched. Baptists are the stronge':>t denomination an<l yet 
they number only about one to 37 in the mountain sections. 

6. Cuba and Central America 

In Cuba, Panama, and Central America where we are at work, 
there is a population' of something like 12,000,000, with only 0,000 
Baptists, one to every two thousand people. We have one missionary, 
including the wives of workers, to 92,000 people, and one church 
for 160,000 people. 

7. The People Without a Chance 

There are tens of thousand.^ of people living in the territory 
,cf the Southern Baptist Convention today without a chance. They 
are cut off by language barriers, by economic conditions, and by the 
fact that there are no churches anywhere in their reach. The most 
notable examples of these spiritually neglected groups are the ten- 
ant farmers and migrants. 

8. The Negroes 

Our mission work among the Negroeis needs to be doubled and 
trebled. We are now working with the ministers, furnishing Bible 
teachers in colleges and holding institutes for the preachers who 
are not attending college. We have Bible departments in nineteen 
of their colleges. We are holding institutes in co-opei*ation with the 
state organizations in the various states. Last yeai- we contacted 
from 10,000 to 12,000 Negro preachers. 

This brief survey gives only a part of what ought to be done. 



MINUTES OF THE 



The facts mentioned only indicate but do not tell the whole story. 
In our survey we have the names of the places, the amount neces- 
sary to equip eeach mission, the fields we ought to enter, the num- 
ber of people to be served in each field and, taking it all together, 
the Home Mission Board will need in its operating mi5sion budget 
not less than $1,500,000. If we are going to evangelize the unevange- 
lized in the territory of Home Misions fields, we will have to double 
our Home Mission fcrce and greatly increase our budget for equip- 
ment. 

9. Enlarging the Work 

During the past year, the Board added 153 missionaries to it~, 
force, opened 82 mission stations, acquired 54 pieces of mission prop- 
erty. During the year the missionaries distributed ever 29,000 Bibles, 
Testaments, and portions of the Scripture. They gave out more than 
1,900,000 tracts; they delivered over 63,000 sei-mons and addresses; 
they led more than 15,000 people to Christ, and received into the 
fellowship of the churches 11,911 members. The Board employed dur- 
ing the year 654 missionaries who preached the Gospel to the In- 
dians, Mexicans, Spanish-Americans, the Jews, the Italians, the 
French, the Cubans, the Chinese, the Russians the under-privileged 
in the crowded industrial sections and slums of the cities in forty 
of the great cities in the territory of our Convention in rural 
work in co-operation with thirteen state mission boards, to the nvl- 
lions of Negroes in the homeland, the men in the army camps, and 
in Cuba, Panama, and C'csta Rica. 

10. Centennial Evangelistic Crusade . 

The Southern Baptist Convention at its meeting in Atlanta 
charged the Home Mission Board with the responsibility of direct- 
ing the Evangelistic Centennial Ciusade. The Board secured the serv- 
ices of Dr. M. E. Dodd, pastor of the First Baptist church of Shreve- 
pcrt, Louisiana. The church was gracious enough to lend their pas- 
tor to this important task and pay his salary. For this service we 
are profoundly grateful. Dr. Dodd has done a monumental piece of 
work. The entire Convention territory has been organized and the 
united fcrce for the denomination mobilized for this Christ-honoring 
undertaking. 

11. Fulfilling Our Mission 

The Southern Baptist Convention was organized for the purpose 
of missions. One hundred years ago it launched the undertaking. The* 
task they assumed at that time was the evangelization of the home- 
land and the evangelization of the world. These fields, after a hun- 
dred years, are still unoccupied. Millions of people here at home 
have no chance and the world outside of us is without Christ. Sure- 
ly, surely we should give ourselves to this important undertaking. 
As Christ said to His disciples on one occasion, 'Say not unto your- 
selves that two months and then cometh the harvest; I say unto you 
the harvest is already plentiful. Pray ye therefore the Lord of the 
harvest shall send laborers." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. S. O. HINKLE. * 



l.iHKRTY RAPTKST ASSOCIATION 31 



FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

The report on Foreign Missions wai3 prepared by W. H. Connor 
and read by A. L. Snider Associational Clerk in the absence of Rev. 
Connor. 

That They May Have Life— 
A w^ar-weary world is hungry for physical and spiritual bread 
which American Christians can i>upply. Millions have fallen in the 
terrible conflict or have perished from famine. Other missions are 
homeless. We are under inescapable obligation, to a greater degree 
than ever before, to minister to the needy multitudes around the 
globe. We must incarnate in unselfishness service the spirit of the 
good Samaritan. We must follow in the steps of Him who went 
about doing good. 

Great old China, with desolation on every hand, will welcome 
the good news. We shall have unprecedented missionary opportuni- 
ties in that land of more than four hundred million people. We quote 
from a recent description of conditions in the Orient; "Children 
drop by the roadisids in China and die of starvation because there 
is not enough rice to mix with the mud they eat to keep their bellies 
full. Children wondering the highways of India, begging at every or- 
phanage and hospital, waiting before mission stations to see if one 
more handout of wheat or bowl of soup may come." 

Europe is prostrate on the battlefield, now strangely silent after 
years of battle carnage. Spain, Italy, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Rumania, 
the Ukraine, Southern Bapt'ist Mission fields, have desperate need 
of a redemptive ministry which will bind up the broken hearted, pro- 
claim liberty to captivity, comfort all that mourn, preach the gospel 
to the poor. Baptist mission board in European lands will need sym- 
pathetic reinforcement. 

Syria and Palestine in the near East have acute political, eco- 
nomic, and spiritual problems which only the Son of God, not Mo- 
hammed can solve. 

Latin America, largely untouched by the destructive forces of 
war, needs the Living Christ rather than a lifele'?s crucifix. 

Hawaii, the cross roads of the Pacific, has already witnessed 
the power of God in changed lives and spiritual stewardship. This 
is one of the most strategic point.5 on the maps spiritual strategy. 

Southern Baptist now have approximately 540 active missionaries 
under appointment, one to every ten thousand baptist in our mem- 
bership. We are averaging a little above fifty cents per capita for 
Foreign missions. Can we call ourselves Missionary Bapti-st when our 
response in life and money, iis so meager and so insignificant in com- 
parison with the blessings we have received? 

We find from reading our Foreign mission report that many 
country's have suffered the loss of spiritual leadership due to many 
missionaries having to leave their field of work, and from other 
Cduntrys we find that the pastors have stood bravely through all 



MINUTES OF THE 



the difficulties of theese very hard times. Their very low salary 
compelled many of them to run into debt in order to keep their 
lives and those of their children, and still how lean and weak they 
have grown. 

Preachers with experience are needed for pioneer work, doctors, 
both men and women, and nurses to superintend hospitals, clinics, and 
schools of nursincf, nre in great demand. Teachers for Seminaries, 
Bible Schools, College.3 and Universities, High schools and graded 
schools, are wanted at once. Throughout the land numbers of young 
people have come forward and dedicated their lives to definite 
Christian service. Many of these indicate stimulated interest and in- 
crease participation in our mission work. 

"He will not fail or be discouraged, till He has set justice in 
the earth; and the isles shall wait for His law . . . Look unto me, 
and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth; for I am God, and there 
is none else." Isa. 42:4 . . . 45'.22. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. CONNOR. 

33. These reports on the Cooperative Program were discussed 
by Rev. Earl Bradley, a state misisionary, in the absence of the 
State Secretary, Bro. M. A. Huggins. 

He tells us that we are, as Baptist, losing grounds in the East- 
ern part of N. C. to the Catholics and that many Catholic chap- 
lains have recently been established where there are from 1 to 3 
members of the Catholic belief. 

He stated that we, a-s never before, need men and women who 
will accept and put God first in this day of chaos. 

He further stated that we are giving of our pittances in this 
time of distress when God has been so gracious to us. 

Can God count on us as Baptist in these distressing times? 

Benediction for noon recess by Bro. J. W. Dickens to Recon- 
vene at 1:45 P. M. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

34. The. Body was called to order by the Moderator at 1:45 P. 
M. opening song: "Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross" was led by 
Bi'o. Carey Davis. 

Devotion was conducted by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of Denton 
Church. The scripture used was Luke 19:10, and John 6:37, subject 
was "The Cross and Sins". 

REPORT ON WORK OF AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
This report was brought by Rev. F. A. Maier, retired Minister, 

now living in Thomasville. This report was adopted, and this wae 

discussed by Rev. F. A. Maier. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



Because we believe in sending the Bible to the whole world, 
Southern Baptists give to the work of the American Bible Society. 
Every man must have the Bible in his native tongue. Someone must 
translate it into his language, publish it, and send it to him, where- 
ever he may live. 

The Regular Work of the Society includes all these tasks. It is 
a mis'Sionary, non-profit organization, working in cooperation with 
denominational boards. It aido in translation work, publishes the 
scrptures wtihout note or comment, and supplies them at cost, or 
less. In cases of special need, at home or abroad, the Scriptures are 
given without charge. 

The War Emergency Work provides without charge New Testa- 
ments and other Scriptures for our Armed Forces Scriptures in more 
than forty languages for War Prisoners and Refugees, and Scrip- 
tures for the needy people in the liberated areas. 

Southern Baptists recognize the American Bible Society as an 
essential part of their regular program of world-wide missions. The 
Southern Convention and the State Conventions ask the churches 
to contribute to its support. 

During 1944 the Society distrbuted 12,403,541 volumes of Scrip- 
tures. It received a budget income of $1,060,647 and a War Emergency 
fund of $423,010. These records were the largest for any of its 129 
years of service — and yet it. had to leave unanswered more needs 
than in any previous year. 

Vast needs lie ahead for the post-war rehabilitation work. Con- 
servative estimates of emergency needs for a four-year period be- 
ginning July 1, 1944, total 52,932,600. 

Southern Baptists can be counted on to do their full share. 
Through the help of an effective committee in each association and 
the passing of appropriate resolutions. Southern Baptists each year 
can give enough to make a significant increase in world-wide Scrip- 
ture disti'ibution. 

Last year churches in this Association contributed to the Am- 
erican Bible Society. In the coming year let every church con- 
tribute. 

The Demand for Scriptures Since V-Day 
Now that the war is over many obstacles in the way of Scrip- 
tures distribution have been removed. The request for free Scrip- 
tures since V-J Day reveal the following: 

The Chaplains still are requesting Scriptures in about the same 
numbers as during the war. There may be a decrease in their re- 
quests during the next twelve months, but the large armies of oc- 
cupation indicate that the Chaplains will be requesting Scriptures 
for some time to come. 

Second, the demand fcr Scriptures on the part of foreign pris- 
oners of war has been and continues to be unexpectedly heavy. One 
Chaplain in making his request stated he could place 500 German 



34 



Bibles that very morning and not get half way through the camp. 
In fact, the Scriptures for prisoners of war amount to more than 
four timei3 the number anticipated. It will be more than twelve 
months before all these will be released by the United States. 

The third need for Scriptures is in the liberated countries. In- 
cluded in this item is Germany itself, where the churches, now lib- 
era:ted, are requesting the Scriptures as the most effective instrument 
for winning back the German people to peaceful living. The appeal 
in all liberated countries is tremendous. 

The fourth area is the Far East. The Scriptures are being pre- 
pared for the Philippines in most of the 16 languages at a cost of 
over $80,000. 25,000 Korean New Testaments have been prepared 
although the need is said to be ten times this number. The Scriptures 
for Japan will be the most potent mes-sage we have to give these 
unhappy people. In China the immediate demand for Scriptures for 
their soldiers presents a gigantic task. 

The type of Bible distributed is the accepted Protestant ver- 
sion. We are counting on the churches and denominational funds for 
one-third o* the needed Scriptures. The rest muGt come from in- 
dividuals and interested groups. $2,000,000 of the $3,000,000 are still 
to be raised. We cannot escape the responsibility to supply these 
Scriptures because the United States through the American Bible 
Society will be the only available rsource for the next three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 
F. A. MAIER. 

36. REPORT ON iMUSIC 

This report was brought by Bro. Carey Davis of Abbotts Creek 
Church, in the absence of Bro. W. B. Lord of the Mills Home. 

Bro. Davis gave us some splendid suggestions for our church 
choirs, and after his remarks rendered special numbers. "Jesus Lover 
of My Soul," "Where He Leads Me I Will Follow," "Must Jesus Bear 
The Cross Alone," "There \ y a Fountain Filled with Blood." 

The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON RELIEF AND ANNUITY 

This report was prepared and brought by Bro. Sam J. Smith, of 
the First Church Lexington. 

The relief and Annuity Board was organized in 1918. 

No agency fostered by The Southern Baptist Convention has 
made such progress during the last few years as has the Relief and 
Annuity Board. The denomination is to be most highly commended 
for thie. But we were due no credit for waiting all too many years 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION' 



33 



before we came to realize our duty to our aged and disabled min- 
isters. To them was and is due the credit for building the Baptist 
Denomination in the Southland. To them we owe security, when 
old age and disability overtakes them. 

As late as 1910 the average salary of Baptist pastors was only 
$344.00 per annum in the Southern Convention. On this amount they 
could save little or nothing. 

Old age or d'sability brought insecurity, worry, want and often 
suffering. 

But it is different now. The Relief and Annuity Board has 
worked out a plan with each one of the State Conventions compos- 
ing the Southern Baptist Convention, whereby each pastor and hie 
church can co-operate together in building a substantial retirement 
for our pastors. 

The income of the Board in 1944 was well over two million dol- 
lars, which was three times as great as it was in 1939. The total as- 
sets of the Board is now around eight and one-half million dollars. 

ReKcf and annuity benefits paid cut in 1944 was nearly $800,- 
000.00. Th"3 amount wfis paid to 1G47 retired ministers, widows and 
other retired denominational workers. 

The relief and annuity board offers a plan for retirement to 
every salaried employee in our entire denominational working force. 
No church is too small to work out a retirement plan for its pastor, 
when the pastor wants to co-operate. 

On March 1, 1945, 3923 pastors and 11,362 churches were mem- 
bers of the Convention's retirement plan. 

As best I could determine from the 1944 minutes of this Asso- 
ciation the following churches and their pastors were members of 
the Convention's retirement plan in 1944. 

Abbotts Creek, Carolina Avenue, Center Hill, Churchland, Er- 
langer, Denton, HoUoways, Jersey, Lexington, Liberty, Mills Home, 
Oak Hill Memorial, Reeds, Rich Fork, Sheets Memorial, Smith Grove, 
Stoners Grove, Thomasville and Wallburg. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAM J. SMITH. : 

The report was adopted. 

Bro. W. K. McGee suggested that the relief annuity be brought 
to those churches who are not participating in the program. 

At this time Bro. Hoyt Blackwell of Mars Hill College was given 
some time to speak regarding the college. 

He told us that Mars Hill College turned away more than two 
hundred boys and girls, also that they expect to start an expansion 
program in the coming spring to take care of the student body by 
next year. 



^6 



MlNrTKS OF THE 



38. REPORT OF COMMITTEES ^ 
Report on Time, Place and Preacher. 

Your committee on Time, Place and Preacher, Recommends the 
following: 

Time: Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in Sep- 
tember 1946. 

Place: Baptist Church, Denton, N. C. 
Annual sermon, J. Roy Clifford. 

Alternate Preacher: Rev. E. C. Roach ' 
Respectfully submitted, 

SAM J. SMITH : ■ , 

R. C. WALL 
■ MRS. PAUL PALMER 

ROBBINS BEAN 

39. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE PERSONS 

TO BRING THE REPORTS NEXT YEAR 

Your committee recommends the following persons to make re- 
ports on the following objects of our Denominational work at our 
Associational meeting in 1946. 

Christian Literature Rev. J. A. McMillian 

Baptist Hospital Mr. G. W. Miller 

State Missions Rev. John F. Jarrett 

Home Missions _ Mrs. R. S. Greer 

Foreign Missions _. Mr. R. D. Covington 

Christian Education „ John Reid 

Relief and Annuity Mr. C. F. Motsinger 

Orphanage ; Cloyd Philpott 

Music -- Mr. Carey Davis 

Public Morals Sam J, Smith 

. American Bible Society Rev. C. V. Talbert • 

Sunday School _ Mr. Marvin Hedrick 

Training Union Mrs. Austin Sink 

W. M. U. Mrs. Carroll Wall 

State of Churches Rev. B. A. Mitchel 

Respectfully submitted 
E. C. ROACH 

C. S. YOUNG 

J. W. DICKENS "- ' . 

D. S. HAYWORTH 
MRS. S. 0. HINKLE 

MISS SALLIE Mccracken 

, 40. report on FINANCE 

1. The committee wishes to commend the clerk of the associa- 
tion for the judicious way he handled the finances pertaining to 



T.IBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



the Association for the past year in that he was able to report a 
small balance on hand in spite of limited funds. 



2. Financial Report 

Balance on hand — Minute Fund ' ' 

August 31, 1945 _ :.'..„.....$ 5.93 

Balance of special offering of 1944 19.29 



Total Balance _ $25.22 

Receipts 1945 

Minute Fund 1945 .! , $295.70 

Special Collection .. :.. 29.47 

Total „ $325.17 



Grand Total as of Sept. 26, 1945 :.. $325.17 

1.25 



$350.39 

3. Recommendations: (1) That after all expenses of this Asso- 
iation (1945) are paid out of the special offering, the balance be 
combined with the minute fund. (2) That due to the increased work 
and expense of the clerk of thv Association, his compensation be 
increased from $50.00 to $75.00. 

Respectful! submitted 
' _ - W. K. McGEE 

V. W. SEARS 
D. S. HAYWORTH 
MRS. AUSTIN SINK 
MRS. V. L. ANDREWS 

41. REPORT OF RESOLUTION COMMITTEE 
The following resolution was offered and adopted: 

The committee on resolutions of the Libert Baptist association 
wishes to extend to the Jersey Baptist Church, the oldest church in 
our Association, deep gratitude for the hospitality displayed in the 
cordial welcome extended and the abundant and delicious meals. 
Thanks to its able pastor and the noble women of the church. 
Respectfully submitted. 
REV. J. A. COX, 
MRS. G. E. MOREFIELD 
R. L. KIZER 
L. C. CARRICK 
D. L. TYSINGER 

42. REPORT ON OBITUARIES 

The Association standing in honor of the members, who have 
died during the last year. 



38 



MINIITKR OF THE 



The list was read by J. A. Neilson, pastor of Mills Hotne. 

OUR HOME GOERS 

Who Have Answered The Roll Call Since Our Last Session 
' "In My Father's House Are Many Mansions, 
I Go to Prepare A Place For You." — John 14:2. 
ABBOTTS CREEK — Mrs. Palmeta Weir, Mrs. Dora Motsinger, Mrs. 

Alley Williams. 
CAROLINA AVE.— Mr. Billy Gilliam, Mr. Dallas Lewder. 
CENTER HILL— Mr. Marcellous Gallimore. 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. G. R. Sharpe, Mrs. Joe Reid, Mr. O. A. Grubb, 

Mr. John Barnes, Mns. J. P. Barnes. 
DENTON— Mvs. James I. Snider, Mrs. A. H. Gallimore, Mrs. Cicero 

Morris, Mr. T. H. Daniel, Mr. Charlie Gallimore (armed 

forces) 
ERLANGER— None. 
HOLLOWAY —Mr. Enoch F. Crook. 
HIGH ROCK MISSION— None. 
JERSEY— Mrs. D. C Sharpe. 

LEXINGTON — Capt. James W. Hartzog (armed forces), Mrs. Emma 
B. Olive, Ens. Elton C. Craver (armed forces), Sgt- Ocko 
Picket (armed forces), Mr. Robert Parker, Mrs. Spurgeon 
Ayers" MistS Adoska Welborn, Mrs. Alex Lanning. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. Mintie Lambeth, Mrs. Fannie Coman, Mr. F. F. 
Lopp, Mrs. E. L. Hepler, Mr. C. C. Lambeth. 

LICK CREEK— Mr. John Carroll, Mr. Lindsay Feezor, Mrs. Lewis 
Rogers. 

MILLS HOME— None. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW — None. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Mary Jane Cranford, Mr. L. Henry 

Wilson. •. . • 

OAK HILL MEMORIAL— None. 
PLEASANT PLAINS— None. 

REEDS— Mr. W. W. Myers, Sgt. Hill Michael (armed forces) 
REID STREET— None 
RICH FORK— None. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mr. Audrey Bell, Mr. Ralph Foster. 
SMITH GROVE— None. 
SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Ada Scarlet. 
STONER'S GROVE— Miss Mary Moteinger. 
SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. Lantie Smith, Mr. Webster Gallimore. 
TAYLOR'S GROVE— Rev. C. B. Reid (pastor). 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. E. M. Batten, Mr. J. W. Bennett, Mrs. W. 

H. DickinP, S/Sgt. Paul Gantt, Mr. Glen Kinney, Cpl. Dolon 
Rodgers, Mrs. J. W. Spoolman, Mr. N. S. Walters. 

WALLBURG— Mrs. Cassie Smith* D. R. Yokely. 

WALTER'S GROVE— None. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



WEST END MISSION— None. 

Eight in Armed Forces. 

J. A. NEILSON, Chm. 

THOS. B. FLOWE, 

D. L. OWENS, 

MRS. ALTA GRAVER, 

MRS. C. S. HAYNES, Com. 

After the reading of the names the Body was led in prayer by 
Rev. T. B. Flowe, pastor of South Side Baptist Church. 

43. CLOSING MESSAGE ^ 

The message was by Rev. R. Knolan Benfield on "Our Churches 
Continuing Their Evangelistic Efforts." The message was in the 
form of a challenge for better service as Christians. 

Then there was a motion to adjourn. 

A song was sung, led by Bro. Carey Davis, "Blest Be the Tie 
That Binds." 

Benediction by Rev. W. K. McGee. 

REV N. C. TEAGUE A L. SNIDER 

Moderator ' Clerk and Treasurer. 

MINUTES OF AUXILIARY MEETINGS 

Following are the minutes cf the Associational W. M. U., and 
Sunday School meetings held at times other than that of the As- 
sociation, and which were adopted to be included in the Minutes of 
the Association. 



MINUTES OF 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

of 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The Annual Meeting of Woman's Missionary Union was held 
April 11, 1945 at New Friendship Church. The meeting was called 
to order at 10:00 A.M. by the Superintendent, Mrs, N. C. Teague. 

The day's program was based on the hymn for the year, "Lead 
on, O King EternaK'. 

Mrs. Romulus Skaggs was appointed to serve as secretary 
pro-tem. 

The following was carried out: 

Theme: "Lead On, King Eternal'' 

1. Hymn— "Lead On, King Eternal" 

2. Meditation — "Thy Cross is Lifted O'er 



40 MINUTKS OF THE 



Attention was called to an electric lighted cross as Mrs. 
C. C. Wall isang, " Beneath the Cross of Jesus." and Mrs. B. 
K. Mason led in prayer. 

3. Devotional "The Crown Awaits the Conquest" was led 
by Mrs. J. Roy Clifford who read Deut. 31:1-8 and discussed 
Joshua's commission. 

4. Greetings were extended by Mrs. S. 0. Hinkle, New 
Friendship church. Response was given by Mrs. Mary Green 
Matthews of the First Church Thomasville. 

5. Business Session — During this session the superintend- 
dent recognized the following visitors: 

Miss Hattie Gai'dner, Africa 

Miss Helen Keller, W. M. U. Office 

Mrs. B. K. Mason, Divisional Supt. 

Mrs. H. A. Knight, Mission Study Leader 

The following pastors were welcomed: V. W. Sears, V. 
L. Andrews and wife, A. C. Lovelace, J. A. Neilson, and N. C 
Teague. 

The following committee were appointed: 

Resolutions: Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, Miss Sallie McCracken, 
and Mrs. A. F. Warfford. 

Time and Place: Mrs. Conrad Myers, Mrs Daisy Spurgeon, 
and Mrs. R. S. Green. 

Nominating: Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Mrs. J. B. Powell, Mrs. 
A. G. McCormick, Mrs. W. K. McGee. and Mrs. T. H. Mills. 

6. "We Follow, not With Fears." Under this subject Mrs. 
C. C. Wall led a very beautiful and impressive memorial service 
in memory of these members who have been called home: Mrs. 
Lois Hart Gaines, Lexington, Mrs. Emma B. Olive, Lexington, 
Mrs. A. Z. Boles, Thomasville, Mrs. C. C Smith, Wallburg, 
Mrs. J. P. Barnes, Churchland. 

7. "Thy Grace Has Made Us Strong" Under this subject 
reports were given. 

Reports of standing committees: 

Mission Study report was given by the Chairman Mrs. A. G. 
McCormick. Number classes held, 124 With 964 awards given. She 
Urged us to Study more, Know more, and Do more about Missions. 

Stewardi^hip Report was given by the Chairman, Mrs. P. M. 
Hendricks. 

Tithers: W. M. S. Y. W. A. G. A. R. A. • Sunbeams Total 
242 30 95 52 94 513 

Stewardship classes held, 8 
Mrs. Hendricks urged that the tithes be the minimum basis of 
our giving. She gave an encouraging report of increase in number 
of tithers. 

Community Missions Report: Mrs. Reid Smith, Chairman urged 
that we enlist women and young people in the work of winning aouls, 



MBIOUTY IJAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



that we study the Guide to Community Missions", and that we en- 
deavor to show icrth Christ and His Icve in our daily contacts with 
others, "Two Wi.i One." 

Literature Chairman, Mrs. J. N. Shockey gave her report in an 
interesting way. Biblical recorders 199, Royal Service, 226, Y. W .A. 
Windows, 63, Wcrld Comrades, 160. 

Superintendent's Annual Report: Mrs. Teague presented her re- 
port in a mimeograph form. 

Honor Roll 

W. M. S. — (A-1) Lexington 1st, New Friendship: (B) Erlanger, 
Wallburg; (C) Jersey, Reeds, Thcmasville 1st. 

Y. W. A. — (A-1) Erlanger, Lexington 1st, New Friendship; (B) 
Thomasville. 

G. A. — (A-1) Lexington 1st (Intermediate and Junior); Mills 
1 Home (Page, Lockett, Naomi Schell) New Friendship 

(Junior and Intermediate) Thomasville (Junior and 

Intermediate.) 

(B) Abbotts Creek (Victory) Mills Home (Grayson), 

Reeds, Intermediate). 
R. A. — (A-1) Lexington 1st (Junior), New Friendship (Junior 

and Intermediate) Reeds (Livingstone.) - (B) Reeds 

(Judson), Wallburg (Negrin) (C) Erlanger (Truitt.) 
S. B.— (A-1) Lexington 1st; (B) Jersey; (C) Reeds. 

Fully Graded Unions 

Abbotts Creek ' New Friendship 

Erlanger Lexington 1st Thomasville 1st 

HoUoways Mills Home Reid Street 

Special Meetings 
January 5t.h. Executive Committee meeting. 
January 25th. Leadership Conference (Lexington 1st) 
March 23rd. Executive Planning meeting. 
April 18th. Annual meeting (Thomasville 1st) 
April 18th. Annual meeting (Thomasville 1st) 
September 24-29. Association Schools of Missions. 
November 12th. Young People's Rally (Mills Home) 

Special Mention 
Lexington 1st A-1, Fully Graded. , 

New Friendship A-1, fully graded for 11 consecutive years. 
Mills Home and New Friendship receive a Missionary gift from 
every resident woman church member. 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

Co-operative Program 5,782.84 

Other objects : 6.272.86 



Total . $12,055.69 

We made more than our goal for the year. Reached 10 points of 
the StJiidard of Excellence. 

Treasurer's Report (for past 3 years) 
1942 

RECEIPTS: 

In Treasury January 1, 1942 $23.61 

Received during 1942 36.97 



TOTAL $60.58 $60.58 



42 



MINUTES OF THE 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Divisional Expense Fund $ 5.00 

Young People's Leader, Mrs. Teague 7.00 

Superintendent's Expense, Mrs. Gaines — - 20.00 

Associational Speaker i- 2 00 

Young People's Rally 1.00 



TOTAL - - — - - 135.00 $35.00 



BALANCE in Treasury— January 1, 1943 |25.58 

1943 

RECEIPTS: 

In Treasury January 1, 1943 $25.58 •' ' 

Received during 1943 ....„ 35.60 



TOTAL $61.18 $61.18 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Expenses for Mrs. Mason $ 5,00 

Superintendent's Expense, Mrs; Gaines - 12.00 

Young People's Leader Expense, Miss Council — 5.00 

Margaret Fund Chairman, Mrs. Jennings — — 3.00 

Superintendent's Expense, Mrs. Gaines - 11.00 , ' 

Divisional Expense _. 5.00 

Young People's Leader Expense, Miss Council 4.00 

Superintendent's Expense — Mrsi Teague 5.00 



TOTAL $50.00 $50.00 



BALANCE in Treasury January 1, 1944 $11.18 

1944 

RECEIPTS: 

In Treasury January 1, 1944 $11.18 

Received During 1944 24.55 , . 

Offering for World Relief 26.46 

Mrs. Fletcher Wall 77 



TOTAL $62.96 $62.96 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

To Mr. Huggins for World Relief $26.46 

Printing Programs 1.50 ^ ■ 

Speakers lt.t CTiurch Thomasville, Miss Lawton 5.00 , s. 

Superintendent's Expense — Mrs. Teague 15.00 

Divisional Expense, Mrs. Hauser 5.00 

Young People's Leader 5.00 

Superintendent's Expense 5.00 



TOTAL $62.96 $62.96 



BALANCE in Treasury January 1, 1946 $00.00 

Seventeen society presidents responded to the roll call and gave 
reports of their work. Seventeen churches were represnted with 
91 present. 

8. "Henceforth in Fields of Conquest". Address by Miss Ruth 
Keller, State W. M. U. Representative — Her message wae 
a challenge to all present. 



I.IBKKTV BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



4;; 



9. Hymn — "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross" , 
Announcements were in regard to lunch, etc. 

10. Hymn — "With Deeds of Love and Mercy" — Address by Miss 

Hattie Gardner — Missionary from Africa — Her message 
was heart stirring to all. 

Lunch 

11. Hymn — "Hail to the Brightness" was the opening song for 
the. afternoon session. 

12. Devotional was led by Mrs. J. L. Ward, Jr., who used as her 
subject, "The Sweet Amen of Peace." 

13. "Through Days of Preparation" under this subject Mrs. R. 

G. Jennings gave the report of the W. M. U. Training School 
and Margaret Fund. 

14. "Lead on in the Training of Youth" Under the direction of 
our Ycung People's Leader, Miss Beatrice Council, the 
Young People's Work was presented in the form of a legend. 

Those taking part were: Frances Little, Doris Honeycutt, Mrs. 
L. B. Mocre, Group of Sunbeams of New Friendship Church, Nancy 
and Nell Ilaynes, Bobbie Lee Brigge, Nolan Teague, Rev. N. C. Tea- 
gue, Helen Glascoe, and Jewell Benfield. 

At the close of the Young People's Hodr Miss Council gave a 
brief repcrt of her work. 

IB. Committee Reports: 
Resolutions: 

Having enjoyed a day cf sweet Chri->tian fellowship with the 
women of the Liberty W. M. U. we offer the following resolutions: 

(1) . That we express to the New Friendship Church our sincere 
appreciation and thanks for the hearty welcome and the kind hos- 
pitality extended to us here today; and for the lovely flowers that 
have added so much to the beauty of the church. 

(2) . That we express our appreciation to Mrs. N. C. Teague, our 
Supt., the program committee, and the other offiCero, for the work 
they have ddne during the day, and for planning and presenting such 
an inspirational program here today. 

(3) . That we express our heartfelt thanks to our State worker, 
Miss Ruth Keller, to our Missionary speaker, Miss Hattie Gardner, 
and to our Associational Paistor, Rev. J. Roy Cliffoi'd for their 
inspiratinal messages. 

(4) . That we express to Mrs. B. K. Mason, Our beloved Division- 
al Supt.. our appreciation of her presence here and that we pray 
God's blessings upon her as she continues to serve. Also to Mrs. 
H. A. Knight we say we appreciate her presence and efforts in 
Mission Study. , 

(5) . That we say "Thank You" to all those who have had any 
part in making this a day in which we have been uplifted and, made 



44 



MINUTES OF THE 



to realize our responsibility in carrying on the Lord's work in our 
Assocation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Mrs. A. F. Warfford, 
Mrs. B. A. Mitchell. 
This was unanimously adopted. 

Tim<* and Place 

The W. M. U. of Liberty Association will meet in April 1946 — 
with Rich Fork Baptist Church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Conrad Myers, 
Mrs. R. S. Green. 

Nominating 

Superintendent — Mrs. N. C. Teague, Route 3, Lexington, N. C. 
Associate Supt. — Mrs. L G. Greer, Mills Home, Thomasville, 
N. C. 

Sec'y. and Treas. — Mrs. F. H. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

Young People's Leader — Miss Beatrice Council, Mills Home, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mi-s. C. B. Atkinson, Ei'langer, N. C. 

Community Chairman — Mrs. Reid Smith, Route 6, Lexington, 
N. C. 

Literature Chairman — Mrs. J. N. Shockey, Mills Home, Thom- 
•asville, N. C. 

Training School -- Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 

Stewardship Chairman — Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 

R. A. Leader — Rev. N. C. Teague, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C. 

Inter-racial Chairman — Mrs. C- C. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

The above were unanimously elected for two years. 

16. Clcsing message — "She that Winneth Souls is Wise." — 
Rev. J. Roy Clifford, pastor First Church, Lexington, brought a very 
challenging message on this subject and laid on our hearts the im- 
portance of winning souls — at the close of his message he led us 
in a closing prayer. 

We adjourned to meet next April with the women of Rich Fork 
Baptist Church. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST TRAINING 
UNION ASSOCIATION 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its regular 
meeting October 29, 1944 with the First Church, Lexington. Mrs. 
Austin Sink, presiding. 

The meeting opened with quiet music and song service led by 
Carey J. Davis. Rev. B. A. Mitchell conducted the devotionals. 



IJBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



4.-. 



There was 207 present with 14 churches represented. Southside 
won the Attendance Banner with First Church, Lexington and Reid 
Street tying for second. 

A nominating- committee, composed of Rev. B. A. Mitchell, chair- 
man, Mrs. M. D. Woodleif and Mr. Elmo Woodleif reported the fol- 
lowing: 

Director — Mrs. Aui3tin Sink. 

Associate Director — H. L. Banks, Sr. . < _ 

Secretary-Trc usurer — Miss Lucille Hayworth. 

Chorister — Carey J. Davis. 

Pianist — M'ss Wanna Faye Lawes. 

Paster-Adviser — Rev. C. B. Atkineon. 

Adult Leader — Rev. A. C. Lovelace. 

Young People's Leader — Miss Dorcus Clinard. 

Intermediate Leader — Miss Edith Jarrett. 

Junior Leader — Miss Pauline Gilliam 

Story Hour Leader — Mrs. J. W. Byars. 

Group Leaders: 

No. 1— B. L. West. 

No. 2— J. B. Powell 

No. 3— A. L Snider 

Special music was rendered by the Mills Home Trio. 

Department conferences were conducted by associational officers 
with "Correct Organization and Enlargement" as the theme. 

The Inspirational message was delivered by Harvey T. Gibson, 
State Training Union Director of Raleigh. 

The meeting adjourned to hold its next meeting with First 
Church, Lexington. 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Director. 

Miss Lucille Hayworth, Secretary. 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its regular 
meeting December 31, 1944 with the First Church, Lexington. Mrs. 
Austin Sink presiding. 

The meeting opened with quiet music and song service led by 
Miss Wanna Faye Lawe?. Rev. C. S. Young conducting the devo- 
tionals. 

There was 79 present with 10 churches i*epresented. First 
Church, Lexington won the attendance banner with Center Hill in 
second place. 

Special music was furnis^ied by the Young People's Choir of 
First Church, Thomasville under the direction of Mrs. Clyde Dubose, 
accompanied at the piano by Miss Wanna Faye Lawes. 

Department conferences with "Soul Winning in 1945" as the 
theme was conducted by the following officers: 

General Officers — Pastors — Rev. V. W. Sears. 

Adults — H. L. Banks, Sr. 



in 



MTNUTKS 'OF' THE 



■" Young People — Miss Dorciis CHhard: 
Junioi' Leader — Miss Pauline Gilliam. 

Intermediates — Miss Elizabeth Smith. » • ^ 

Juniors— Miss Mabel Hepler. ' ' 

' ' Story Hour — Mrs. Genette Boyles. * 

The Inspirational Message was delivered by Rev. J. Roy Clifford. 

The meeting adjourned to hold its next meeting with Abbotts 
Creek Church. 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Director. 

Miss Lucille Hayworth, Secretary. . 

The Liberty Associational Training Union held its regular meet- 
ing March 18, 1945, with Abbotts Creek Church. Mrs. Austin Sink, 
presiding. ! , • 

The meeting was opejied vvith quiet music and song service led 
by Carey J. Davis with Miss Wanna Faye Lawes at the piano. Rev. 
B. A. Mitchell conducting the devotionals. 

There was 150 present with eleven churches represented, Reid 
Street won the attendance banner and Wallburg came second. 

Special music was furnished by the Abbotts Creek Choir.^ 

The Elimination Contest was held in the Better Speakers Tour- 
nament, Sword Drill, and Junior Memory Work conducted by Miss 
Dorcufi Clinai'd, Miss Elizabeth Smith and Miss Pauline" Gilliam with 
the following winning: 

Young People's Better Speakers Tournament — Bill Everhart, 
First Church, Lexington. 

Intermediate Sword Drill — Charlotte Bell, Jersey. 

Junior Memory Work — Laura Kay McGee, First Church, 
Thomasville. 

A playlett "Eight Waye to Grow" was presented by the Con- 
querors Union, First Church, Thomasville under the supervision of 
Mrs. Hoyle Clinard, union leader. 

The meeting adjourned to hold its next meeting with Reid Street 
Church. 

Mrs. Austin Sink, Director. 
Miss Lucille Hayworth, Secretary 

The Lil?erty Associational Training Union held ite regular meet- 
ing June 24, 1946 with Reid Street Church. H. L. Banks, Sr. presiding. 

.The meeting was opened with quiet music and song service. Rev. 
.C^, ^. Aj^kinson conducting the devotionals. 

There was . 73 present with 5 churches represented. Reid Street 
^ .won „the attendanjoe banner with First Churchy Lexington eecond. 
Special music was rendered by the Reid Street Trio. 
The Inspirational Message "Going On with Our (jeniennial Cru- 
sade" was delivered by Dr. W. K. McGe«. 



I^IBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Mrs. Austin Sink, Director. 

Miss Lucille Haywcrth, Secretary 

bv r r'^'"^ "P"""^ ^"'^^^ and sons service led 

Southside. Reid S re" Tnd ' Chth T ' ''f'' 

wa, tred^rrA:ratvi:r ^^^^ 

sisted by the following: H. L Banks Jr Mi' n l^" 
Beulah Lannin., Mise'patty MecTstlil and Mrs.^-'^-^By ^s"'' ''"^ 
Specal music wa, rendered by soloist, Mr. Marvfn Connell 

The meeting adjourned with prayer. ^""ord. 



4S 



MTNUTJ'IS OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Y»ar 


WHERE HELD PREACHER 


MODERATOR 


CLERK 




18^2 


. 1 Jimrstown 


-G^o. W. Purefoy 


.. Wm. Bnrch 


Peter 


Owen 




I8n 


. Holloways 


Josiah Wistman 


... Eli Carroll _ 


Peter 


Owen 




1814... 


Abbous Crrek 


-Eli Carroll 






Owen 




1855 _ 


Libtrry 




bli Carroll 


Peter 


Owetj 




18 36... 


Jffsfy 


.IM Carroll 


...F.li Carroll 


Peter 


Owen 




18 3 7.;. 


Lick Crftk 




....Eli Carroll ...... 


Peter 


Owen 




18 38... 


AbboKs Crfjk ... 


.Benjamin Lanier . 


-..Eli Carroll 


Peter 


Owen 




1 839... 


2 Pin* M«t. H. 


Eli Carroll . 


...Eli Carroll 


Peter 


Owen 




1840... 


Holloways 




...Eli Carroll 


Peter 


Owen 




1841... 


New Friendship 


Brnjamin Lanier 


Gershom Tussey 


Peter 


Owen 




1 842... 


R»»d5 X Roads 


Barton Roby 


. Benjamin Lanier 


Azari, 


jh Williar 


ns 


1843... 


Lick Cretk 


Benjamin Lanier' .. 


— Benjamin Lanier 


Azari 


ah Williar 


ns 


1 844 .. 


Abbotts Crttk.- 


Wm. Turner 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azari 


ih Williar 




1 845... 


. Jersrv . 


Alfred Kinney 


..-■Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 



1 846 ... Lick Creek Wm. Turner L.-.Btnjimin Lanier 

1 847 ... Abbotts Creek ....Wm. Turner Benjamin Lanier 

1 848.... Reeds X Roads ..Benjamin L-nier Benjamin Lanier 

1849__3 Big Creek Azariah Williams ' ... Ben jamin Lanier 

1850....I Jamestown Benjamin L-nier Benjamin Lanier 

18S1 . Liberty _Wm. Turner Wm. Turner 

1 8 52.... Holloways Z- Minor Wm. Turner .... 

1 8 53 .. Abbotts Crtek .Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier 

1 8 54 ... Reeds X Roads Alfred Kinney Joseph Spurgeon 

1 8 5 5 ... Lick Creek Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier 

1 856... Abbotts Creek ...Unknown Benjamin Lanier 

1 8 57 ... Reeds X Roads .Wm. Lambeth Amos Weaver .... 



1 858 ... Holloways Amos Weaver Amos Weaver Azariah Williams 

1 859 . New Friendship. Ben pamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

I860.... Abbotts Creek . Wm. Turner - ...Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

1861... Jersey J. B. Jackson _ .'.. J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1 862.... Lick Crtek F. H. Jones J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1 863... Abbotts Creek .T. W. Tobey J. B. Jackson Azariah Williams 

1864 ... Thomasville W. H. Hammer _ Benjamin Lanier Azariah Williams 

► 865 ... No session held.On account of .Conditions caused By Civil War 

1 866.... Lick Creek W. T. Waters Benjamin Lanier _ J. H. Owen 

1 867 ... Abbotts Creek ..Benjamin Lanier Benjamin Lanier J. H. Owen 

1868.... Jersey W. H. Hammer Benjamin Lanier H. Owen 

1869.... Abbotts Creek .A. P. Stokes Wm. Turner __.J. H. Owen 

1870-.3 Big Creek Wm. Turner Wm. Turner J. H. Owen 

1871....2 Pine Meet. H...W. M. Wingate . Wm. Turner — .J. H. Owen 



...Azar-ah Williams 

...Azariah Williams 

....Aiiariah Williams 

Azariah Williams 

. Azariah Williams 

....Azariah Williams 

Azariah Williams 

....Azariah Williams 

...Azariah Williams 

....Azariah Williams 

....Azariah Williams 

....Azariah Williams 



1 872 ... New Friendship .H. Morton :.....J. H. Brooks ..J. L. Pleasant 

1 873.. Holloways Thcmas Carrick H. Morton „ Thomas Carrick 

1874 ... Lick Creek ....A. F. Reid Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1875....4 Muddy Creek ..C. T. Bailey Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1 876 ... Reeds X Road . H. W. Reinhart Wm. Turner Thomas Carrick 

1 877.... High Point J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner _ Henry Sheets 

1 878 ...3 Big Creek _ H. W. Reinhart .... H. W. Reinhart _ Henry Sheets 

1 8 79.... Liberty Harvey Hatcher H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1880 ... Holloways S. F. Conrad H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1881.... Jersey Henry Sheets H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1882. ...4 Muddy Creek ..S. H. Thompson ...H. W .Reinhart Henry Sheets 

1 88 3....2 Pine Meet. H...0. F. Gregory H. W. Reinhart Henry Sheets 



1884 



Summerville S. H. Thompson Wm. Turner 



.Henry Sheets 



1 88 5.... Lexington J. B. Richardson .Wm. Turner . 

1 886.... Abbotts Creek _J. B. Richardson Wm. Turner . 

1 887.... Lick Creek _ Henry Sheets James Smith 

18 88.... Reeds X Roads . C. Durham Wm. Turner 

1889.... New Friendship ..W. F. Watson Jamv Smith 

1 890.... Jersey _..J. M. Bennett James Smith 

I 892....2 Pint Meet. H. J- K. Fant „ James Smith 

1 892 ... High Point Henry Sheets _ James Smith 

1 893. — Kernersville R- T. Bryan _ --James Smith 

1894.... Holloways R. Vandeventer _ James Smith 

1 89 5 — Pleasant GroTe .-J. H. Hilliard James Smith 

1896.... Denton Henry Sheets James Smith 

1897_.5 Piney GtoT* .....W. H. Rich James Smith 

1891 — Rich Fork J. H. Lambtth James Smith 



Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

.Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Ytar 

1899 

1900. 

1901. 

1902 

1901. 

1904 

I 90 5. 

1906 

1 907. 

1908 

1 909. 

1910.. 

1911.. 

1912.. 

191}. 

I9M. 
1915.. 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1918.. 
1919.. 
1920.. 
19 2 1.. 
1 9 22.. 
1 923.. 
1924- 
1 925 . 
1 926- 
1 927.. 
1928.. 

1929 . 

1 930.. 
1931.. 
19 32.. 
193 J.. 
19 34.. 
1 93 5... 
1 936... 
H3 7... 
1 938... 
1 939... 



1940. 
1941. 
1942. 
1943. 
1944. 
1945. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



Smith 
Smith 

Smith ^ 

' — - I^""" Smith ..r.^u^nrv Shf 



Abbotts Crfek . S. B. WiUon Umej 

R»fd, X Ro»d,.W. H. Rich j';^" 

Ux.ngton _ r. A. G. Thom« .J.mc, 

Lick Creek Henry Sheet 

Pin?" Meet "- h T' ^^u"\. --■ J''"^" Sm.'t'h 

K!::a.i!i.5x - i:::: -us 

K?;Su;r"--.::::^>rA.^^v,„„ 

Dfnton ...M. L. Kesler 



CLERK 



— Henry Sheets 

— Henry Sheets 
-Henry Sheets 
-"'nry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

Henry Sheets 

M-nry Sheets 

P. S. Vann 

Liberty S. D. Swjim H c^u""" - 

orph,n,„e Zo. A. kI]',? l\::v.'. z- x-" 



W. Nowell 
W. Nowell 



Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 



Sheets 



"o a' "'"'y Sheet, 

\i ^ V '." Sheet, 
-M. L. Kesler Henry Sheet, 



Holloway, 
Center Hill 
WjllbutR 
Smith Grov 
Lexington .. 
Denton 



New Frtend,hip 

Churchland fj\ 

Summerville w 

Abbotts Creek . w 

Reed, _Q 

Liberty _q 

Rich Fork g 

Thomajville H 



G. A. Martin _ 

0. A. Keller _ 

1. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler . 

E. White 



Var 
-P. S. Var 
-P. S. Var 
-P. 5. Var 

-Henry Sheets 



G. A. Martin 

g- ^ l^.ller Henr; S^.Wl 

J^'"" Henry Sheets 

„• i - Henry Sheet, 

„• - -Archibald Johnson 

R - Archibald Johnson 

R t - Archibald Johnson 

HouRh R. S g":: - Archibald Johnson 

Barr, ...Archibald Johnson " ^ "^ZIZ 

Trneblood ....Archibald Johnson Sam I I 

O-- AKhibalcl Johnson Z^Z J.' S^i.^ 

Sam J. Smith 



S. Hardaway 



Holloway, 



L. Ke,l 
A. 
L. 
H. 
A. 

N. Gardner Archibald Johnson 

T. Penry ._ Archibald Johnson 

-M. L. Kesler Archibald . Johnjon 



-Sam J. Smith 
.Sam J. Smith 



Hay, 



Stoner, Grove .._J. M 

Lexington r. 

Lick Creek 



O. Alexander 
-G. A. Afartin .. 

'"-r - --^w/l. wSd 

■E. C. Roach .... 



.Sam J. Smith 
.Sam J. Smith 



Mill, Home.... 
Rfed, 

Churchland 
Denton 
Wallburg . 



Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 

G. Wilson Miller Sa'm J." Smith 

w w"'" J- Smith 

W, son M. er Sam J. Smith 

G. W.lson M.ller Sam J. Smith 

„J. A Neilson " r' n" ^""l""'"" Sam J. Smith 

W. k McGee" r' n ^'"""«"'" J. Smith 

, i R- D. Covington Sam I <:.^;.k 

John A. McMillan . G. Wilson Lu^rZ^^ J. sri'th 

R. D. Covington Sam J. Smith 



H. M. Stroup 



Center Hill _....L. S. Gaine, ... 
New Friend,hip ..N. C. Teague . 
Abbott. Creek . R. A. Herring 

B. A. Mitchell 

Thoma,Till« ....C. B. Atkin.ors 
V. B. Sear, 



"S" R" ^°*'"R'°" Sam J. Smith 

u' ?/ S"""*'"" Sam J. Smith 

H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

-H. M. Stroup Sam J. Smith 

-H. M. Stroup A. L. Snider 

-N. C. Teague A. L. Snider 



Eldorado 



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